Earliest possible Kingdom of Great Britain?

As Bobbins said earlier, Aethelstan already attained the status, if not the title, of High-King of Great Britain. However, assuming history continues as IOTL until 1660, the Restoration of Charles II offers the chance to formally unite England and Scotland politically. After all, the Act of Union was only 47 years later in 1707.

Theoretically, England and Scotland were already united in 1660-its a strangely ambiguous bit of British history that always seems to be forgotten about that England, Ireland and Scotland were formally united under the Cromwellian Commonwealth. When the monarchy was restored it just seemed to get brushed under the carpet and allowed to lapse. Charles II could have set about clarifying and reforming it, but explicitly not abolishing it (or more explicitly, endorsing the unified Commonwealth even as he turned it back into a Kingdom)
 
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However, assuming history continues as IOTL until 1660, the Restoration of Charles II offers the chance to formally unite England and Scotland politically.
They were during the Commonwealth so all it needs is to confirm the existing reality rather than turn the clock back to before the Civil Wars.
 
They were during the Commonwealth so all it needs is to confirm the existing reality rather than turn the clock back to before the Civil Wars.

Its an historical oddity-im not aware of there actually being a formal abolition of the Commonwealth and yet everyone involved in the restoration just pretended it never happened.
 
Maybe, but remember if England and Scotland are united earlier ITTL under peaceful means, France may ought to try and form a Auld Alliance with Ireland here lets say even if it is a backwater as you and Edward I would be aware of this and would likely want to make sure all the British isles are secure from any French influence. With lets say a combined England/Scottish/Welsh and Irish army now at Edward I's disposal, France will be terrified that such a combined force can not only match them but maybe have them defeated with could have major butterflies for French and British history. Such a fascinating concept that really needs to be adapted more for ATL's.
Ireland at this date wasn't united, and none of the little kingdoms there could offer a comparable threat to Scotland. I'm not even sure it would make sense to use it as a base to attack England, given how much closer England was to France itself.
 
I think an earlier union under Edward II and Margaret would be interesting, especially on relations between France and Britain.
People keep talking about British-French rivalries, and France trying to create some kind of Auld Alliance with someone. That just seems very anachronistic, and using later history to define earlier history.

As an example, prior to Edward I and his wars in Scotland, Scotland and England had had an extended period of excellent relations. It was only the turmoil of Edward I's wars in Scotland that created the impetus for Auld Alliance.

Meanwhile, while the English Angevins always had tension with their Capet French overlords/peers, (feudal overlords by this point in Gascony during the reign of Edward I) it was really the marriage of Edward II and Isabella of France, and the dynastic claim she passed to Edward III, that gave rise to the 100 years war.

If you create a union of England and Scotland through the successful marriage of Edward II and Margaret, you likely avoid the troubles of the Scottish wars of independence, the creation of the Auld Alliance and centuries of warfare between Scotland and England, and avoid some tensions between England and France.

A successful union post-Edward II will likely strengthen the two countries, but its not likely to pose an existential threat to the Capetians. There will still almost certainly be wars between France and England, but they would be more localized to Gascony and Flanders. Britain might successfully take Flanders, or it might not. But without the claim the English Angevins advanced through Isabella, they will not necessarily be an existential threat to the French crown. They just continue to be one of France's very dangerous over-mighty vassals, in their capacity as rulers of Gascony and the economic ties they had to Flanders.

Depending on how the wars shake out, Britain and France may not have the long term rivalry we had OTL. Britain is still much underpopulated compared to France, and French Kings may develop a good system of just buying off British kings with stipends.
 
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Maybe, but remember if England and Scotland are united earlier ITTL under peaceful means, France may ought to try and form a Auld Alliance with Ireland here lets say even if it is a backwater as you and Edward I would be aware of this and would likely want to make sure all the British isles are secure from any French influence. With lets say a combined England/Scottish/Welsh and Irish army now at Edward I's disposal, France will be terrified that such a combined force can not only match them but maybe have them defeated with could have major butterflies for French and British history. Such a fascinating concept that really needs to be adapted more for ATL's.
Ireland at this date wasn't united, and none of the little kingdoms there could offer a comparable threat to Scotland. I'm not even sure it would make sense to use it as a base to attack England, given how much closer England was to France itself.
Not only was Ireland fractured, but the late-13th century was arguably the apex of the Anglo-Norman lordship of Ireland. The Black Death and Bruce invasion (the latter of which would surely be butterflied away in ATL) that hobbled the lordship and led to the Gaelic resurgence are still decades away.

It is much more likely that France would seek out a Welsh alliance if they wanted to threaten England on its home turf. We saw them do exactly this in OTL during times when Scotland was unwilling or unable to go to war the 1370s and 1400s. An Edward II-Maid of Norway POD is also barely a generation removed from Llywelyn the Great and Welsh independence would be within living memory of a majority of Welsh and Englishmen alike.
 
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