Family Trees from My WIs

I meant Louis XI "the Spider":

  • Louis (18 October 1458 – 1460) - here would marry Marie of Burgundy
  • Joachim (15 July 1459 – 29 November 1459) - maybe Anne of Savoy? Isabel of Castile?
  • Louise (born and died in 1460)
  • Anne (3 April 1461 − 14 November 1522)
  • Joan (23 April 1464 – 4 February 1505)
  • Louis (born and died on 4 December 1466) marries TBD
  • Charles VIII of France (30 June 1470 – 8 April 1498)[50] marries TBD
  • Francis, Duke of Berry (3 September 1472 – November 1473) joins the church
My bad once again, however Joachim is a nice "exotic" royal name for a Valois Prince am I right?
 
Anybody have any suggestions for who Catalina of Castile, Dowager Princess of Viana (b.1361) can remarry to? A remarriage in Iberia seems unlikely, but she's a rather awkward age bracket (too old for Charles VI/Richard II who would be my likeliest ideas). Best option I can come up with is Enguerrand de Coucy's second wife.

Wondering if there's any good way to prevent the "near obvious" intermarriage that is likely between Duarte's eldest daughter and Joao I's son?

@isabella@VVD0D95 @Ivan Lupo @Zygmunt Stary @Jan Olbracht @RedKing @Kurt_Steiner
 
Maybe Catalina could remarry Wenceslaus, King of Bohemia and the Romans?
What about a slightly more "local" option? Juan d'Aragon, Conde d'Ampurias. He's a former son-in-law of Pedro IV of Aragon (his second wife died in 1385). Another Aragonese infante available would be Pedro, Marques de Villena (k.a. Aljubarrota OTL) but who married a bastard daughter of Enrique II of Castile.

@Kurt_Steiner @isabella @Diego @Jan Olbracht @Ivan Lupo
 
What about a slightly more "local" option? Juan d'Aragon, Conde d'Ampurias. He's a former son-in-law of Pedro IV of Aragon (his second wife died in 1385). Another Aragonese infante available would be Pedro, Marques de Villena (k.a. Aljubarrota OTL) but who married a bastard daughter of Enrique II of Castile.
Pedro Marquess de Villena seems more likely since he’s a Prince and could help Castilian relations with Aragon.
 
The Election of 1347
"After the death of Emperor Louis the Bavarian, it seemed to many as if a repeat of Louis' own election in 1314 would take place. The Wittelsbachs versus the Luxembourgs in another round of this dance. But this is an oversimplification of the events that took place. Even more than it is of the personalities.

"There was no single Wittelsbach "party" in the election. Just like the fact that your relation to the last emperor didn't mean you would automatically vote for the Wittelsbachs.

"The most obvious of these was Rupert II of the Palatinate. He was tied into the Wittelsbach Imperial network in several ways. His father was Adolf of the Palatinate, an older nephew of the late emperor, and a grandson of anti-king Adolf of Nassau. The Palatine Wittelsbachs nursed a grievance against their imperial cousins for usurping their inheritance. Rupert II's father, Adolph the Honest, had died fighting for his "fair share" in the Wittelsbach inheritance, leaving a two year old son under the regency of his pro-Habsburg uncle, Rudolph the Blind.

"The main Wittelsbach candidate in 1347 was naturally the deceased emperor's olddest son, Louis, Count of Tirol by marriage and former margrave of Brandenburg. He was supported by many of those who had benefitted from the Wittelsbach rule. These included his brother-in-law, Frederick of Meissen, and his son-in-law (who by a bizarre twist was also his wife's ex-husband), Johann Heinrich, Margrave of Brandenburg.

"A second Wittelsbach "splinter party" was headed by Rupert of the Palatinate who sponsored the candidacy of his in-law, Louis' surviving full brother, Stephen. Many dismiss Rupert's support as being simply the product of there being no Habsburg candidate available: Frederick the Handsome, Louis the Bavarian's "co-emperor" until his death1330, had left no son; nor had his late brother, Otto the Merry, whose son, once engaged to the king of England's daughter, had died in December 1344. Thus Albert the Lame ruled the entirety of the Habsburg lands. But since he supported Louis of Tirol, he was no use to Rupert's goal. However, in Rupert's sponsoring of his in-law one can see a finer hand at work. Rupert knew his own candidacy was not likely to raise objections from the Bavarian supporters, and so, he shrewdly backed his brother-in-law (Stephen and Rudolph the Blind were both married to Sicilian princesses, daughters of Frederick II of Sicily, while Rupert was married to Frederick's granddaughter).

"Finally the third of the Wittelsbach parties emerged. This was formed by Dowager Empress Margaret, Countess of Holland and Hainaut in her own right and stepmother to the aforementioned Louis and Stephen. Her oldest son was still shy of his majority, but had been married to the king of Poland, Casimir the Great's daughter since 1345. The girl was only twelve years old, so a child any time soon would be unlikely. Ergo, Margaret did the next best thing. She found a candidate who would ensure that the real power in Germany remained in her hands, and who would have no problem passing the power to her eldest son (confusingly also called Louis) when the tine came: her brother-in-law, Edward III of England.

"With all these internal divisions dividing the Wittelsbach support, it's hardly any surprise that none of them were elected emperor. Edward III's candidacy was, at first, successful, but he quickly realized how untenable the situation was, and resigned after eleven days. His war with France also made the German princes uneasy about being dragged into it if he were to be elected. Louis of Bavaria, Count of Tirol, was known to be rather friendly with Denmark and his aggression in the name of his one-time brother-in-law, Waldemar Atterdag, as well as his own policies both in Pomerania and Tirol didn't inspire confidence in those princes whose lands bordered on his. Even if he had - via Albert the Lame - papal endorsement of his candidacy. Thus, the princes elected the king of Bohemia: Charles Wenceslas." - Johann Jakob Gottfried Oberholzer, The Power and the Politics of 14th Century Germany (1992)
 
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