Dominion of Southern America - Updated July 1, 2018

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Glen, Feb 22, 2010.

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  1. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Numerous is relative. Ezochi in general is still a sparsely populated land, but there are more Ainu there ITTL than there was this same time IOTL. And that isn't counting the mixed marriages between Ainu and both Japanese and Russians, which are significant.
     
  2. Iserlohn Amateur Cartographer

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    Bumping because of four days without update etc...
     
  3. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    My apologies for the long absence from updates on this timeline. I have been very caught up at work plus needing to find certain pictures for the next updates. Probably sometime next week we will start to get this back on track. I appreciate everyone's interest and time spent here.
     
  4. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    What the Slaver Uprising did for blacks in the British South, the Global War, in part, did for subcontinental Indians living in the Dominion of Southern America. Often referred to in aggregates as 'Hindoos' even though the people brought over as indentured servants in the wake of slave abolition practiced numerous faiths, the subcontinental Indians had been seen as little more than lowly workers and aliens, not part of the Southern Culture proper, which while stratified, had a place for whites, blacks, and so called 'civilized indians' (who of course were not from India, but from America).

    However, the Mexican invasion made for strange bedfellows, as the overwhelmingly Catholic and Spanish speaking Mexicans had even less use for the subcontinentals than the South. Several brave men took up arms to represent their race in the defense of the Empire. One such man was Rhajini Sikhail. His family had been brought to Southern Albion to work on the railways, and after settling their indenture settled as subsistance farmers in the region. Sikhail took to the hills and pulled together several of his family and friends into a partisan fighting force when the Mexicans occupied the region. His hard scrabble force were among those who marched into San Diego when the Royal Navy liberated the port. He and his band were recognized by Her Majesty's government as auxillaries to the British Army and continued the fight, launching raids into Mexico that kept several units of Mexican regulars occupied for the remainder of the war. After the war he returned to private life and enjoyed the hard won respect he and 'Sikhail's Boys' had earned with blood. He went on to become a successful local politician, becoming the first subcontinental mayor in the Dominion, of his small hometown which was renamed after his death - Sikhail, Albion, DSA.

    A photograph of Rhajini Sikhail and his surviving men after the repulsing of the Mexican invasion.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

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    Sikhs of the Dominion? Oh joy :D
     
  6. Iserlohn Amateur Cartographer

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    Fascinating... I wonder if auxilliaries like these will allow Southern America to remain liberal-ish or maybe go down a similiar route to South Africa OTL, seeing how the similiarities grow (subcontinental lawyers, anyone ;)?)
     
  7. stevep Member

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    Iserlohn

    I suspect its going to stay liberal. There is enough history of co-operation, plus the influence of both Britain and the neighbouring US. Any attempt to go along the South African path would have too many people opposed to it while also the assorted minorities [who may actually form a majority] already have a large measure of rights and its more difficult to remove such rights than to deny them to people who have never had them.

    Steve
     
  8. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Basically, yeah!
     
  9. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    It's got some similarities to South Africa, but others are not. I would say it will continue on its 'soft racism' trajectory, barring unforeseen (at least by our dear readers) incidents....
     
  10. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    You make some very salient points there, steve. On the other hand we've seen rights stripped away in other historical situations so it's not impossible.
     
  11. Cylon_Number_14 Nothing Unreal Exists

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    That was a very tasty vignette of the Global War. I know it's obvious, but I gotta say again that your use of readers' alt-ancestors has been one of the greatest selling points of your TL. Especially because you don't merely throw them in as a gimmick, but come up with some really cool Tales of the Dominion with the characters!
     
  12. Beedok I exist.

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    I do wonder if Quebecois Separatism will ever rear up in this timeline. How is French doing in the *USA?
     
  13. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Thank you very much. I really appreciate people loaning me the names of themselves and their families. It makes for some more interesting character names and histories, adding a dash of flavor AND versimilitude. Sometimes they are of use for historical figures that I need, and sometimes they inspire historical figures as well.

    I am probably going to do a few this week, and have more non-personality driven updates next week.
     
  14. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    While the father of the Republic of Hungary may rightly be considered Lajos Kossuth, another who could rightly claim the title of Founding Father of the Republic is Peter Molnár, the second President of the Republic according to some historians, or the first according to others. Kossuth had been elevated to President of the Provisional Government of Hungary on his return from exile. However, Kossuth's failing health after his elevation to the post did not allow him much time or energy to participate in the drafting of the constitution. It was Peter Molnár who would lead this great work and see the nation through to the 20th century. Peter Molnár was a young dissident from a literary family (Hungarian on his father's side, Slovakian on his mother's side) in the Austro-Hungarian Empire who became radicalized against the constraints and anti-individualism of Korsgaardianism as it became the guiding philosophy of the ancient regime. Imprisoned on numerous occasions, most recently at the outbreak of the Global War as a 'potential security risk', Molnár was among the prisoners freed by the uprising. He rose to prominance for his articulate and clear way of expressing the ideals of the revolution, and his personal devotion to liberal individualist rights, in diametric opposition to the Korsgaardism that had come before. He chaired the drafting of the Hungarian Constitution, heavily borrowing from the American constitution but adapting it to the conditions as they prevailed in the Hungarian territory. Minority rights, such as for the Slovaks, and religious freedoms including for protestants and jews, were vouchsafed. The most controversial part of the constitution was female suffrage, but Molnár saw it as an essential step forward for the nation. Kossuth died before the completion of the constitution, and Peter Molnár was raised in his place as the second President of the Provisional Government. He subsequently won the first Presidential Elections under the new constitution. As president, he counseled reconciliation with the landed classes and former Korsgaardist bureaocrats, bringing to a halt the backlash and persecution these former masters of Austria-Hungary (though many of the more prominant of the former regime were banned from public office for years, the restrictions not being eased until the 20th century). Although a classic liberal himself, Peter Molnár sought to position the Hungarian Republic as a good and honest neighbor, interested in trade and cultural exchange regardless of prevailing political party of his neighbors (particularly important in the case of Russia). Molnár also saw to it that Hungary was one of the first nations of Eastern Europe to embrace the Poe Plan to bolster the post-war economy. He also sought to keep Hungary truly neutral, much in keeping with the model set over a century before by George Washington. However, much as Vegetius counseled, Peter Molnár led his government to build up a strong defensive military (referred to as the Hungarian Legion, purposely mirroring the name of the American military). It is interesting to note that he also was a strong proponent of air power, building up an airship force for the military and even promoting a civilian air service. Several of the younger officers from the former Austro-Hungarian navy would migrate to the air services, giving it a decidedly nautical feel and terminology.

    For these and so many other reasons, many historians consider Peter Molnár as the man who created the Republic of Hungary.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Emperor-of-New-Zealand It's a figure of speech

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    Awesome! :D
     
  16. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    A very fair question. Francophones are doing well in the far northern states. Separatism as we know it will not show at all - there's been no real impetus to leave the Union.
     
  17. Umbric Man Umbric Manned

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    How common is English in these northern states by contrast? Can you go about Quebec and Gitchigumchee and northern Ontario with just English and people won't be too bothered, if at all?
     
  18. AStanley Banned

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    How big will this Hungary be?

    Ethnic Hungary or Greater Hungary?
     
  19. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Thank you!
     
  20. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    It depends. If you're in the big city, almost everyone is bilingual to some degree. If you go out into the countryside, most will be French-speaking but not very many English-speaking. You may also run into some people speaking German various Scandinavian languages or native American languages.