English Canada/French Carolina: A Timeline

IOTL, the Portuguese monarchy relocated to Rio De Janeiro during the Napoleonic Wars, before returning to Portugal after the war ended, after which Brazil declared independence. ITTL, Portugal and Brazil are still united, but by this point Brazil will have taken an overwhelming advantage in terms of land, population and influence. Any suggestions as to what happens (I might put up a poll) with the relationship between Portugal and Brazil?
Well, here is said poll, does the Portuguese Crown relocate to Brazil?
https://www.strawpoll.me/18991533
 
Part 60: Tail Wagging The Dog
Part 60: Tail Wagging The Dog

Now, we move on to Brazil, the behemoth of South America. While Brazil was still technically a Dominion of Portugal, it was really the tail wagging the dog by now, as Brazil dwarfed its mother country not just in land, but in population as well by 1875, which was only compounded by the acquisition of the region between the Uruguay and Parana rivers during the First Global War. With a population of 9.5 Million (three times as large as the mother country) and a buttload of unsettled land, it was clear that Brazil had a ton of potential to become South America’s juggernaut. The Portuguese King Luis I visited Brazil in 1872, just after the war had ended. He fell in love with the warm climate (although Lisbon doesn’t seem too shabby if I’m being honest) and beautiful green scenery (Portugal isn’t exactly known for drab scenery either), while also being convinced that the power center of the empire had moved from Portugal to Brazil. Thus, the construction of a new royal residence in the hills above Rio (and a city to support it) to be called Lusitania broke ground in 1874, built to be the new primary residence of the Portuguese-Brazilian Royal Family. During this period, the peculiar institution of slavery was being phased out as well, as a law declaring all children of slaves to be born free was passed in 1873 (although it was often unenforced), as well as providing monetary compensation for manumission for slaveholders, as had been done in the British colonies. In 1882, the crown declared that slavery in Brazil would not survive to see the 20th Century, and that full abolition would be complete by 1900.

Inspired by the Dominion Land Act in the Commonwealth of America, the Crown started to encourage settlement of Catholic Europeans in Southern Brazil in order to bolster the population and… yes, to make the population whiter (it was the 19th Century, folks). Between 1875 and 1900, 2.5 million European immigrants arrived in Brazil, primarily from Italy, Portugal, Spain, South Germany and Poland, primarily to farm the fertile lands of the Pampas, work on plantations or settle in the growing cities. With access to the Rio De La Plata (or Rio Da Prata in Portuguese), agricultural goods from the interior could easily be transported down the Uruguay or Paraná rivers to the port of Montevidéu (which had grown explosively to become one of the largest cities in the country) and then exported. The reception of the Royal Relocation in Portugal was basically “well, it was bound to happen at some point'' as even before then it had become clear that the center of the Empire was now in South America. While a few advocated for independence, most just accepted it and moved on (besides, the royal family would visit Portugal at least every few years). Portugal still had an equal status within the Empire as the new Brazilian heartland and still had control over the colonies of Moçambique, Diu and Capricornia (Angola was administered by Brazil).

Thanks to a high birth rate coupled with a surge in immigration, the population of Brazil had grown to 22.3 Million by 1900, with the three largest cities being Rio De Janeiro, Montevidéu and São Paulo. Looking forward from 1900, if Brazil played their cards right, they could end up the superpower of South America, we’ll just have to see.
 
I wonder how large New Orleans could grow ITTL. It's the second city of La Floride (after Richelieu, or OTL's Charleston) at this point in time, but it also happens to be surrounded by a mosquito-filled swamp, which is not the best place to build a metropolis.
 
Part 61: Postbellum
Part 61: Postbellum

The last quarter of the 19th Century would prove to be a time of great change in the French colony of La Floride. The colony had lost a large amount of land to the Commonwealth of America during the war, and the Floridian economy was going to have to go through a large transformation as over two million Afro-Floridian slaves were now being emancipated (although many of them didn’t become anything more than serfs, as happened in OTL’s American South, not to mention that the planter class tried to skirt around emancipation as much as possible, which was also the case in the Post Civil War South). To make this economic and social reorganization more difficult, a certain little pest from Central America began to migrate into the colony during the 1890s, wreaking havoc upon the cotton industry, which was still important even after abolition. In the meantime, industrialization was beginning to take off in certain parts of the country, such as in the towns of Mons (named for an industrial city of that name in Wallonia)and Grande Île. However, the Floridian economy remained largely agricultural, as industry was quite limited when compared to the Commonwealth to the north or even to France itself. This agricultural economy was reflected in the large settlement of Catholic Europeans (Frenchmen and Italians in particular) in the Southern Plains, which soon became the breadbasket of the colony. As the (White) Floridian population continued to grow, rising to 5.24 Million by 1875 (the total population was 8.097 Million), talks of independence began to become commonplace, whether it be a dominion status like that of the Commonwealth, a Personal Union like that of Portugal-Brazil or full-on independence like what South Africa had achieved from the Netherlands.
Immigration, which had averaged 10,000 per year in the 1850s and 15,000 per year in the 1860s before the war grew to 45,000 per year by 1890 and 65,000 by 1900, many settling either as farmers on the frontier or in the growing urban centers. By 1900, the total population of La Floride had grown to 17.15 Million, with a White population of 11.28 Million, a Black population of 4.82 Million, a Mixed Race population of 950,000 and a Native population of 100,000. Richelieu, despite being struck by a devastating earthquake in 1886 had grown to a population of 1.4 Million. As predicted by the original planners, Villeroyale had grown to 165,000 inhabitants by the turn of the 20th Century. New Orleans had been growing rapidly, but it was quickly running out of space due to grow due to its geographic position between Lake Pontchartrain, the Gulf of Mexico and the Bayous of Southern Louisiana, reaching a total population of 550,000 by 1900. As the 20th Century dawned, Florida was looking to no longer be just a colony of a far off land, but to become its own independent nation, and I am looking to start my next update, so I’ve gotta get going now.
 
Interesting TL. A question: When will the CoA become independent from Britain?

Another thing: Will we have a CoA-Floride war about slavery there? When will they abolish it?
 
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Interesting TL. A question: When will the CoA become independent from Britain?

Another thing: Will we have a CoA-Floride war about slavery there? When will they abolish it?
1. They're already independent for the most part, think the relationship between the UK and Canada IOTL.
2. Slavery is on it's way out in La Floride due to the treaty from the previous war, but it is being replaced with serfdom, not unlike sharecropping in OTL's American South. As for another war, it depends on if Britain and France go to war again.
 
1. They're already independent for the most part, think the relationship between the UK and Canada IOTL.
2. Slavery is on it's way out in La Floride due to the treaty from the previous war, but it is being replaced with serfdom, not unlike sharecropping in OTL's American South. As for another war, it depends on if Britain and France go to war again.
But, does America has it's own army and navy?
 
Considering that it's on the other side of the ocean from and has three times the population of the motherland, I'm pretty sure that America would have a separate Army and Navy by 1900.
Canada in our timeline had their own military units for their defense, and to go abroad to fight for Britain, namely the Second Boer War. The Permanent Active Militia, which was essentially the standing army, and the Non-Permanent Active Militia. I'd imagine the Commonwealth has a similar set up.
 
Canada in our timeline had their own military units for their defense, and to go abroad to fight for Britain, namely the Second Boer War. The Permanent Active Militia, which was essentially the standing army, and the Non-Permanent Active Militia. I'd imagine the Commonwealth has a similar set up.
About that, I wonder, what's the CoA part in various wars fought by the UK?
 
Perhaps it splits off into multiple states due to civil conflict thanks to the dreadfully obsolete administration.

I would personally like to see one of the states become one of the most developed countries in Asia and gain a Western army.

Maybe the state that becomes industrialized is Shandong, due to its large population at the time (at about 40 million) and its coastal location making it an excellent place for trade. Also, if it becomes industrialized, it can join Japan in a sort of alliance to keep the rest of China in line and control Asian trade.

What do you think, @Gabingston ?
 
Perhaps it splits off into multiple states due to civil conflict thanks to the dreadfully obsolete administration.

I would personally like to see one of the states become one of the most developed countries in Asia and gain a Western army.

Maybe the state that becomes industrialized is Shandong, due to its large population at the time (at about 40 million) and its coastal location making it an excellent place for trade. Also, if it becomes industrialized, it can join Japan in a sort of alliance to keep the rest of China in line and control Asian trade.

What do you think, @Gabingston ?
Hmm, sounds interesting.
 
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