Dixieland: The Country of Tomorrow, Everyday (yet another Confederate TL)

With the United States basically closing off most immigration have Dominicans started to fill the void with the lack of any serious labor competition?
Eh, it's probably around half. Catholic immigration isn't gone, though its a fraction of OTL. That's still a lot of immigrants. And in the era, there were still tons of British, Scandinavian, and North German immigrants. Add in white Confederates and I think they're pretty set on labour.
 
Eh, it's probably around half. Catholic immigration isn't gone, though its a fraction of OTL. That's still a lot of immigrants. And in the era, there were still tons of British, Scandinavian, and North German immigrants. Add in white Confederates and I think they're pretty set on labour.
French Canadians were a major Catholic immigrant group that people often forget about. Many moved to New England to find work in mills around this time, and others settled in border areas, where they tended to retain their Francophone towns (and still do in some places). Were there restrictions on Quebecois before the war? If not, the incentives for them to move were the same ITTL: they were textile mill jobs. On the other hand, if they weren't welcome and Manitoba was more open to Francophone settlements, the migration might have been somewhat different. Especially if the mills were already mainly hiring Dominicans or some other group. And of course, that war could leave some bad blood between French Canadians and Americans so I guess that might have made some people head back to Canada.
 
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I‘m not exactly sure what the Confederate end goal in Haiti is. Do they even have an end goal? Also the implication that Confederate text books lie about the Civil War isn’t exactly reassuring for them being a “normal” country come modern day.
 
[1] I read a study that surveyed Korean War vets and found that serving with a black person, even in a support role, significantly reduced prejudice. I think the same phenomenon happens here, at least among the enlisted men.
Yup, that's the contact hypothesis.

This is shaping up interestingly. We have a USA at approximately OTL levels of racial animosity or slightly above, a CSA that's rolled sevens a few times in a row to get... not great on race, but much less bad than it plausibly could be. Curious where you're taking this.
 
Never before have I read a TL that makes the Union even MORE racist after Confederate secession.
Have you read the unfinished Presbyterian Butcher? it's a alternate timeline of TL-191 that has the Confederacy win the great war and subsequently the U.S. falls to a Xenophobic far right government that hates Jews Blacks and Mormons and allies with Nazi Germany leaving the Confederacy and the rest of it's old allies to stop them. (Ironically the Confederates have moderated their stance on blacks and reformed somewhat since the great warn out of fear of another red black rebellion.)

Here a link to it

https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/the-presbyterian-butcher-a-history-of-the-presidency-of-gordon-mcsweeney.319250/
 
Have you read the unfinished Presbyterian Butcher? it's a alternate timeline of TL-191 that has the Confederacy win the great war and subsequently the U.S. falls to a Xenophobic far right government that hates Jews Blacks and Mormons and allies with Nazi Germany leaving the Confederacy and the rest of it's old allies to stop them. (Ironically the Confederates have moderated their stance on blacks and reformed somewhat since the great warn out of fear of another red black rebellion.)

Here a link to it

https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/the-presbyterian-butcher-a-history-of-the-presidency-of-gordon-mcsweeney.319250/
The idea of the North becoming more racist than the South is pretty interesting concept.
 
Chapter 89 - The Treaty of Paris (1897)
The Treaty of Paris (1897)
The actual Treaty of Paris was signed in January of 1897, though it was largely hammered out through December of 1896. Although the Americans and Russians were never officially allied, they threw in the towel more or less immediately after each other, and they both believed their negotiating position would be stronger if they demanded the war be settled in one conference. The Russians were remarkably unhappy with the Americans for throwing the towel in, but they got over their annoyance in pursuit of their national interests. Five powers were represented at the Paris Peace Conference, namely the Ottoman Empire, Russian Empire, United Kingdom, United States, and Qing Empire.

Despite the Russian hopes, the British peace with the Americans was relatively easy to meet. With regards to Canada, two issues emerged. First, the Americans asked for British Columbia, then-lightly populated. The Canadians were outraged, especially because the Canadians also demanded war reparations for massacred Canadian civilians in Vancouver, as well as the thousands of French-Canadians in Maine who were often cruelly expelled (returning French-Canadians often launched guerilla attacks on the American advance to Montreal, which severely sapped their supply situation). In the end, the British and Americans agreed to drop both issues, on conditions for Canadian troops being forced to withdraw from Russian Alaska. This development went over very poorly for Canada, because it seemed to many in Canada that Canadians had bled in significant numbers to fight off the Americans. Proportionally, Canada suffered more losses than any other country in World War I. However, due to the status of the United Kingdom negotiating for Canada, Canada quite clearly got nothing. The Canadians were annoyed that the Americans only paid reparations to one party - the Qing Empire, even though the total reparations were almost irrelevant because they were cancelled out by Qing reparations to the United States (for American merchants murdered by the Boxers). In practice, the US government paid the Qing government to compensate for murdered Chinese, and then the Qing government took that money to pay American merchants to compensate for murdered Americans. With that, the Americans peaced out of the conference, quickly re-establishing positive trade relations with all the nations in question. On one hand, the war might have seen pointless for America, but they had actually accomplished most of their diplomatic and political objectives. The Qing Empire both agreed to permanently accept American merchants and in a "Gentleman's Agreement", prohibit any Chinese migration to the United States. The only failure was the American attempt to annex Hawaii, which was obviously rejected because the Americans hadn't actually held onto the island during the war.

The real drama of the conference was between the United Kingdom and its allies with Imperial Russia. The United Kingdom did not view the United States as a long-term rival simply because the United States did not seem to have large expansionist impulses outside of the attempting snatching of Hawaii. Russia was seen as an imminent threat, especially with its pan-slavic rhetoric. The Russians refused to vacate Russian occupied-Armenia, claiming that the local residents would be massacred by Ottoman soldiers. After days of fierce arguing, it was eventually agreed that Russian-occupied Armenia would become an autonomous principality within the Ottoman Empire, much like Bulgaria. The Ottomans were furious, but realized that without British aid, the war would have gone much worse. Similarly as promised by the Ottomans to Italy, the Italians were given a protectorate over both Albania and Libya, though both were to remain Ottoman on paper. In exchange for accepting the creation of the Principality of Armenia, the Russians were forced to vacate all of their disputed lands with the Emir of Afghanistan. This was viewed as acceptable by the Russians, who cared much more about Armenian Christians than Central Asia expansion. The Afghans were surprised by the British at first, but this gave British India a larger buffer from Russia.

Finally, the thorniest issue was what to do in East Asia. The Qing and Russians genuinely disliked each other. The Russians had stories of Boxers brutalizing Russian captives (after the Boxer rebels ran out of Americans to attack, they were recruited to fight against the Russians, significantly bolstering Qing military strength). The Qing had stories of Russian cossacks brutally massacring Manchu villages across the Amur River. Much like in the Ottoman Empire, it was agreed that a region would be divided on the line of actual control. The pro-Qing Joseon monarch would retain all of its lands in the west of Korea, while the Russian-aligned Donghak rebels would control the East. This was actually remarkably confusing because the Donghak were not anti-monarchist, merely claiming to want to "guide" the King to a better path without his wife interfering. As a result, two Joseon Kingdoms were established, one in the west and one in the east, which quickly became known as West Joseon and East Joseon. The Russians were unwilling to give up total control of Vladivostok, a rare warm-water port, while the British were keen to limit their naval capacities. As a result, Vladivostok was declared an international city, a Russo-Qing condominium, which prohibited Russian warships. In exchange for East Korea, the Qing were transferred the one piece of the Russian Far East, the Russians cared about the least, North Sakhalin. It's unclear exactly why the Qing took North Sakhalin as a consolation prize, but it was likely that they believed the British Navy would hold it against the Russians, while they weren't so confident about any such lands north of the Amur, which they did not ask for. The Russians were also allowed to keep all of their lands captured in former Qing Xinjiang - in return, the Qing were given a right to freely settle citizens in the Amur region, although it would still remain under Russian sovereignty.

Although in many ways, British diplomats were remarkably clever during the Paris Peace Conference, hoping to forestall future issues, in many other ways, they did not solve many long-term diplomatic problems. Enmity between the Ottoman and Qing against the Russian Empire continued to fester, while the Korea situation was one that was widely seen as a future powderkeg. Imperial Russia in particular felt like a humiliated, partly defeated power. The young Tsar, Nicholas II, expected to see himself welcomed a victorious winner. Instead, he found himself facing riots in Moscow, as angry crowds pelted Imperial statues, humiliated that Russia was forced to pay reparations, gained no actual territory besides some desert cities they had never heard about, and in fact lost territory to the Qing and Afghans (as minor and unimportant as they were). His Prime Minister was forced to immediately resign, although he had to dodge several explosions by radicals. Moreover, they loathed his replacement, Sergei Witte, even more. Britain considered Russia the winner, yet Russia considered Britain the winner.
 
Wow, thanks for the update TastySpam!

A few interesting things there. The Americans wanted 54 40, I gather. I wondered if they might try for that. Losing Hawaii is going to sting much worse, I think, because the Marines fought so hard throughout the war for it. Canada's hard-fought defense is so very admirable. Even though the disputes are mostly settled, I wouldn't be surprised if both sides build a few forts on opposite sides of their border, just in case. It's the Russians that worry me....

The Russians may be upset now but it could have been worse and they and showed that they can field a decent, modern army, so that's something. The big exception is the Far East, because the situation has actually been made significantly more tense, thanks in no small part to the stubbornness of both parties and the need to end the war promptly. I'm honestly kind of sad to see Korea split. I still hope that the country will get a chance to break free of both China and Russia, but I'm not sure how bright its future is... China taking North Sakhalin was a very odd choice of territories. I guess Japan got the southern half then? Either way, this seems.... incredibly awkward and likely to make the Russians quite upset even if it wasn't very inhabitable, as it kind of screws with their domination of the sea of Okhotsk and their link to Alaska. And on top of that Korean powder keg, there's going to be a huge influx of Chinese settlers to Outer Manchuria that will definitely far outpace Russian immigration and the Qing know it. And while we're at it what if there was Korean and even Japanese migration to the free city? That could be a hell of a volatile mix. Anyway, I am concerned that either side has the necessary restraint to keep a peaceful agreement in the East.
 
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Oh, that promises ill for the future. Hopefully there'll be no trouble in North America, although I can see Canada as very keen to sort its own path after the war and the way it was treated in the peace. I can't think of many who can honestly claim to be happy after that war, except maybe France and a few others.
 
Wow, thanks for the update TastySpam!

A few interesting things there. The Americans wanted 54 40, I gather. I wondered if they might try for that. Losing Hawaii is going to sting much worse, I think, because the Marines fought so hard throughout the war for it. Canada's hard-fought defense is so very admirable. Even though the disputes are mostly settled, I wouldn't be surprised if both sides build a few forts on opposite sides of their border, just in case. It's the Russians that worry me....

The Russians may be upset now but it could have been worse and they and showed that they can field a decent, modern army, so that's something. The big exception is the Far East, because the situation has actually been made significantly more tense, thanks in no small part to the stubbornness of both parties and the need to end the war promptly. I'm honestly kind of sad to see Korea split. I still hope that the country will get a chance to break free of both China and Russia, but I'm not sure how bright its future is... China taking North Sakhalin was a very odd choice of territories. I guess Japan got the southern half then? Either way, this seems.... incredibly awkward and likely to make the Russians quite upset even if it wasn't very inhabitable, as it kind of screws with their domination of the sea of Okhotsk and their link to Alaska. And on top of that Korean powder keg, there's going to be a huge influx of Chinese settlers to Outer Manchuria that will definitely far outpace Russian immigration and the Qing know it. And while we're at it what if there was Korean and even Japanese migration to the free city? That could be a hell of a volatile mix. Anyway, I am concerned that either side has the necessary restraint to keep a peaceful agreement in the East.
Yeah, but note that the British are considerably less concerned about keeping East Asia peaceful (because it's significantly farther from British India, which is what their foreign policy is based on protecting).

Also, the real problem with the Russians is that they just didn't have rail lines going to most distant theaters. They will presumably correct that error, especially as the country continues its rapid industrialization.

Is Pyotr Stolypin still around in Russia?
Yeah, he should be kicking around. If anything, probably has some high position like Minister of Finance or something.
 
OK, here's the map as I understand it.

world map.jpg


There are a few areas I'm unsure about: Central Asia, Indochina, and the German colonies in general come to mind. I welcome suggestions.
 
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OK, here's the map as I understand it.

View attachment 518105

There are a few areas I'm unsure about: Central Asia, Indochina, and the German colonies in general come to mind. I welcome suggestions.
Nice map, but how are the Belgians still holding Katanga? Its landlocked, do they need to go through the German Congo every time? Realistically, they would have sold it a long time ago by now.
Also, is Cuba independent here or is it a quasi spanish dominion?
 
Nice map, but how are the Belgians still holding Katanga? Its landlocked, do they need to go through the German Congo every time? Realistically, they would have sold it a long time ago by now.
Also, is Cuba independent here or is it a quasi spanish dominion?
Good eye for Katanga. As it so happens, it was stated earlier that they got to keep it as a sort of consolation prize. My guess is that the only reason they haven't sold it is that Leopold is so angry about losing his empire that this is a matter of pride now. And yes, they would have to go through Germany territory and since it's remote anyway, the whole colony is likely pretty wild.

And yes, I had forgotten about Cuba's status as a nominal sort of Spanish Commonwealth.l, though it is functionally fully independent. I suppose I could shade it light olive. That reminds me, I forgot Savannah leased territory and Vladivostok's weird status.
 
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Nice map, but how are the Belgians still holding Katanga? Its landlocked, do they need to go through the German Congo every time? Realistically, they would have sold it a long time ago by now.
Also, is Cuba independent here or is it a quasi spanish dominion?
Katanga is basically a rather strange obsession of the new Belgian King, so even though it makes Belgium no money whatsoever and has the most strategically awful location ever, he's keeping it lol.

Good eye for Katanga. As it so happens, it was stated earlier that they got to keep it as a sort of consolation prize. My guess is that the only reason they haven't sold it is that Leopold is so angry about losing his empire that this is a matter of pride now. And yes, they would have to go through Germany territory and since it's remote anyway, the whole colony is likely pretty wild.

And yes, I had forgotten about Cuba's status as a nominal sort of Spanish Commonwealth.l, though it is functionally fully independent. I suppose I could shade it light olive. That reminds me, I forgot Savannah leased territory and Vladivostok's weird status.
Thnaks so much for the map! Looks awesome! Yeah, the only thing that seems off is Cuba and the fact that the Mexicans snatched a small strip of land from Texas. I also think Somalia is entirely British, Eritrea French, and Kenya North German, though I'd have to check. That seems to be it! Awesome work, as usual!
 
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