Divided We Stand

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by wolfram, Aug 29, 2017.

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  1. wolfram Livin' The Houston Motto Donor

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    Houston, Texas
    The Parti Cadien came out of a unionist party, largely because Long's base was Anglophone anti-Catholics. That doesn't mean that it'll stay unionist.
     
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  2. Bulldoggus The Mad Keynesian of AH.com

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    Massachusetts, New England Republic
    Wow, this is minty phresh. Will New England be a regionalist area or a Unionist hotbed?
     
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  3. Threadmarks: 5: Hadn't been for Cotton Ed Smith/I'd been votin' long before this...

    wolfram Livin' The Houston Motto Donor

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    South Carolina's Cotton Ed Smith was a Palmetto State institution by 1938. A so-called "conscientious objector to the 20th century", Smith was known for his virulent racism and his relentless defense of the textile interests. While at first he had supported the Roosevelt administration, he opposed it as it became clear that the Roosevelt administration was open to both civil rights and the diversification of the Southern economy. In 1936, he walked out of the DNC when a black minister delivered the invocation. Two years later, he filibustered a minimum wage bill for hours.

    He was opposed in the Senate primary by Governor Olin Johnston. Johnston was well-known as an advocate for white workers' rights, as well as a proponent of rural electrification. He shepherded social security and unemployment compensation bills through the State House, used the National Guard to protect striking workers, and, unusually for Southern governors, stayed more-or-less silent on segregation.

    Going into the Democratic primary, the race was considered a likely Johnston victory. Smith was relatively unpopular in South Carolina, while Johnston's support for the New Deal was still popular. However, Smith had a few advantages. Johnston may have had the support of the mill workers, but Smith had worked for the mill owners for three decades. And Smith was better able to outflank Johnston on race.

    Still, it's not hard to imagine a world where the primary went the other way. Where Johnston - if not him, some other Rooseveltian Palmetto Stater - ran as an independent against a Democratic Smith. Where South Carolina had a left-populist party not unlike Agrarian Justice, and, likely, where the rest of the South followed suit.

    But it was not to be.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Pug Biaggi/Traficant 2020

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    Oct 14, 2016
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    DINO Land, USA
    *sees new update*
    *starts dancing*
     
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  5. Gonzo [Insert witty statement]

    So I just discovered this, and I have to say that I am enjoying this TL a lot. Please do continue. :)
     
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  6. Threadmarks: 6: 1940, Part 1

    wolfram Livin' The Houston Motto Donor

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    Going into the 1940 election, Franklin D. Roosevelt was a prohibitive favorite to win re-election. The polls still often showed "Generic Republican" in first place, but after 1936 it was generally agreed that polling would need another few elections before it could be trusted. Despite the Agricultural Normalization Act, despite the Second Depression of 1935, despite everything, Roosevelt still had enough support in enough states to essentially guarantee he would remain in power. Almost all Democrats, many members of Longite parties, and a great deal of Republicans planned to vote for him.

    There were still avenues of attack. The president was generally perceived as far more hawkish than his country, with everyone from Agrarian Justice to Arthur Vandenburg condemning the President for perceived aggressiveness. This attack was made more salient when the boarding of a merchant marine ship by German sailors almost led to war in early 1939. The left-isolationists of the Farm Belt and the right-isolationists of Washington high society by way of Harvard and Princeton found common cause against ivory-tower interventionists, at least, for a time.

    But not all Republicans were isolationists. With a fracturing Republican Party and a strong position at home, Roosevelt decided to take a gamble.

    [​IMG]

    Selecting Henry Stimson, a conservative Republican, did not itself create the National Union Party, as the historical memory seems to recall it. But it, and a few backroom deals, did create the "Roosevelt Republican" splinter faction, which duly endorsed the President. Charles McNary, the former Senate Minority Leader ousted by Robert Taft for his relative liberalism, also supported the President. In short, trying to pull in Republican moderates to replace Farm Belt liberals was working.

    Going into the Republican National Convention - delayed by two months due to the simmering conflict between "Ultra" conservatives and "Rosy" moderates - the leading candidates were Senate Majority Leader Robert Taft and Governor Thomas Dewey, with Senator Arthur Vandenburg as a possible compromise candidate.
     
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  7. Techdread Loyal Oppositionist

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    City of Edinburgh
    So, FDR is turning away from the liberals & progressives (In the vein of Henry Wallace, etc. I mean) and seeking support from more moderate voters with this move?
     
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  8. Israel Well-Known Member

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    Mar 12, 2016
    Didn't expect Stimson
     
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  9. Sithlent Professional Wikipedia Reader

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    The Land of Pop Taxes and Corrupt Governors
    @wolfram How goes the rest of the world? Is it the same as OTL or would it be possible for some of us to possibly contribute to DWS's story? :p
     
  10. wolfram Livin' The Houston Motto Donor

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    Dec 5, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Yes. The rise of "Longite" parties has put a dent in his coalition - this helps plug it.

    It would be possible! PM me first, though.
    Also, the next update deals with foreign affairs, so you may want to wait until that.
     
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  11. Techdread Loyal Oppositionist

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    Jun 22, 2010
    Location:
    City of Edinburgh
    Oh. :pensive:
     
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