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Sigh, Another Timeline?
Yes.
Well, get on with it, what's it about?
My attempt at a realistic Mexico-Wank with the Second Mexican Empire Succeeding
How will you update this TL?
Dunno. I have exams going on, and I wrote this after I got too tired from studying.1 update per 2 weeks is what I seem to be going for.
Well, what are you waiting for?
All right, you asked for it.
 
Chapter 1: Death and Misfortune
Chapter 1: Death and Misfortune


Excerpt: Rise of Empires: Mexico

‘……In the year 1864, two sides were locked in deadly combat with one another, as war raged on throughout the nation of Mexico. Mexico had never been a stable nation after the coups and counter-coups of the 1820s and 1830s, and the Mexican-American War hadn’t done much to add to the stability of the nation. But after the said war, two political factions began to vie for power over the other in the nation. The Conservative Party and the Liberal Party were extremely prejudiced against one another, and this resulted in overt political polarization in the nation of Mexico. Polarization came to a head as the tinpot Dictator of Mexico, Santa Anna was deposed in 1855 triggering the foundations for the Reform War of 1858 between the Conservatives and the Liberals. The Liberals won, but not for long, as the Second French Empire under Napoleon III invaded Mexico under the pretenses of retaking defaulted loans and installing a familiar and pro-French regime, in total contradiction of the American-led Monroe Doctrine. By the summer of 1864, after a rather mixed plebiscite (which was democratic & fair in some departments where it was held, and rather undemocratic in some other departments), Mexico was declared to be a Constitutional Monarchy under the sovereignty of Archduke Maximilian von Habsburg-Lothringen of Austria. Maximilian became Emperor Maximiliano I of Mexico and his dear Belgian wife, Charlotte, became Empress Carlotta.


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Maximiliano I & Carlotta

But enemies did not allow Mexico to become a monarchy easily. Former Liberals, now called Republicans banded together to oust the foreign monarchy and reunite the nation under the banner of Republican Leader, President Benito Juarez, who spearheaded the Republican movement. Juarez and Maximiliano I were not different people. Both of them had similar goals and similar ideologies – namely the development of Mexico and the creation of a prosperous and united Mexico. But on fundamental levels, both of them could not reconcile with one another. One was a Republican and another was a Monarch after all. When he arrived on Mexican shores, Maximiliano I did attempt to reconcile the Empire and the Republicans and offered Juarez total amnesty and the position of Prime Minister. Juarez, whilst respecting Maximiliano I from a personal perspective, could not accept a government which he believed to be imposed by foreigners and outsiders. He refused this last chance at reconciliation. Arguably, this refusal laid the foundations for his death.

1637660971199.png

Benito Juarez

Imperial forces in 1864, with the aid of the French troops and Austro-Belgian volunteers began to spread throughout the nation, to impose Imperial rule on Mexico once and for all. Imperial loyalist general Tomas Mejia marched north to capture the important city of Monterrey in Northern Mexico. At the same time, with the loss of Mexico City to the Imperials and French, Juarez had temporarily taken up shelter in Monterrey, conspicuously close to the Mexican-American border. Juarez hadn’t been able to leave the city when Mejia approached the outskirts of the city on the 29th, and Juarez himself was cut in the crossfire of the ensuing battle. Juarez was the highest commander in the city and the regiments commanded by the Republicans deferred to him, however Juarez himself was unable to break out of the encirclement tactics that Mejia employed against the northern city. After a few hours of delay, Mejia and 2,000 Imperial troops aided by 400 French soldiers stormed the city of Monterrey intent on taking it once and for all. The ensuing hand to hand combat of the Republicans and Imperials within the roads and squares of the city involved high level officers as well, and Juarez himself was caught in the fighting. Jose Maria Iglesias, a close confidante of Juarez managed to order a few Republican troops to find a way out of the city, which was on the verge of falling to the Imperials. However, at the same time, Colonel Francois de Salazar, a French commander in command of the artillery, who had been held up by partisan and guerilla activity arrived and positioned his artillery on the lanes outside of the city to provide devastating fire towards the Republicans. Near the frontlines as Juarez was at the time, a shell exploded near him, and the fragments of the shell managed to wound him most grievously. Iglesias managed to take the wounded leader away from Monterrey just in time as Mejia flew the Imperial banner over the city’s main palace.

1637661053781.png

Capture of Monterrey

Iglesias and Juarez’s cabinet fled towards Chihuahua, where they were out of Imperial scrutiny, but without proper medical support on the harsh journey towards the northern department, Juarez soon died of the injuries he sustained at Monterrey on the 8th of September, 1864. The death of Juarez was something that no one could have predicted among the Republican Camp, and everyone among said camp was caught off-guard on their future course of actions in light of the death. Leadership problems erupted among the Mexican Republicans almost immediately.

1637661100164.png

Ortega, the chief pretender to the Presidency

The entire Republican movement had been so splintered, that it had been held together only by Juarez’s personal legitimacy and his own charisma and set of alliances among the Republican leadership. Without him, said legitimacy and alliances started to flounder apart. Iglesias fought with Sebastian Lerdro de Tejada, both of whom claimed to be Juarez’s successors, whilst as news of the death spread down south, other Republican commanders began to squabble with one another as well. General Jesus Gonzalez Ortega decided that as the strongest military commander for the Republicans in the north, he named himself President of the Republic of Mexico and refused to entertain the claims of both Iglesias and Tejada, and called the previous cabinet of Juarez to defer to himself. In Guanajuato, Manuel Doblado another competitor for the Presidency declared himself to be the legitimate successor of Juarez and as such the new President of the Republic. With the four claimants in the north, it can hardly be a surprise that other Republican bands waiting for orders from the top were caught by confusion as all four claimants sent rather differing orders for them to carry out. This confusion among the Republican ranks was exploited by the Imperial Generals, and General Jose Maria Tranquilino Almada inflicted a devastating defeat on the Republicans under the command of General Jose Maria Arteaga Magallanes at the Battle of San Julian near Guadalajara. The Imperial Government still didn’t know about the situation in the north and of Juarez’s death and instead took the fumbling of the Republican troops as the war finally swinging in favor of the Imperial government. They weren’t particularly wrong about that either…..’ [1]



Excerpt: Maximiliano & Carlotta: The Couple That Defined Mexico

‘…. As Juarez died of his wounds, Maximiliano I was going on a tour of Central Mexico, hoping to make sure that he would be well received by the Mexican population of the time. Maximiliano I and the Empress Carlotta, both managed to charm the Mexican Elite and the Indigenous Tribal Leaders. Maximiliano I was fluent in 11 languages (German, Spanish, French, Flemish, Latin, English, Italian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, & Croatian) and Carlotta was fluent in German, Spanish, French, English, Italian and Flemish. Their cultural acumen managed to impress most of the Mexican elite and tribal leaders, who were won over by Carlotta’s hard work and Maximiliano’s kind persona. To show his magnanimous approach to governing and to reward services rendered to the new Imperial Crown of Mexico, Maximiliano I established the Order of the Mexican Eagle and the Order of Guadalupe. Similarly, Carlotta established the Order of San Carlos as an orderly dispensation towards successful women in the Second Mexican Empire. In terms of the two orders made by Maximiliano, the Order of the Mexican Eagle was an honor made for a limited amount of people – namely Knights, Officers, Commanders and Grand Officers, and as such it was mostly a military order. His second order, the Order of Guadalupe was a much less exclusive order, and was handed out to any citizen who showed themselves to be working extraordinarily in favor of the Second Mexican Empire.


1637661161253.png

Order of the Mexican Eagle

The imperial couple was determined to make Mexico what could essentially be called as a central paragon of culture. Carlotta was ambitious in her approach to particularly large balls and gatherings, which she usually gave on Monday evenings, at either the National Palace in Mexico City, or at the Couple’s new home – Chapultepec Palace. Styled in a mixture of European court traditions and Mexican indigenous decorations, these Monday balls were truly something that one had to gaze upon to register its wonder. Food wise, the Imperial Couple spared no expenses either. Viennese, Belgian, Austrian, French dishes made up the European side of menu whilst exotic dishes such as Tacos, Tostada, Tortas, Gorditas, Champurrados made up the Mexican side of the Imperial couple’s served dishes. On some occasions, commoners from Mexico City were allowed to join the balls, though limited to the merchants and bankers and other important commoners of the city. Maximiliano I also invited several artists who performed operatic and orchestral performances during these balls, leaving no doubt that the Imperial couple had good taste in music. Privately, these balls had another function as well, other than simply impressing the Elite, foreigners and people of Mexico. Maximiliano I used these gala events to observe the people closely, to discern allies, and to discern future political enemies and opponents.

1637661277257.png

The cry of Dolores

To know more about his new country, Maximiliano I set out on a grand journey of Central Mexico on the 10th of August 1864. With a contingent of 60 soldiers he travelled through the ill-maintained Mexican paths wearing nothing but a traditional Mexican charro attire, leaving his wife, Carlotta as Regent in Mexico City. Maximiliano I had timed his journey to match with the National Holiday of Independence in Mexico. On September 15, 1864, he arrived in Dolores and partook in the traditional Cry of the Dolores. A massive Independence Day Celebration took place in the city in honor of independence and their new Emperor. In Dolores, he attracted a great crowd as he addressed them. His voice quivered a bit – the Emperor was timid about speaking in Spanish during his earlier days – but he managed to make himself heard by the large gathering. In his speech he called for unity and to disregarding the blatant political violent polarization of the past, and called for unity and seize the Mexican future. Always a charismatic speaker, despite his surprising timidity regarding Spanish, the crowd returned his enthusiasm and returned the Emperor with a thunderous applause and shouts of support. [2]

1637661318051.png

Jose Maria Lacunza, 1st Chancellor of Imperial Mexico

On the 29th of September, Maximiliano’s visit across Central Mexico was cut short as news arrived to the south that Juarez had died and several political factions among the Republicans were now fighting amongst one another in a bid to secure their own power. Maximiliano I decided to return back home to Mexico City to appraise the military and domestic situation in light of the Republican Leader’s death. It was good that Maximiliano I decided to return as on the 2nd of October 1864, a particularly strong earthquake struck Puebla, and its aftershocks were felt as far as Mexico City. Maximiliano returned to Mexico City on the 8th and then visited Puebla on the 10th where he personally led some reconstruction works, on the advice of his Council of Ministers. Certainly this charitable work abled him to heighten his image in front of the Pueblan populace. After returning back from Puebla, Maximiliano I officially ended the Imperial Regency and appointed a new government within which framework, the Imperial Government would function.

Jose Maria Lacunza’s position as Chancellor of Mexico was reaffirmed and a new cabinet appointed by Maximiliano I consisted of:-


  • Minister of the Interior: Jose Salazar Illarregui (Conservative)
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs: Jose Fernando Ramirez (Liberal)
  • Minister of Financial & Economic Affairs: Jose Maria Garmendia (Liberal)
  • Minister of War & the Navy: Ignacio Suarez Navarro (Conservative)
  • Minister of Transportation: Jose Miguel Arroyo (Conservative)
  • Minister of Culture & Tradition: Faustino Chimalpopoca (Liberal)
The new government was the perfect balance of Liberal and Conservative and highlighted Maximiliano I’s pledge to form a new government that would work to heal the partisan divides of the past. The new government was appointed on the 24th of October under the Chancellorship of Lacunza, who remained in the confidence of the Emperor, and the new cabinet prepared to create new plans for finishing what was now being dubbed as the Mexican Civil War. Good news arrived for the Imperial government when on the 6th of November, Colonel Porfirio Diaz, who commanded 4,000 troops and the Republican resistance in Oaxaca decided to defect over to the Imperial government. Diaz had initially been a Republican, but his ideologies had always been in flux and he had never been trusted fully by the Republicans. Diaz believed that the fracture of heading the Republicans now meant that it was impossible for an outright Republican victory and he threw his dice into the Imperial side. This good news was offset by the fact that relations with France started to become strained as Emperor Maximiliano I took the advice of Miguel Miramon (who was still conversing with the Emperor through letters from Europe) and expanded the Imperial Mexican Army greatly, leaving the French forces in the region in the proverbial dust. But Maximiliano I was not perturbed by this sudden straining of the relation between Mexico City and Paris, for he had received great news during the waning days of November 1864.

The Empress Carlotta was pregnant…..’ [3]




Footnotes:-

[1] – Juarez was in Monterrey two days before the capture. He was almost stalled because Tejada was trying to persuade the man to stay, and ittl Tejada is successful, leading to the events in Monterrey ittl.

[2] – Nearly as otl.

[3] – Carlotta showed signs of fake pregnancy during this time otl, ittl its an actual pregnancy.

Main sources are from Maximilian & Carlota and Biography of Power within the chapter.
 
Last edited:
Chapter 1: Death and Misfortune


Excerpt: Rise of Empires: Mexico

‘……In the year 1864, two sides were locked in deadly combat with one another, as war raged on throughout the nation of Mexico. Mexico had never been a stable nation after the coups and counter-coups of the 1820s and 1830s, and the Mexican-American War hadn’t done much to add to the stability of the nation. But after the said war, two political factions began to vie for power over the other in the nation. The Conservative Party and the Liberal Party were extremely prejudiced against one another, and this resulted in overt political polarization in the nation of Mexico. Polarization came to a head as the tinpot Dictator of Mexico, Santa Anna was deposed in 1855 triggering the foundations for the Reform War of 1858 between the Conservatives and the Liberals. The Liberals won, but not for long, as the Second French Empire under Napoleon III invaded Mexico under the pretenses of retaking defaulted loans and installing a familiar and pro-French regime, in total contradiction of the American-led Monroe Doctrine. By the summer of 1864, after a rather mixed plebiscite (which was democratic & fair in some departments where it was held, and rather undemocratic in some other departments), Mexico was declared to be a Constitutional Monarchy under the sovereignty of Archduke Maximilian von Habsburg-Lothringen of Austria. Maximilian became Emperor Maximiliano I of Mexico and his dear Belgian wife, Charlotte, became Empress Carlotta.


But enemies did not allow Mexico to become a monarchy easily. Former Liberals, now called Republicans banded together to oust the foreign monarchy and reunite the nation under the banner of Republican Leader, President Benito Juarez, who spearheaded the Republican movement. Juarez and Maximiliano I were not different people. Both of them had similar goals and similar ideologies – namely the development of Mexico and the creation of a prosperous and united Mexico. But on fundamental levels, both of them could not reconcile with one another. One was a Republican and another was a Monarch after all. When he arrived on Mexican shores, Maximiliano I did attempt to reconcile the Empire and the Republicans and offered Juarez total amnesty and the position of Prime Minister. Juarez, whilst respecting Maximiliano I from a personal perspective, could not accept a government which he believed to be imposed by foreigners and outsiders. He refused this last chance at reconciliation. Arguably, this refusal laid the foundations for his death.

View attachment 697771
Benito Juarez

Imperial forces in 1864, with the aid of the French troops and Austro-Belgian volunteers began to spread throughout the nation, to impose Imperial rule on Mexico once and for all. Imperial loyalist general Tomas Mejia marched north to capture the important city of Monterrey in Northern Mexico. At the same time, with the loss of Mexico City to the Imperials and French, Juarez had temporarily taken up shelter in Monterrey, conspicuously close to the Mexican-American border. Juarez hadn’t been able to leave the city when Mejia approached the outskirts of the city on the 29th, and Juarez himself was cut in the crossfire of the ensuing battle. Juarez was the highest commander in the city and the regiments commanded by the Republicans deferred to him, however Juarez himself was unable to break out of the encirclement tactics that Mejia employed against the northern city. After a few hours of delay, Mejia and 2,000 Imperial troops aided by 400 French soldiers stormed the city of Monterrey intent on taking it once and for all. The ensuing hand to hand combat of the Republicans and Imperials within the roads and squares of the city involved high level officers as well, and Juarez himself was caught in the fighting. Jose Maria Iglesias, a close confidante of Juarez managed to order a few Republican troops to find a way out of the city, which was on the verge of falling to the Imperials. However, at the same time, Colonel Francois de Salazar, a French commander in command of the artillery, who had been held up by partisan and guerilla activity arrived and positioned his artillery on the lanes outside of the city to provide devastating fire towards the Republicans. Near the frontlines as Juarez was at the time, a shell exploded near him, and the fragments of the shell managed to wound him most grievously. Iglesias managed to take the wounded leader away from Monterrey just in time as Mejia flew the Imperial banner over the city’s main palace.

View attachment 697772
Capture of Monterrey

Iglesias and Juarez’s cabinet fled towards Chihuahua, where they were out of Imperial scrutiny, but without proper medical support on the harsh journey towards the northern department, Juarez soon died of the injuries he sustained at Monterrey on the 8th of September, 1864. The death of Juarez was something that no one could have predicted among the Republican Camp, and everyone among said camp was caught off-guard on their future course of actions in light of the death. Leadership problems erupted among the Mexican Republicans almost immediately.

View attachment 697773
Ortega, the chief pretender to the Presidency

The entire Republican movement had been so splintered, that it had been held together only by Juarez’s personal legitimacy and his own charisma and set of alliances among the Republican leadership. Without him, said legitimacy and alliances started to flounder apart. Iglesias fought with Sebastian Lerdro de Tejada, both of whom claimed to be Juarez’s successors, whilst as news of the death spread down south, other Republican commanders began to squabble with one another as well. General Jesus Gonzalez Ortega decided that as the strongest military commander for the Republicans in the north, he named himself President of the Republic of Mexico and refused to entertain the claims of both Iglesias and Tejada, and called the previous cabinet of Juarez to defer to himself. In Guanajuato, Manuel Doblado another competitor for the Presidency declared himself to be the legitimate successor of Juarez and as such the new President of the Republic. With the four claimants in the north, it can hardly be a surprise that other Republican bands waiting for orders from the top were caught by confusion as all four claimants sent rather differing orders for them to carry out. This confusion among the Republican ranks was exploited by the Imperial Generals, and General Jose Maria Tranquilino Almada inflicted a devastating defeat on the Republicans under the command of General Jose Maria Arteaga Magallanes at the Battle of San Julian near Guadalajara. The Imperial Government still didn’t know about the situation in the north and of Juarez’s death and instead took the fumbling of the Republican troops as the war finally swinging in favor of the Imperial government. They weren’t particularly wrong about that either…..’ [1]



Excerpt: Maximiliano & Carlotta: The Couple That Defined Mexico

‘…. As Juarez died of his wounds, Maximiliano I was going on a tour of Central Mexico, hoping to make sure that he would be well received by the Mexican population of the time. Maximiliano I and the Empress Carlotta, both managed to charm the Mexican Elite and the Indigenous Tribal Leaders. Maximiliano I was fluent in 11 languages (German, Spanish, French, Flemish, Latin, English, Italian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, & Croatian) and Carlotta was fluent in German, Spanish, French, English, Italian and Flemish. Their cultural acumen managed to impress most of the Mexican elite and tribal leaders, who were won over by Carlotta’s hard work and Maximiliano’s kind persona. To show his magnanimous approach to governing and to reward services rendered to the new Imperial Crown of Mexico, Maximiliano I established the Order of the Mexican Eagle and the Order of Guadalupe. Similarly, Carlotta established the Order of San Carlos as an orderly dispensation towards successful women in the Second Mexican Empire. In terms of the two orders made by Maximiliano, the Order of the Mexican Eagle was an honor made for a limited amount of people – namely Knights, Officers, Commanders and Grand Officers, and as such it was mostly a military order. His second order, the Order of Guadalupe was a much less exclusive order, and was handed out to any citizen who showed themselves to be working extraordinarily in favor of the Second Mexican Empire.

View attachment 697774
Order of the Mexican Eagle

The imperial couple was determined to make Mexico what could essentially be called as a central paragon of culture. Carlotta was ambitious in her approach to particularly large balls and gatherings, which she usually gave on Monday evenings, at either the National Palace in Mexico City, or at the Couple’s new home – Chapultepec Palace. Styled in a mixture of European court traditions and Mexican indigenous decorations, these Monday balls were truly something that one had to gaze upon to register its wonder. Food wise, the Imperial Couple spared no expenses either. Viennese, Belgian, Austrian, French dishes made up the European side of menu whilst exotic dishes such as Tacos, Tostada, Tortas, Gorditas, Champurrados made up the Mexican side of the Imperial couple’s served dishes. On some occasions, commoners from Mexico City were allowed to join the balls, though limited to the merchants and bankers and other important commoners of the city. Maximiliano I also invited several artists who performed operatic and orchestral performances during these balls, leaving no doubt that the Imperial couple had good taste in music. Privately, these balls had another function as well, other than simply impressing the Elite, foreigners and people of Mexico. Maximiliano I used these gala events to observe the people closely, to discern allies, and to discern future political enemies and opponents.

View attachment 697775
The cry of Dolores

To know more about his new country, Maximiliano I set out on a grand journey of Central Mexico on the 10th of August 1864. With a contingent of 60 soldiers he travelled through the ill-maintained Mexican paths wearing nothing but a traditional Mexican charro attire, leaving his wife, Carlotta as Regent in Mexico City. Maximiliano I had timed his journey to match with the National Holiday of Independence in Mexico. On September 15, 1864, he arrived in Dolores and partook in the traditional Cry of the Dolores. A massive Independence Day Celebration took place in the city in honor of independence and their new Emperor. In Dolores, he attracted a great crowd as he addressed them. His voice quivered a bit – the Emperor was timid about speaking in Spanish during his earlier days – but he managed to make himself heard by the large gathering. In his speech he called for unity and to disregarding the blatant political violent polarization of the past, and called for unity and seize the Mexican future. Always a charismatic speaker, despite his surprising timidity regarding Spanish, the crowd returned his enthusiasm and returned the Emperor with a thunderous applause and shouts of support. [2]

View attachment 697776
Jose Maria Lacunza, 1st Chancellor of Imperial Mexico

On the 29th of September, Maximiliano’s visit across Central Mexico was cut short as news arrived to the south that Juarez had died and several political factions among the Republicans were now fighting amongst one another in a bid to secure their own power. Maximiliano I decided to return back home to Mexico City to appraise the military and domestic situation in light of the Republican Leader’s death. It was good that Maximiliano I decided to return as on the 2nd of October 1864, a particularly strong earthquake struck Puebla, and its aftershocks were felt as far as Mexico City. Maximiliano returned to Mexico City on the 8th and then visited Puebla on the 10th where he personally led some reconstruction works, on the advice of his Council of Ministers. Certainly this charitable work abled him to heighten his image in front of the Pueblan populace. After returning back from Puebla, Maximiliano I officially ended the Imperial Regency and appointed a new government within which framework, the Imperial Government would function.

Jose Maria Lacunza’s position as Chancellor of Mexico was reaffirmed and a new cabinet appointed by Maximiliano I consisted of:-

  • Minister of the Interior: Jose Salazar Illarregui (Conservative)
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs: Jose Fernando Ramirez (Liberal)
  • Minister of Financial & Economic Affairs: Jose Maria Garmendia (Liberal)
  • Minister of War & the Navy: Ignacio Suarez Navarro (Conservative)
  • Minister of Transportation: Jose Miguel Arroyo (Conservative)
  • Minister of Culture & Tradition: Faustino Chimalpopoca (Liberal)
The new government was the perfect balance of Liberal and Conservative and highlighted Maximiliano I’s pledge to form a new government that would work to heal the partisan divides of the past. The new government was appointed on the 24th of October under the Chancellorship of Lacunza, who remained in the confidence of the Emperor, and the new cabinet prepared to create new plans for finishing what was now being dubbed as the Mexican Civil War. Good news arrived for the Imperial government when on the 6th of November, Colonel Porfirio Diaz, who commanded 4,000 troops and the Republican resistance in Oaxaca decided to defect over to the Imperial government. Diaz had initially been a Republican, but his ideologies had always been in flux and he had never been trusted fully by the Republicans. Diaz believed that the fracture of heading the Republicans now meant that it was impossible for an outright Republican victory and he threw his dice into the Imperial side. This good news was offset by the fact that relations with France started to become strained as Emperor Maximiliano I took the advice of Miguel Miramon (who was still conversing with the Emperor through letters from Europe) and expanded the Imperial Mexican Army greatly, leaving the French forces in the region in the proverbial dust. But Maximiliano I was not perturbed by this sudden straining of the relation between Mexico City and Paris, for he had received great news during the waning days of November 1864.

The Empress Carlotta was pregnant…..’ [3]



Footnotes:-

[1] – Juarez was in Monterrey two days before the capture. He was almost stalled because Tejada was trying to persuade the man to stay, and ittl Tejada is successful, leading to the events in Monterrey ittl.

[2] – Nearly as otl.

[3] – Carlotta showed signs of fake pregnancy during this time otl, ittl its an actual pregnancy.
This I’m gonna be another great timeline with your others. Curious though I almost expected it to be a self insert of maximiiano and Carlotta but this works and hopefully he can try to help out during the civil war hopefully he sides with the north and maybe prevent Lincoln from firing but it’s you story and hope your exams go 👍 keep up the updates!!
 
This I’m gonna be another great timeline with your others. Curious though I almost expected it to be a self insert of maximiiano and Carlotta but this works and hopefully he can try to help out during the civil war hopefully he sides with the north and maybe prevent Lincoln from firing but it’s you story and hope your exams go 👍 keep up the updates!!
Thank you!
 
Nice series you have, I hope relations between the US and Mexico become positive, maybe with a more stable Mexico coming around some sort of arrangement could be made. Keep up the good.
 
Nice series you have, I hope relations between the US and Mexico become positive, maybe with a more stable Mexico coming around some sort of arrangement could be made. Keep up the good.
for the moment, the breakage of the Monroe Doctrine by the 2nd Empire will lead to sour relations, but that probably wont be the case permanently, due to sheer pragmaticism rather than anything else.
 
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