Dominion of Southern America - Updated July 1, 2018

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Glen, Feb 22, 2010.

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  1. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    That's important to know. Obviously the facts on the ground ITTL's Southern America are quite different...
     
  2. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Thanks! I would have thought so, too, but the geopolitics of the time in the end dictated that the Northwest Company would have resisted inclusion of Gray's Island and everything west and north of it in the farmers' new state. And given the amount of territory they did gain, it made sense to put some limits. Also, Congress is looking forward to a time when MacKenzie will become a state, and without those more southern regions, it would be a poorer state overall.

    From me? Eventually. However, one of our wonderful mapmakers might take up the challenge ahead of time (hint, hint, everyone!)...
     
  3. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Good to know.

    English probably, though I wouldn't rule out Spanglish.:)

    :eek:

    Good question. Don't know much about the 19th century ice trade.

    So far we've just had the crop failures from known potato diseases and weather. It remains to be seen whether the blight will make an appearance soon, or what the English reaction will be....

    Yep, sure will.
     
  4. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Points made!
     
  5. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Wow, that does sound like a lot of work to accomplish this.
     
  6. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Hmmm, Hispaniola as Tea Capital of the West Indies....has promise!
     
  7. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

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    I might take a swing at a map in a few updates. I admit to being deeply curious to what the Western and Canadian states will look like when done... Mississippi really thre me a curve!
     
  8. Eurofed Banned

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    Well, even in this USA, the northernmost parts of Canada (except Alaska and Yukon, after the gold rush) are indeed going to remain largley as empty as IOTL. But both the OTL US and the Canadian Rockies and Plains are going to become more popolous than OTL, and southern Canada to become roughly as popolous as northern US states, simply because the USA is still going to receive a lot of European immigrants, the other areas can absorb only so many people, and the pressure to open up free space in the West and North is going to drive the construction of the necessary infrastructures.
     
  9. Venusian Si Well-Known Member

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    While I understand your point, the idea [or perhaps it's the wording] that any region in America could reach that point comes off as odd from an American perspective. Admittedly, one could argue that's what helped caused Manhatten's population decline, but it seems like what you're talking about won't happen until the invention of Suburbia,...and even then, the Canadian West lacks a lot of conditions that made the Sunbelt such a popular destination choice among Northern Americans.
     
  10. eschaton Muckraker & Rabblerouser

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    I really don't get your point here. Why are you claiming TTL's USA will see much more immigration? I mean, it could, provided immigration restrictions don't pass similar to OTL's 1920s. But up until then (Chinese exclusion act aside) there was nothing stopping as many people from coming to the U.S. as wanted. The only way to boost U.S. immigration dramatically upward would be if things were far worse in portions of Europe, which would make more people want to leave.

    The other way I could read what you mean is that since the U.S. doesn't have the South, all those migrants need to go somewhere else in the U.S. But IOTL they didn't go to the South. Most of the South, after an early smattering of Germans, received essentially no immigrants, with the one notable exception being New Orleans. Of course, Southern California is also in the DSA, but this area will see immigration regardless. Add to that the DSA being more of a draw to immigrants than OTL's South, and if anything, I'd say immigration will be slightly reduced compared to OTL's "North" + Canada. This is before even taking into effect Latin America, where a stronger Mexico and UPSA could snap up a lot of migrants - possibly enough to cancel out no Brazil and then some.
     
  11. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    The Gitchigumee Territory has a long and odd story in American history. Located as it is on the north shore of Lake Superior (indeed, 'Gitchigumee' itself means 'Big Water' and is an American Indian term for the Lake it abuts), it is a long strip of the great north that developed through two major historical forces; fur trapping and relocation of 'Uncivilized' Indians.

    Even in colonial times, the lands around the Great Lakes were prime fur areas, with both the Hudson Bay Company and the North West (later Northwest) Company vying for control of the area (until the Hudson Bay Company essentially lost the battle). A network of trappers and traders developed in the region, connecting northern Indian tribes with white trappers and traders, many of whom intermarried and their descendants, the Métis, became the dominant force in trading in the Lakes Region. As wildlife become more scarce and settlers moved in to the more southern regions around the Great Lakes, the Métis traders either moved on or settled down themselves, but the poor soil and harsher weather of the north shore of Lake Superior acted as a barrier against such change, especially with the vast north of the Hudson Territory just beyond to continue to provide furs for trade. These predominantly Francophone Métis would play an important role in the future of the Gitchigumee.

    [​IMG]

    While many natives of the USA east of the Mississippi eventually accepted assimilation and joined more or less the mainstream of American society, intermarrying with settlers of European extraction, some refused to conform to American 'civilization' and instead were forced to relocate by America's military, the Legion. At first, only a few tribes were moved to the far north, while most were moved west, predominantly west of the Mississippi. However, it soon became US policy to resettle all tribes to the Hudson Territory in the far north, including those who had previously been removed to West of the Mississippi if they would not accept American ways. The land that formed the Gitchigumee was not officially part of the Hudson Territory given it drained into Lake Superior rather than Hudson Bay, and so originally was part of the old Northwest Territory. Instead of being a settlement for Indian Tribes, the Gitchigumee became a weystation between the rest of the United States and the tribes of the Hudson Territory. Some Indians did choose to stay in the Gitchigumee, those who at the last moment regretted their decision to accept exile in the far north. Those who did go on to the Hudson Territory faced long, fierce winters, but were free to practice their way of life without interference from the Americans to the South, and could bring some of civilization's comforts to their people through continued fur trade with the Métis of the Gitchigumee (and to a lesser extent, hardy Quebeckers along the border). This trade kept the Gitchigumee a viable economy, supplemented by fishing on Lake Superior and dairy farming later, as well as money from the Federal Government for working as Indian Agents. Indeed, the entire administration of the Hudson Territory was run out of the Gitchigumee Territory.

    Gitchigumee Territory and Lake Superior:

    Gitchigumee.PNG
     
  12. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Ah, well then you will find the Gitchigumee post interesting!
     
  13. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

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    Hooray! Our first major possibably new Canadian State!

    Gitchigumee is certainly a mouthful though... Can't wait to see more!
     
  14. Astronomo2010 Well-Known Member

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    well USA is becoming a superpower in terms of territory and population.:)
     
  15. stevep Member

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    Glen

    That sounds nasty.:eek: The deportations OTL caused a lot of deaths but dumping all the Indians in the sub-arctic is going to really screw them. [Unless by accept American ways that is a genuine alternative rather than the OTL - we want you're lands so you're going]. Even the Gitchigumee region I think is pretty poor and barren, part of the Canadian shield that hindered access to the prairies, mainly marshy forest.

    Could there be a chance that a lot of Indians, when they are forced to move or earlier, when they see the writing on the wall, try and escape south to the DSA? If so what would their treatment be?

    Steve
     
  16. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    It does sound nasty - and it is!:mad: But it is less so than the Trail of Tears of OTL. The choice to assimilate is a genuine one ITTL, as opposed to the false promises of OTL. For example, much of upstate New York and Ontario still possess their Indian populations who opted to assimilate (by which we mean they give up communal land ownership (but can make individual land claims like anyone else!), and they accept US citizenship and follow US laws and pay US taxes. Many also convert (predominantly to one of the Deist denominations!) though this is not a requirement to stay on the land. It is only the die-hards who refuse to pay allegiance to the US who actually are relocated.

    But yes, the land is marginal at best - for farming. However, the actual numbers moving are relatively small, and those who are adept (or can become so) at hunting-gathering can survive there. It is a hard life, and there are many deaths among initial arrivals (and also a reason why many drift back into the Gitchigumee to resettle - they usually can't afford to go further at least at first).

    There was some movement of indians south to what would become Indiana around the late 18th early 19th century, but quite frankly, anyone willing to take up life among the Civilized Tribes probably would have been fine taking the pledge and staying put (though some didn't realize it at the time). The undefeated 'uncivilized' native Americans continue to retreat farther and farther west. That's one reason the Indian Wars grow more and more difficult, as seasoned, bitter veterans take their experience to the Plains.
     
  17. stevep Member

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    Glen

    That makes a big difference. I suspect the bulk of the remaining eastern tribes will assimilate under those conditions. Was fearing it was a case of the US making a deal until they wanted to take the land anyway.

    Steve

     
  18. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    It does - it's still playing hardball on a cultural level, but people at least have a chance at a decent life. Better than OTL I would agree.
     
  19. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Yes, this is quite true. No time for now to put it together, but maybe someone else might (hint hint) - if not, I will eventually get one together.
     
  20. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    I agree that there will be a greater portion of US immigration going to the north than OTL, but it may be that the winner are the regions that were the northern US states of OTL - but time will tell...