Empire of Freedom: The History of the American Empire

Do you like this Timeline ?

  • Yes ! For the Empire !

    Votes: 196 86.7%
  • I liked Golden Eagle more

    Votes: 8 3.5%
  • It's okay...

    Votes: 18 8.0%
  • I didn't like it

    Votes: 4 1.8%

  • Total voters
    226
Napoleon can only be in one place at a time. While he is better than every other Coalition general, the same cannot be said for his staff.
 
The result of the Irish campagn appears a bit forced; Ney had territorial advantage, after all, superior forces, and shortest supply line. Yes, Wellslery was a better commander, and he had more trained man, but the Irish fought for theyr home, I think that moral factor should betaken in account; also, the capture of Ney sounds as as a shorcut, a way to free Wellesley for the Iberian campaign.
 
The result of the Irish campagn appears a bit forced; Ney had territorial advantage, after all, superior forces, and shortest supply line. Yes, Wellslery was a better commander, and he had more trained man, but the Irish fought for theyr home, I think that moral factor should betaken in account; also, the capture of Ney sounds as as a shorcut, a way to free Wellesley for the Iberian campaign.
I think the Irish should fight a penninsular war type campaign with guerrilla tactics
 
The result of the Irish campagn appears a bit forced; Ney had territorial advantage, after all, superior forces, and shortest supply line. Yes, Wellslery was a better commander, and he had more trained man, but the Irish fought for theyr home, I think that moral factor should betaken in account; also, the capture of Ney sounds as as a shorcut, a way to free Wellesley for the Iberian campaign.
The Irish army was formed mostly by militias who dispersed after the capture of their central leadership, but it would be naive to think they would already be out of combat. Besides, numbers doesn't mean that much when attacking a much better trained army under a brilliant commander.
 
The Irish army was formed mostly by militias who dispersed after the capture of their central leadership, but it would be naive to think they would already be out of combat. Besides, numbers doesn't mean that much when attacking a much better trained army under a brilliant commander.
It's Nay capture who strike me as forced.
 
XXIII: THE WAR OF THE FIFTH COALITION
XXIII: THE WAR OF THE FIFTH COALITION

IMG_5275.JPG

While Napoleon was distracted in Spain, the Austrian Empire was engaged in reforms to avoid another 1805. Led by the new Commander in Chief, Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen, the Austrian military underwent a massive expansion and adaptation to Napoleonic Tactics. The Austrians adopted a military tactic known as "Mass", a formation of 6 battalions of depth capable of countering cavalry charges while remaining relatively mobile. He also adopted the French "Nation at Arms", introducing conscription and expanding the army to the impressive number of 340,000 men by 1809. But those reforms proved also to be extremely costly, with the Austrian coffers estimated to be emptied by the Mobilization by late 1809, seeing Napoleon in Spain, Archduke Charles was pressured to invade Bavaria on the 8th of February of 1809, starting the War of the Fifth Coalition.

IMG_5276.JPG

Archduke Charles

French Marshal Berthier, commander of the Army of Germany, was completely outmatched by the Austrians, but ever since late 1808, spies warned Napoleon of an impending Austrian invasion, and he started mobilizing forces to counter it. The Austrian invasion started badly, the Army of Bohemia was delayed by a bad climate, allowing Napoleon to reach Bavaria with an army of 200,000 men to add the local forces of Berthier and the Bavarians. Charles led his forces in a campaign on Danube valley, managing to surround Marshal Davout's 3rd Corps in Regensburg, only to suffer an humiliating defeat in Eckmühl that allowed Davout to escape. The Danube river ended up dividing the Austrian forces, allowing Napoleon to take back Regensburg and strike the weakened Southern flank, winning the Battle of Ebersberg and capture Vienna on the 13th of May.

Charles' Army of 130,000 men was stationed on the North of the Villages of Aspern and Essling, and Napoleon's "Grand Army of Germany" started crossing the Danube to meet them. But on the 21st of May, Napoleon's army was attacked before fully crossing the river, with Austrian barges destroying the bridges and halting reinforcements. The French came under heavy attack by an Austrian force almost 4:1 on the twin villages, fighting for two days before being forced to retreat. It was Napoleon's first defeat, with the Austrians proving to the whole world that the Emperor of the French was not invencible, and Charles would pay heavily for that. Another event of these battles was the death of Marshal Lannes, one of Napoleon's best commanders and his personal friend, that would enrage Bonaparte, and he would cross the Danube on the 4th of July to enact his vendetta.

On the 4th of July of 1809, while there were celebrations in the American Empire, the largest Battle in European history up to that moment would happen North of Vienna, with a combined force of 300,000 men meeting at the village of Wagram. Charles started the battle by launching an attack that almost broke the French left, only for a Cavalry charge led by the Emperor himself to break the attack. Napoleon would be shot in the leg, but refused to retreat from the battle, luckily the shot missed the arteries and the bleeding stopped before his life was threatened. Napoleon then ordered a Grand Bombard on the Austrian right, the Mass formation proved itself extremely vulnerable to massed artillery, especially Cannister shots that sprayed in depth. Marshal Davout's 3rd Corps got their revenge on the Austrians, shattering their Right flank and causing the collapse of the Austrian lines, the Austrian forces were routed from the field and Emperor Franz II was forced to sue for peace.

Despite the pleads of the Austrian Chancellor Klemens von Metternich, Bonaparte wanted to punish Austria, making it an example to all Europe. Napoleon planned the dissolution of the Empire, with France annexing the Dalmatia and "Illyrian Provinces", Bavaria took Tyrol, and Poland took Galicia-Londomeria all the way to the Carpathian Mountains. The Austrian Empire was broken in its parts: The Archduchy of Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary, with the Habsburgs keeping the Archduchy but the Hungarian Throne was awarded to Marshal Louis-Nicolas Davout for his impressive display in the campaigns against Prussia and Austria. The mighty Austrian nation was shattered by Napoleon Bonaparte.

IMG_5283.JPG

Louis-Nicolas I Davout, King of the Hungarians
In 1810, with the British pushed to the sea in Iberia and the fighting reduced to Guerrillas, Europe was in relative peace for the first time since the Peace of Amiens.
 
I’m just shocked Austria split up. That is gonna have serious consequences for future German unity if nationalism is still developing for Germans as it did in reality.
 
This is a very nice timeline, there was a lot of events that I didn't predict, like Napolean taking Jerusalem and Ireland or the earlier American civil war. Your descriptions of these already said events are very detailed, and it feels like how a real-life historian would cover them, which I feel really helps the overall aesthetic appeal of this timeline. This is definitely something that I'll want to watch, and I hungrily await for more of this, the only things I don't like about this timeline is that the words are very small and that there aren't more chapters of it.

But I do have a question about this timeline, how far do you want to keep this timeline going, like what date do you think you'll end it at, is this going to end in the 18th, 19th, or even 20th century?

Any comments ?
Isn't America still in the "secret" defensive pact with Napolean? If it is, that would mean that the American civil war might become apart of the war of the fifth coalition, with Britain sending supplies to the Republicans, like what almost happened in our timeline's version of the American civil war. Also, Thomas could affectionally be called by future Americans as "Thomas the conciliator", since he is about to conciliate Canada and the south back into the "fold", is it still called the union in this timeline? Also, what about West Virginia and Nickajack, shouldn't they be fighting for the north, they fought for them in our timeline, they don't own slaves, and their culture is Appalachian, not southern. Then when the war is over, be rewarded for their efforts with statehood, It would be interesting to have Nickajack as a state, even if it is only a little side detail to compliment the narrative.
 
Sorry for not writing for so long guys, these last two weeks have been tense, especially since the National Exams happened here in Brazil. Hopefully I will now be back, and I want to know what do you want first: The end of the Civil War, Selim III not being a dumb coward, or Napoleon and Russia ?
 
Top