Empire of Freedom: The History of the American Empire

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Antonio the Komnenoi, Oct 10, 2019.

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Do you like this Timeline ?

  1. Yes ! For the Empire !

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  2. I liked Golden Eagle more

    7 vote(s)
    4.3%
  3. It's okay...

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  4. I didn't like it

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  1. ThecrownPrince Well-Known Member

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    Apr 24, 2018
    Just some speculation for the future and a interesting device you could use. But napoleons marshals especially towards the epitome of the empire were increasingly in competition with each other to the point davout and Bernadotte almost dueled(Davout thought that Bernadotte purposely sabotaged him). Perhaps if the infighting goes unchecked it could be a nice dagger towards the Corsicans back. Not to mention since In Otl Bernadotte and Murat betrayed Napoleon once he was on the back foot.

    The ottomans are going to need to modernize a lot faster if they intend to keep Crimea in the face of Russia. Now that Russia’s back in the continental system I don’t see why Napoleon would want to get his shoes muddy in another Russo Turkish war.
     
  2. The Congressman Well-Known Member

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    Napoleon Bonaparte and Thomas Marshall, twin leaders of the Pact of the Dual Empires.
     
  3. Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    Sweats in British
     
  4. [totally a legit person] [totally not an bot]

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    United in a union of *freedom and a system of *democracy, with a common purpose of turning Britain's behind beat red.
     
  5. GenghisKhanfan Alternate History guru

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    Now that's a twist I don't think anyone has done....Don Carlos escaping to Mexico. But couldn't it also go a different way, such as Don Carlos sets up his own monarchy in New Spain, as Don Pedro did in Brazil? Or.....and I hope I'm not overstepping here.....maybe Don Carlos sets up a Royal Union of Spain (in exile?), Mexico and Central America
     
  6. GenghisKhanfan Alternate History guru

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    Not to mention the fact that IOTL Bernadotte went on to become King of Sweden and participated in the 'Battle of the Nations' at Leipzig. Murat did betray Napoleon, not once but twice. When it looked like France would regain the advantage, he grovelled before Napoleon, but then went behind his back again and negotiated with Austria to keep his throne in exchange for the expedition of Neapolitan troops to assist the Austrians in clearing nothern Italy of French troops and defeat Prince Eugene de Beauharnais. Perhaps Davout could do the same thing in Hungary...make an arrangement with the Austrians (albeit more limited than what Murat received) and turn against Napoleon....and maybe Murat could actually keep his thone in Naples.
     
  7. GenghisKhanfan Alternate History guru

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    I was surprised the Ottomans didn't gain more out of that, such as Kiev. They could've placed the Cossacks under their protection as they had done the Crimean Tatars and introduced the real possibility that Islam might gain a greater hold in Russia.
     
  8. Rheinbund Well-Known Member

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    For that Napoleon need to loose badly, really badly, Murat and Davout have no reason to betray him right now, also Davout was always loyal and was awarded with Hungary due to his action, increasing his recognition for the empire.
     
  9. ThecrownPrince Well-Known Member

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    I agree with davout not betraying Napoleon but with big personalities like davout and Murat on the battlefield conflicts and infighting are bound to happen probably leading to brash and reckless leadership(in attempts to out due each other), compromising Napoleon on the battle feild.
     
  10. GenghisKhanfan Alternate History guru

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    @ThecrownPrince: It could be that competition that leads either Davout or Murat (or both) to seek an arrangement with Austria.

    What I'm waiting to see now is how the butterflies introduced (such as the French invasion and successful conquest of Ireland, and America's conquest of Canada) will affect Napoleon's relations with Piedmont, Portugal, and especially the Ottoman Empire.
     
  11. G-6 Well-Known Member

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    What the status of French navy?
     
  12. Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    Theoretically intact (mostly), but too afraid of leaving the port.
     
  13. G-6 Well-Known Member

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    What going on with Spain and Britain while Napoleon defeating Russia?
     
  14. Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    Things are going bad in Spain, I will deal with it in a future chapter.
     
  15. G-6 Well-Known Member

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    Will Spain be the downfall of France even with Russia defeated?
     
  16. Threadmarks: XXIX: EL TERROR FRANCO

    Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    XXIX: EL TERROR FRANCO

    12084E9F-364F-4BFA-A00F-7C83605C598B.jpeg
    Spanish painting depicting one of the retaliatory executions ordered by Marshal Bellegarde

    Louis Alexandre François Bellegarde, born on the 3rd of September of 1779 in the town of Bellegarde near the city of Orleans, grew up in a violent household with an alcoholic father and envious brothers. After his mother died when he was 5, he was sent to the local catholic school, where he showed an amazing talent in mathematics and history. In 1789, his school was nationalized by the new government and he entered in contact with revolutionary ideas, becoming a Jacobin by the time Robespierre took power in 1793. As the Jacobin government fell, he joined the military school in Paris, showing himself to be absolutely ruthless, claiming that only through the infliction of unspeakable terror would an unwillingly population fall in line. At the age of 19, he left the school and joined the Army that invaded Egypt, entering first in contact with Napoleon, becoming a close friend of his and even offering advice during the conquest of Acre and Jerusalem. He left the army with Napoleon as one of his aides, becoming the commander of an Infantry regiment after the coup of the 18th Brumaire, being part of the Battle of Marengo. He returned to the military school where he finished his graduation by the time of the 1805 campaign. After showing prowess (and getting the favor of the Emperor), the 27-year old Bellegarde became a division commander by the time of the Irish campaign, known for his brutal yet effective actions against rebellious locals in Northern Ireland during the siege of Belfast. Once more he was promoted to General after taking a bullet for the Emperor during the Battle of Dublin, and he started to attract the envy of other commanders, they claimed his aggressive tactics and terror treatment to rebels and deserters gave a bad image to the French Army who were trying to be liberators, besides they believed he didn’t earn his promotions and was only there due to the friendship with Bonaparte. In 1809, he joined Napoleon in the 5th Coalition War, showing great military skill in an skirmish, defeating an Austrian force the double of his size by outmaneuvering and charging the enemy forces, shattering them. General Bellegarde, now only at the age of 32, accompanied Napoleon in Borodino, receiving the honor of leading the 30,000 men of the Imperial Guard in the decisive attack that broke the Russian right. Upon his return, he received his Marshal Baton, becoming Marshal of the French Empire.

    While Bellegarde was making his rise and the Tsar surrendered to Napoleon, Joseph Bonaparte, King of Spain and brother of Napoleon, continued his struggle to control his country. The war zone that was once called Iberian peninsula was divided between French and Coalition control, with the French controlling Madrid, North, and Eastern Spain, while the Coalition controlled Galicia, Portugal, Andalusia, Granada and Murcia. King Carlos VI, ruled from Ciudad de México in exile, pouring the resources of the New World into a total war to retake his throne, while Arthur Wellesley led a combined Anglo-Portuguese force picking up the French one by one. Iberia had costed not just lives but also reputation and prestige of the Empire, with Commanders like Junot, Soult and Masséna being humiliated by Wellesley. The French also had to deal with the local population in several areas, where guerrillas fought the French, attacking supply lines and tying down over 200,000 forces, something had to be done to end “Napoleon’s Ulcer”.

    As the year of 1812 arrived, Wellesley’s force prepared to finish up the war at once, hoping for a decisive battle under his terms would end the Stalemate in Iberia and hopefully another coalition would be assembled to end the Corsican’s dominion over Europe. The Battle of Salamanca in February 1812 was just what the commander desired, beating the Franco-Spanish force of Joseph Bonaparte and shattering his army, opening the road to Madrid. King Joseph attempted to escape after the battle, only for him and his guard to be ambushed by guerrillas. The guerrilla fighters who killed Napoleon’s brother arrived ahead of Wellesley in Madrid, spreading the news that the French tyrant was dead and parading his head on a pike. Wellesley was disgusted by what happened, but the death of Joseph after Salamanca changed the Iberian balance of power, just not how the British expected.

    Napoleon felt his legs failing him, cold sweat and the feeling of nausea covering him as he read every word of the report on the situation in Iberia. His aides had to hold him as he almost passed out, he had just received the News that Madrid was lost and his brother with it. “They... paraded his head on a pike ?” “Yes sire, his body was mutilated and burned in public, his head is decorating the entrance of the city.” Told him the courier. Napoleon was filled first with sadness and desperation, and upon hearing that, with anger and hate, for the Spanish, Wellesley, Carlos, all of them. And as his army of Veterans arrived in Paris victorious, with celebrations happening over the city that was now the center of Europe, he wanted nothing but revenge, he wanted those Spaniards to feel the fury of the French Golden Eagle who had just smashed the Russian Bear. “Call me Marshal Bellegarde.”

    On the 24th of March of 1812, Bellegarde was given orders of Napoleon, he would march down into Spain with an army of 200,000 Elite Veterans straight from the Austrian and Russian Campaigns. The death of Joseph gave the Throne of Spain back to Napoleon, who promised it to Bellegarde if he managed to beat back the English. His army arrived in Valladolid on the 1st of May, after marching across Northeastern Spain and brutally putting down militias. Wellesley heard of the incident and refused to allow another 1808 to happen, when Napoleon managed to beat him back from Zaragoza to Portugal, and so he ordered a retreat, only to receive an stern refusal of King Carlos VI. Carlos was on his way to Europe (again) to make an triumphal march in Madrid and better coordinate the Spanish efforts in Iberia. The Anglo-Portuguese army wouldn’t risk destruction due to the whims of a King and retreated back to Portugal, leaving the Spanish to defend Madrid.

    José Palafox led an united Spanish force, including from regulars to guerrillas and militias, in the defense of Madrid against Bellegarde’s assault. The 67,000 Spanish force was shattered by the fast and ferocious assault of Bellegarde’s 83,000 in one of the most lopsided defeats in Spanish history, 31,000 Spanish casualties compared to only 5,000 French ones. The situation in Iberia returned to a pre-Salamanca setting, but it wouldn’t remain like that as Bellegarde moved to secure the south, when King Carlos received the news and was forced to evacuate from Spain a third time and further mobilize more resources from the colonies to free the homeland. Córdoba, Seville and Cadiz fell in a quick succession to the French, with Marshal Suchet capturing Murcia on the 5th of July and ending the Spanish control over Southern Spain.

    What followed was an intensive anti-guerrilla campaign unseen before in history, with the French acting more as Barbarians than a Professional army. Bellegarde gave direct orders to murder and burn entire villages with rebel sympathizers, if one family had at last one of its members as a “guerrilheiro”, it was enough to for all members receive a quick execution. There were no prisoners when a guerrilla was found, and as retaliation for the killing of Joseph, the city of Córdoba ran out of pikes. Bellegarde took the methods straight from Robespierre’s book, and the guilhotine was working 24 hours a day to handle the executions, including of General Palafox himself. It is estimated that what the Spaniards called “El Terror Franco” killed between 30 to up to 70 thousand men and women, and at least 4,000 children in Granada alone. Entire farms were sacked from their supplies to feed the French army, and Bellegarde now set his eyes on Portugal, preparing his army into a new campaign, he ended clashing with Massena, who called his methods “Jacobin” and wrote to Napoleon requesting his transference, as he didn’t want to associate himself with Bellegarde’s tactics and neither did Marshal Suchet. Napoleon transferred them both back to Paris, as the “Spanish situation” was the only front of the war. When he arrived, Massena asked Napoleon if he heard of Bellegarde’s reign of terror, and if he would do something about it. The furious but calm Bonaparte replied that “That’s precisely why I sent him.” Massena left without saying another word, retiring from his position and living in his Estate.

    The news spread to Portugal, where the Portuguese population entered in panic, as the new French Barbaric Horde marched through the south, capturing the Algarves and marching North to Lisbon. Wellesley retreated his army to the city, holding the Impressive line of fortifications North of Lisbon, the Linha de Torres Veras defended by Wellesley was the definition of immovable object, while Bellegarde was the definition of unstoppable force, and they were about to clash in the Battle of Lisbon, on the 18th of August of 1812.

    7BDB68E5-A529-4F0E-8373-70B95BF6387D.jpeg
    Battle of Lisbon, also called the Battle of Torres Veras

    The battle started with massive artillery barrages. The French army of Bellegarde was composed of 123,000 men pulled from all Spain (since much of the resistance was brutally crushed for the moment) and centered around a core of Russian campaign veterans. While the Anglo-Portuguese force of 78,000 was outnumbered, the two defensive lines more than compensated it, with the Royal Navy providing fire support to repeal several charges along the day. The first day of battle was over with the French back to where they started with 18,000 losses. The second day was more successful as a weaker spot was found in the first line, the massive charge with support of cavalry and artillery eventually broke the first line and the Anglo-Portuguese forces were forces to retreat to the second line. Wellesley made his stand there on the third day, repealing charge after charge of French forces, using the reverse sloop to protect his men from artillery fire. On the 4th day, Bellegarde changed his tactic, instead he brought over 3,000 women and children to the frontlines, captured from the countryside during the disorganized evacuation of the Portuguese South. He delivered an ultimatum for Wellesley to retreat or 3,000 civilians would be killed from all Portugal every day. For 2 days the heads and blood rolled, and eventually the Portuguese forces were tired of watching their countrymen (and even families) killed, ordering a charge against Wellesley’s orders, falling straight into Bellegarde’s trap, the French defeated the Portuguese and pursued them into a 4th charge against the line, the disorganized Portuguese couldn’t hold back the French, but the British forces under Arthur Wellesley and Bereaugard (British Governor of Portugal) held them off. After a week of battle, and over 50,000 dead in both sides, the British evacuated Lisbon, filling over 70 ships with refugees to the point that one of them capsized. Over 40,000 Portuguese civilians, plus 30,000 British troops were evacuated, leaving Lisbon to be sacked, burned and razed by the French Horde. At last, the Peninsula War was over in the most brutal way possible, with the Portuguese refugees taken to Brazil, Iberia was put under the control of King Louis I Bellegarde, with the French taking control of Catalonia. With the war over, Bellegarde went back to Madrid, toning down on his brutal tactics as he now had a Nation to rule.

    Now Albion was alone, with the French and their Continental system controlling from Iberia to the Urals, the entire continent was united under one man: Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019 at 4:09 PM
  17. Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    Comments are welcome, I also warn that this chapter can be kinda brutal too.
     
  18. TheJ New Member

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    May 22, 2019
    Damn.
     
  19. Antonio the Komnenoi Emperor of America

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    An appropriate reaction.
     
  20. ThecrownPrince Well-Known Member

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    Apr 24, 2018
    Not even the Americans can turn a blind eye to these atrocities. I suspect souring relations.
     
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