EqualX Project

View attachment 501257

Don’t know if this goes here, but I’ve started working on a 1930 EqualX map

To do list for this one is fixing the Aral Sea, giving Italy Fiume and the bit of Dalmatian coast I seemed to have forgotten, and then filling in the rest of the world.
Awesome! Good luck

I once made a quick Virgin earth EqualA, it may have some mistakes tho, but i think Aral Sea/Lake Chad are decent enough



Also if i may suggest you something it would be to make your map without the topographic base because it seems useless.

Also if you want help with the map, i'd be glad to help make some part of it.
 
Apologies if my question appears difficult to understand, but how many degrees per pixel are in the map(s)?

I will need the value(s) to plot borders and the like on the map(s) with as much accuracy as possible.

If such an answer cannot be provided, I guess I should learn how to use a GIS...
 
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Apologies if my question appears difficult to understand, but how many degrees per pixel are in the map(s)?

I will need the value(s) to plot borders and the like on the map(s) with as much accuracy as possible.

If such an answer cannot be provided, I guess I should learn how to use a GIS...
Are you basically asking how many pixels separate each degree of latitude/longitude?
 
Are you basically asking how many pixels separate each degree of latitude/longitude?
Errr...kind of (I am a novice to cartography, you see...).

(The question involves all versions of the map, or any versions where their respective values could be given)
 
Errr...kind of (I am a novice to cartography, you see...).
All 2D maps distort in some form. You can’t just divide the pixel width of the map by 360 to get the per-longitude pixel count, for example. It’s going to differ depending on where you are on the map.
 
All 2D maps distort in some form. You can’t just divide the pixel width of the map by 360 to get the per-longitude pixel count, for example. It’s going to differ depending on where you are on the map.
It may be easier to understand my dilemma if I explain how I want to plot points on the map. It will also shed light on my confusion, and will quite likely shed light on my rather poor understanding of cartography...but I digress.

I have acquired the formulation of the Equal Earth projection from this document (see page 3, namely, Equation 1). I am at a loss as to how to use the formulas to plot points on the maps in this thread. I was hoping that maybe someone could explain how to use such formulas, even if it was a mere recommendation that I would need a university-level education to be able to use them.
 
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It may be easier to understand my dilemma if I explain how I want to plot points on the map. It will also shed light on my confusion, and will quite likely shed light on my rather poor understanding of cartography...but I digress.

I have acquired the formulation of the Equal Earth projection from this document (see page 3, namely, Equation 1). I am at a loss as to how to use the formulas to plot points on the maps in this thread. I was hoping that maybe someone could explain how to use such formulas, even if it was a mere recommendation that I would need a university-level education to be able to use them.
As I understand it, the plotting points and lines onto the map is an exercise for your preferred GIS software.
 
As I understand it, the plotting points and lines onto the map is an exercise for your preferred GIS software.
An expected answer, but alright...

What if I want to draw it freehand? Also, cartography of a similar level did exist before computers became widespread...
 
An expected answer, but alright...

What if I want to draw it freehand? Also, cartography of a similar level did exist before computers became widespread...
Again as I understand it, this map is specifically intended for those who don't like the gross inaccuracies and freehand-drawing of the worlda.
 
Again as I understand it, this map is specifically intended for those who don't like the gross inaccuracies and freehand-drawing of the worlda.
I must have communicated my ideas across quite poorly, especially since I myself intend on avoiding the Worlda for those reasons. Also, freehand, or, in this case, non-computerized drawing can produce fairly accurate results when properly following the appropriate formulation, as has been done as far back as the 18th century, if not earlier. Back then, accuracy was mostly limited by lack of knowledge, as the convenience of planes and satellites did not yet exist, as opposed to lack of adequate computers.
 
Hi all, sorry for this thread's long hiatus.

I'd like to start releasing resources that can be used for the production of other EqualX maps, and adding user contributions to the main post. But how do you curate an open-source project? I've been dragging my feet because I've been trying to maintain a consistent EqualX pixel style, which I haven't bothered codifying in full yet. As one might expect, when you have some standards that you think something should live up to, but you don't bother telling anybody about them, not a lot happens. Here's a really basic style guide that I hope to expand later:

upload_2019-11-27_15-51-33.png

1. Avoid perfect diamonds and diagonals
IMO, perfect "diamonds" (four black pixels surrounding a single central pixel) and related shapes (i.e. the Minecraft pickaxe handle) should be avoided in almost all circumstances when doing geographic pixel art: they suggest that the landform being depicted is perfectly round or perfectly rectangular. This is almost never true, so if you look at the EqualAA, much effort has been expended to avoid these shapes. If a small island deviates in any way from a perfect circle, try using extra corner pixels to evoke that. (Same with peninsulas and lakes.)

upload_2019-11-27_15-53-5.png

2. Outline every coloured pixel
For consistency. Don't exaggerate the size of landmasses just so they can hold a single pixel of colour (even though I know you want to). Small islands should be depicted using outline, not fill.

upload_2019-11-27_15-59-6.png

3. Don't use corner pixels, except when you do
Outline pixels should only touch other outline pixels diagonally, unless indicating some sharper bend in the coastline. This is entirely subjective - the idea is to mix it up for effect, while defaulting to the thin side.

As always, it's a public domain project, so I have no earthly power to enforce these guidelines except when it comes to choosing which submissions to include in this thread's first post. To reduce hassle, I can just make these edits myself, but it's quicker if I don't have to. Sorry for not thinking to include them in the earliest iteration of the thread - that was a big omission!!

It may be easier to understand my dilemma if I explain how I want to plot points on the map. It will also shed light on my confusion, and will quite likely shed light on my rather poor understanding of cartography...but I digress.

I have acquired the formulation of the Equal Earth projection from this document (see page 3, namely, Equation 1). I am at a loss as to how to use the formulas to plot points on the maps in this thread. I was hoping that maybe someone could explain how to use such formulas, even if it was a mere recommendation that I would need a university-level education to be able to use them.
These are polynomial functions, which were covered in the first year of my secondary education, whatever that means to everybody who didn't go through the same public school system as me. They turn points on Earth, measured in degrees of latitude (described in the equations as φ) and degrees of longitude (described in the equations as λ), into points on a flat map image (like the EqualAA!), measured in units of x (horizontal space) and y (vertical space). You're correct that these calculations are valid when performed by hand, computers are just faster at them.

Before using the main two equations, your latitude has to be converted into parametric latitude (described in the equations as θ) by using another equation. This is why three equations are provided in the paper for determining two coordinates - the first of the three is a pre-condition of the other two. Because the EqualX maps are not centered on the Greenwich meridian, another precondition is shifting your longitude 11.25 degrees to the west, which is done by subtraction. After this, the rest of the calculation can be handled by any pocket calculator. Here are two homemade graphs of the results, if they help you understand:

Equal Earth latitude.png

Relationship between latitude and vertical position

Equal Earth longitude.png

Relationship between longitude and horizontal position

Note that y depends only on latitude, while x depends on both latitude and longitude.

If nothing else, I hope this illustrates how great it is that hand calculations are largely obsolete.
 
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An insightful post.
Though I had known most of the information given, including an impression that everything becomes crazy when working with longitudes, those graphs are quite useful. I will still proceed with hand calculations, however difficult they may be...mostly because I am lazy at installing a GIS software...but also because there is some joy to create things by hand. I thank you for the post regardless.
 
Is it easy to change the meridian on this map? Is there a centred on Pacific version? Isn't the tiling nature something the equirectangular map is good at (rather than good at nothing?)?
 
I think that in order for this to compete with formats like WorldA and QBAM, a few basemap types are needed, especially for WorldA and WorldAA.

Off the top of my head, I would find these most useful for making maps:

- Topography (mostly done already)
- Rivers (highly needed)
- Climate / Biomes (mostly done already)
- Political 1800ish
- Political WW1 / 1910s
- Political WW2 / 1930s
- Political modern / 2010s (done)
 
upload_2019-12-8_9-23-24.png

Well, right now I'm putting together an EqualD-sized physical map that includes topography, rivers, and coordinates, and that has two azimuth maps to help with the pole distortion problem; and I also intend to make versions centered on the Americas, Asia and Pacific. I'm using DIVA-GIS as a source and I'm using GProjector since I'm not very good with GIS programs... And I'm still at the beginning of this thing (I'm doing coordinates right now), but the topography versions are already done (I have them posted on the WIP Map Thread, just ignore the coordinates they are being redone)
 
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