Explain the AH Quote

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Achaemenid Rome, Feb 3, 2017.

Tags:
  1. Roland Traveler [O5 Clearance Required]

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2014
    Location:
    The corner of Death City and Roma Novo
    A sarcastic remark from Roman Revolutionary Augustus Caesar II (nom de guerre, not actual) during the revolt against the Ostrogoth kingdom. Franglia, with several enemies on its borders, and the Papacy, who managed to annoy most leaders with claims of earthly supremacy, brought more problems than help to the Roman revolt. However, things were not as dark as they seemed. By 845, the Ostrogoths had decayed significantly, with most of their people identifying as Romans rather than Ostrogoths and the aristocracy engaged in infighting. The Romans, drawing from a wellspring of support and several traitorous dukes (or their equivalent), managed to regain their state.

    "Yesterday was a failure, I'll give you that, but it's behind us now. Looking ahead of us are the bright, rolling fields of our destiny, a destiny that tells us to survive, not fall! Are you truly willing to give up because of one loss?
    Of course not! We must persevere, regroup and regain our footing. Once we have that, nothing will stop us."
     
  2. House of Hohenzollern Underpaid and Overappreciated

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2017
    Location:
    Somewhere East of the Mississippi River
    This got posted earlier and I felt like somebody should respond to it.

    - Adolph Hitler, 1947

    Hitler misspoke out of anger. (The Danish Parliament has never been referred to as the National Assembly.) Though he neither knew nor cared what it was actually supposed to be called. (The Danish name for their Parliament was Folketinget). Even though he used the wrong name, he was in fact referring to Denmark's Parliament.

    After the death of King Christian X of Denmark in 1947, there were two very distinct emotional reactions.
    The Danish people were greatly saddened by the loss of their King, whose actions of standing up to Germans during the Second World War ensured that he would be forever loved by his countrymen.

    On the other hand, Most of the Nazi leadership was overjoyed by Christian's death. The Dane had been a thorn in their side ever since German forces had first occupied Denmark, and many Germany's leaders, including Hitler himself, swore the man acted out of pure spite (they were right, of course, but that is beside the point).

    As the Danish Royal family planned the funeral, they asked their German overlords for permission to fly the flag of Denmark from Christiansborg Palace which was the seat of the Danish Parliament and the Royal Palace in Copenhagen. (Ever since the end of the war in Europe, the Germans had discouraged, but not outright banned, the showing of Pre-War national flags in an effort to dampen nationalist sentiments in occupied countries.)

    When the German administrators of Denmark passed the Royal family's request to Berlin, Hitler said the aforementioned quote. (He not only detested Christian, but he was also in the early stages of becoming seriously mentally unhinged.)
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2017
  3. riskyrofl Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Yay I was noticed

    The ironic last words of Field Marshal Douglas Haig following the disastrous Battle of Chantilly, 1918, before being shot dead by assassin, mutineer and communist revolutionary Alfred Hitchcock. With the Allied forces in Northern France already in complete chaos after the German offensive, Haig's death served to accelerate the defeat of the allies. Within 10 days of Haig's death Paris had fallen.

    "It's dangerous to go alone! Take this"
     
  4. Sextus Munatius Piso The Last Among Equals

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2014
    Location:
    Fourth Rome
    A Colt firearms advertisement in the 1990s, at the height of the Gangsta Era.

    "The Jews? I'm rather fond of them." — Adolf Hitler
     
  5. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    Adolf Hitler, a far-right wing nationalist and antisemite, but not inclined to be a dictator - and thus joining DNVP instead of NSDAP - after winning the chancellorship of the Weimar Republic in 1924 by completely legal means. It had turned out that the Jewish vote almost universally went to the DNVP. The Hitler chancellorship turned out a good and prosperous one, and he was reelected in 1928 and 1932, although he did violate the Versailles Treaty when he applied ultra-Keynesianist policies by building up the military along with massive civilian investment as a response to the economic crises of the early 1930s, and initiated the development of a highly nationalist "consensus" in the Weimar Republic which one Abraham Esau continued when Hitler did not run in the 1935 Reichstag elections. The NSDAP project, although initiated in 1924-5 by the Strasser brothers, never got off the ground and remained a fringe party of 2 to 6 % (record: 7,31 % in the 1932 election).

    The coalition of Chancellor Abraham Esau was "diluted" by the presence of the DDP, and so, only when Ludwig Maier took the Chancellorship in 1939, Germany became really hawkish and started World War II, which was truly won (meaning: Brest-Litovsk-like treaty in the East, Alsace-Lorraine won back, legal Anschluss of Austria, South Tyrol won back) by 1943.

    "The Afterlife, as in the religious versions of it, are hereby proven to exist!"
     
  6. SavoyTruffle Rabbit Tank

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Location:
    Touto
    Noted Deist and skeptic Norma Baker was said to have uttered this when she met with her long-lost brother Jacob, who she had taken for dead after Jacob Baker's squadron were presumed lost over the skies of Spain. Baker and his squad survived however, leading subversive action against the nationalist cause. The incident caused Baker to rekindle her faith, and though becoming non-denominational as opposed to the Methodism of her childhood, was a noted religious apologist from that point onward.

    "We may have won, but the fact that a mouse has torn our eagle to shreds means it was not worth it."
     
  7. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    Democratic candidate Richard M. Sroka as part of his 1976 POTUS campaign after the grueling and attrition-causing Congo Civil War (1963-1980) led mainly by Barry Goldwater (1965-1969) and the more infamous Frank Church (1969-1977), where the US could not prevent division of the DRC, but had until 1976 prevented communism from arising in the Congo. The main - and hardest - part of the Congo Civil War was the Lingala Civil War where the communist guerillas in the deep rainforests of Lingala near the Uele River were still not extinguished in the fourteenth year of the civil war and GOP supporters, at least the hawkish and radical ones, feared - which would in the end even prove to be correct - that the planned "Localisation Measures" (=Congoisation) of the war that the Democratic Candidate Richard M. Sroka proposed would lead to Communism in the Free Lingala Republic.

    But as so many GIs had perished and the economy had been strained so much and the common population didn't see quite why millions of soldiers had to die in Central Africa (for what? for stability only? because some Africans shouldn't become commies?), Sroka won the 1976 POTUS election. Indeed, he Congoised the war and, although Katanga and Kasai and the remnant DRC could be "protected", the armies and remaining (South) African and European (mainly Spanish and Portuguese) supporters were unable (and in the end unwilling) to expend more and more troops and material to prevent Lingala and North Kivu from falling to communism.

    The People's Republic of Lingala today is one of the most obscure, but in a positive sense, communist states. Natives in the region don't really notice that their ideology is "communist" - they are very much used to dictatorships (kings, tribal leaders), and the General Secretary leaves his citizens alone most of the time. Of course, this leads to rather abject poverty and sometimes stone-age tech levels, but even Western citizens sometimes adore Lingalese leadership and "Lingalese way of life" as a good example of radical sustainablity and "living with nature". The beginnings of the Green and environmental movements that suddenly arose after a true "Silent Spring" overcame the USA in 1982 - very few birds had survived all that DDT - and then the Surry Nuclear Power Plant blocks 2, 3 and 4 were damaged and suffered nuclear meltdown Fukushima-way after Hurricane Richard in the autumn of 1982, even sometimes cited Lingala as "the way to do it" and "how we should live", well, at least the really radical fundamentalist ones...

    And such fundamentalist Greens, calling themselves "Protectionists" but being called "Greenies" or, more extreme, "Naturers" by opponents and sometimes - not without base - being accused of "valuing nature more than the human being", celebrated electoral successes mainly in Germany, but also in the UK, France, and notably in several US states (1994 Oregon gubernatorial election!). Germany, where their successes were most pronounced, under Chancellors Rainer Trampert (1987-1992) and Jutta Ditfurth (1992-2002), followed up by Bernhard Kray (2002-2007), a short term of Karl Rottmaier (CSU, 2007-2010) and then radicals like Elisabeth Vennebörger (2010-2015), Karin Süßmilch (2015-2023), Ana Borisov (2023-2028) and Christina Falchi (2028-2033), turned from a vibrant industrial first-world democracy into a strange Deep Ecology "democracy" with little industry left and a very simple, if not poor, standard of living. Elements of authoritarianism and even of totalitarianism are undisputably there as a lot of activities are banned that nobody would give a damn about in other countries. And no, it's not only about pesticide-spraying or the application of Lindane, but activities like drinking alcohol are a criminal offence (=prohibition!) and there are numerous age and other restrictions on digital media commonplace in other countries. Computer use is age-restricted, but especially, "useless" applications are mostly forbidden. Vegetarianism is quite commonly enforced as meat is only allowed to come from highly restricted ultra-organic farms, if at all available, and disputable up to and including esoteric teaching elements and methods (anything from yoga over alternative medicines to fundamentalist anthroposophy) have found a deep root in Germany's education system.
    However, on a positive note, a "Factual" populist youth movement is beginning to arise in the early 2030s of Germany which wants to disprove the spurious to outright outrageous (tinfoil hat) claims of the Vennebörger, Süßmilch, Borisov and Falchi Chancellorships by facts, want to catch up on tech and generally are just as 'unruly' and 'restless' as OTL 68ers. And they have recently won the Chancellorship under Jonas Roggausch!

    "Really? What on earth is so admirable about this 'democracy"? To me, this seems like tyranny of the masses! Why should anyone want to bring 'democracy' to everybody?"
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
    Crying likes this.
  8. Jack-Ryan Unapologetic Deep-Southerner

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2017
    A question posed by Knut V Steinar of Mellom-Amerika during a campaign debate between himself and fellow Knytling hopeful, and Libertarian candidate, Agnatha Alexander in 1834. Agnatha's response was to point out that Mellom-Amerika, unlike their Teutonic northern neighbors in Neu Danzig, were not a democracy in the traditional sense, but a representative republic, with systems that, while not perfect, keep the "tyranny of the masses" in check. This, combined with some of Knut's blunders in knowledge of economics, practically secured Agnatha's victory in the debate, and later the election to Knytling. His administration is characterized as one of economic prosperity under laissez-faire capitalism, alongside the loosening of government regulation on business.

    "Let's just say that some saint did get a hold of the tools of power and tried to implement "From each according to his ability, to each according to his need" in a pure and saint-like manner, here's what would happen: The next person in the revolutionary string would come along and stab them in their bed in the middle of the night and that would be the end of that."
     
    SaveAtlacamani likes this.
  9. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    Deserter and critic of Christianity (here meaning: the society of the Apostles and a few people in Jerusalem under a form of communism) Gaius Quirilius, 803 AUC (50 AD), in a speech in Jerusalem, explaining why this "Christianity" sect/cult going on was at best useless and at worst a danger to the empire. He probably put off quite a few would-be converts, but the governors of Judea did not see a further need to act on the cult as it "would burn itself out". And this is what happened: By 833 AUC, the sect had turned *Stalinist with purges going on, and by 873 AUC, nearly no person would confess to be Christian anymore. The texts ended up preserved in some library, Europe had several problems with Christian uprisings around 2518 AUC, but exiled the "traitors" and "deserters" to the Americas. In the end, only in the year 2590 AUC would a whole nation become Christian again, having fought against the mighty Roman Empire before to achieve independence: The Republicae Christianae de Operaiae Tenessae (approx.: Christian Workers' Republics of Tennessa/Tennessee), which encompassed territory from southern Missouri to Cuba and Anguilla. This nation is still existing, along with a country called - in Latin - Republica Phta-kva-ndembae (derived from Ewe, Akan, or Yoruba) in Eastern Brazil and the infamous Dictatura Christiana (a totalitarian Christian Australia resembling North Korea or even Oceania, nearly closed off to the outside world), but Christian states are commonly seen as pariahs as they are either under totalitarian purging regimes or use other more radical methods (e.g. "constant passion" is suspected to be used in the DC) to keep power in check. Such states have very few allies. The RCOT and the other two Christian states have a very low living standard because of that and are commonly seen as what we would call State Supporters of Terrorism or rogue states.

    "The terrorists of the Kingdom of God from Kaiserslautern have claimed responsibility again. We will forever stand by the victims of the terrorist attacks that have happened on Friday in Ar-Raqqa and by their families! This is an attack on humanity, on freedom and on our values! This can only embolden, never weaken us in the fight against the scourge that is the Kingdom of God! The terrorists cannot kill our values, our democracy, our freedom and our way of life!"
     
  10. Halocon Bay Area Badhistorian

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2016
    Location:
    East Bay, CA
    King Salman ibn Abdullah Hashim of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and Syria after the 2034 Gotteskönigreich attack on Raqqa. After this incident, the king (who had experience fighting the similar radical state Daesh, who had killed his father) would send multiple battalions to assist the German government in putting the terrorists down before a Syria-like situation emerged. The GKR conflict would soon expand into the larger six-year European War of Reaction, a struggle that allowed Jordan-Syria to truly enter the world stage after decades of hardships in the Middle East. Salman himself would, true to his name, become known as "the Great," for his defeat of terrorism and sweeping reforms and reconstruction in devastated Syria.

    "The cyning was on carven throne, in many-pillar'd halls of stone..."
     
    SaveAtlacamani likes this.
  11. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    The first line of Shakespeare's Cymru. One could, with a stretch, even call it alternate history as the drama revolves around an alternate outcome of a battle in 11th Century Wales (Monmouthshire)...

    "The Gotteskönigreich from Kaiserslautern has claimed responsibility, the Nationale Armee Lauchhammer has claimed responsibility, the People's Councils of Essen and of Gelsenkirchen, of Vechta and of Papenburg have claimed it - each separately, of course - the "Zweite Europäische Union" in Aachen claimed responsibility, and last, but not least, the Neue Heilsarmee (New Salvation Army) from Füssen also claimed responsibility. So... what do we do now? Who killed 13 players of Real Madrid last Wednesday, ending the careers of 8 more?"
     
  12. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    Bump it up again!

    Nobody interested anymore here?
     
  13. severak Sources Wikipedia

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2015
    Location:
    A Catholic Liberal Arts College
    Oh, I'm interested, I just have no idea where to go with it.
     
  14. Hominid The Real Hominid

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Location:
    Lloegr Newydd
    Headline in 1984 describing the comfortable Mondale victory that was widely expected based on polls. It turned out that Reagan had actually won in a landslide, winning every state except Minnesota. It turned out that the entire polling industry was controlled by a corrupt group of people who manipulated the polls to show a Mondale victory for reasons that are still unknown. The polling industry would never be the same again.

    "Actually Alaska used to be a part of Russia."

    EDIT: Whoa, I totally missed that I skipped a few pages. I will make another post.
     
    SaveAtlacamani likes this.
  15. Hominid The Real Hominid

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Location:
    Lloegr Newydd
    The lede of a news story on the killing of 13 players from Real Madrid on April 17, 2017. This followed a controversial decision to hold a crucial football match in Germany during the German Civil War, one of the bloodiest conflicts thus far in 21st Century Europe. Several German terrorist organizations claimed responsibility, which made it very difficult for the authorities to figure out who committed the act. As of April 19, it is still unclear what exactly happened.

    "Actually Alaska used to be a part of Russia."
     
    SaveAtlacamani likes this.
  16. Halocon Bay Area Badhistorian

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2016
    Location:
    East Bay, CA
    Laurentide Professor Giuseppe O'Leary correcting one of his students on the status of the State of Alyeska, a major rival to the Federated Laurentide Union. The student in question believed that Alyeska was once Nihonian.

    "...And now we have the Khans of the Yspan Ricket and Groat-Prydainia on their way to meet Kublai XIX."
    -Gricker (Greek) newscaster
     
    SaveAtlacamani and Hominid like this.
  17. SaveAtlacamani Napoleon the Red Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    United Humanities of Germany
    Centuries after a nuclear-biological-chemical apocalypse in 2017/8, names and meanings have been obscured. The term "Khan" has become a general term for a leader of a nation, not just for Central Asia, and "ricket" - nobody knows its origin anymore - is frequently used for any kingdom or empire. The Khans (=Emperors/Kings) of the Yspan Ricket (=Spanish Reich, but now speaking Spanglish mixed with Esperanto and in Mexico and the Southwest US, incl. Texas) and Prydainia (some of the remnants of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Newfoundland, ...) are meeting up with Kublai XIX., some King in Asia...

    "What on earth is the NSA up to? Detaining people?"
     
  18. House of Hohenzollern Underpaid and Overappreciated

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2017
    Location:
    Somewhere East of the Mississippi River
    - Bob Woodword spoken to Carl Bernstein as the two drove from to New York from Washington D.C.

    When the NSA was created by President Truman in 1954, its existence was kept secret from the public. After the horrifying discoveries of the massive extent of the Soviet Union's infiltration of the Manhattan Project, a paranoid President Eisenhower decided to keep it a secret and to expand its powers to "help find Commie traitors" as the President put it to his chief of staff, by granting it authority to wiretap phones, tamper with mail, and install various listening devices wherever they saw fit. The agency was also told that no one, save the President was off limits, including other government officials and members of Congress. The idealistic President Kennedy planned to curtail the agency's size and surveillance powers, but he was assassinated before he could carry out his plans to do so. President Johnson saw no reason to diminish the agencies size, but he did declassify its existence. (The public was lied to about the extent of its powers, of course. They were told that it was a small agency that occasionally listened to the phone calls of suspected spies.

    Unfortunately, when Nixon came into office, he saw the NSA as a useful means towards his own political ends. He used the NSA as his own personal Gestapo, eavesdropping on Civil Rights Leaders, Anti-War activists, and Democrats. Because of the NSA, there was no Watergate Break-in, but there were electronic bugs, lots of bugs. The extent of Nixon's overreach was not discovered until midday through the Presidency of his successor, Spiro Agnew, and was made public by the Church Committee in Congress. The resulting political fallout sent shockwaves though Washington. The New Times lead story, written by Bob Woodword and Carl Bernstein, was famously titled "THE THOUGHT POLICE" in reference to George Orwell's novel 1984. It resulted in the impeachment of Spiro Agnew, the trust of the American people in America's intelligence services being forever broken, and the election of Democratic Senator Frank Church as President of the United States in the election of 1980.

    "For the city whose most famous epithet is 'The City of Light', it sure is dark here."
     
    The Champion likes this.
  19. riskyrofl Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Famous words of commentator Tony "Blairsy" Blair during the 1998 FIFA World Cup Final. A clever double entendre by Blairsy after Zinedine Zidane's controversial 79th goal in which a lighting failure that turned off lights for a second allowed Zidane to beat a confused Thom Yorke, sealing France's victory over England.

    "Im all my years as a music journalist i've never seen an album that has caused such social upheaval as the one I hold right now"
     
    The Champion likes this.
  20. Halocon Bay Area Badhistorian

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2016
    Location:
    East Bay, CA
    British musical critic Leonard Joplin on the Quarrymen's self-titled first album, which caused a large pro-peace subculture to emerge in the Military States of America (founded by Douglas MacArthur following a Khaki victory in the Second Civil War). The purge and crackdowns against the Quarry movement led to the overthrow of MacArthur in 1961, though at the cost of 15,000 civilian lives.

    "The rights of the Russian LGBT community, without a doubt, should be upheld along with the rights of all others."
    -President Vladimir Putin
     
    The Champion likes this.