Defending Manila in ‘41?

Which they didn't have enough of. If the PI weren't run by crooks, they could have bought Bannerman's entire surplus of 30-40 Krags and Colt Potato Diggerto at least give every soldier a rifle, and MGs, at a cheap price.
That would beat the 12 Guage Zip guns they ended up with.
PI isnt run by corrupt people in that time as the corruption problem mainly started after the liberation or 45/46, the problem here is there is the budget is not enough, and they only increased their budget in defense to 15M Pesos ($1= P2 is the convertion rate in that time) a few months before the war in July 1941.
 
PI isnt run by corrupt people in that time as the corruption problem mainly started after the liberation or 45/46, the problem here is there is the budget is not enough, and they only increased their budget in defense to 15M Pesos ($1= P2 is the convertion rate in that time) a few months before the war in July 1941.
Both. Dugout Doug had a lot of pay(and other Deals) for what he was doing there before the war

And this, from the Washington Post, many years ago
on Jan. 3, 1942, Quezon directed by executive order that $640,000 from the Philippine treasury be conveyed to the personal bank accounts of MacArthur and three members of his staff "in recognition of outstanding service to the Commonwealth of the Philippines."

Quezon said that the "recompense and reward" was for "distinguished service" from Nov. 15, 1935, to Dec. 30, 1941.

The transactions, made by radio grams from Corregidor to the Chase National Bank of the City of New York, placed $500,000 in MacArthur's account according to the records. Major Gen. Richard K. Sutherland, MacArthur's chief of staff, received $75,000; Brig. Gen. Richard J. Marshall Jr., the deputy chief of staff, received $45,000 and Lt. Col. Sidney L. Huff, MacArthur's personal aide, recieved $20,000.
 
Disperse the fighters, move the bombers to the south, along with enough fighters to defend the air fields, to where the heavies can conduct strikes to the north while being beyond easy reach of enemy aircraft. Send most of the Scouts from Luzon to the other Islands to get resistance cells started and make the Japanese bleed.
So the best part the U.S. and the Philippine Commnwealth could do was to really abandon Manila. I do recall Quezon relocated the capital several times to Dumaguete, Bukidnon, and Oroquieta. Those P-40s and B-17s would need to be relocated to Mindanao since the Japanese only controlled the coastal cities.
As this early Vietnam-style of conflict occurs, the USAFFE could be supported by USN submarines operating deep behind enemy lines.
 
The US Army was mostly M1903s in 1941 and they were used all the way to 1945 as standard issue for some units. They were used as sniper rifles as late as Vietnam. There simply weren't enough Garands around. That the Filipinos got any is somewhat surprising. As I said the US Army was short on Garands.
Oh yeah, I kinda forgot that Garands were limited in the late 30s and early 40s.

It was only at the end of the war that there were 2-3 million Garands so the U.S. supplied or sold them to post-war allies such as the South Korea, Japan, Israel, South Vietnam, and Turkey to name a few.

The Garand continued to be used by the Armed Forces of the Philippines well into the 1950s, seeing action in Korea and the Huk Rebellion. It was only in the late 50s that the AFP changed to the M14 and in 1966 when the M16 became the standard-issue rifle.

Speaking of the Vietnam War, I did read books and watch documentaries that especially in the early years of it, both sides still used WWII surplus ranging from the Garand, M1 Carbine, Springfield, Enfield, STEN, Thompson, and the Grease Gun. Even the Viet Minh and the Viet Cong used leftover French, Soviet-supplied German weapons, and left-over Japanese weapons such as the Arisaka and the Type 92 machine gun.


 
As this early Vietnam-style of conflict occurs, the USAFFE could be supported by USN submarines operating deep behind enemy lines.
Not unless the USAFFE is willing to become a guerilla force (much like the guerilleros IOTL). A submarine might be able to carry 30 tonnes or so of supplies, but that won't go far for formed infantry units conducting regular operations. If you're going to add artillery as well, it gets even worse. There also aren't all that many submarines, and every one of them carrying supplies isn't looking for Japanese shipping. Given the torpedo situation, that might not be such a problem, all things considered, but the USN is still likely to be reluctant to divert their boats for this. It was hard enough to get them to run supplies to the guerillas IOTL!
 
Both. Dugout Doug had a lot of pay(and other Deals) for what he was doing there before the war

And this, from the Washington Post, many years ago
on Jan. 3, 1942, Quezon directed by executive order that $640,000 from the Philippine treasury be conveyed to the personal bank accounts of MacArthur and three members of his staff "in recognition of outstanding service to the Commonwealth of the Philippines."

Quezon said that the "recompense and reward" was for "distinguished service" from Nov. 15, 1935, to Dec. 30, 1941.

The transactions, made by radio grams from Corregidor to the Chase National Bank of the City of New York, placed $500,000 in MacArthur's account according to the records. Major Gen. Richard K. Sutherland, MacArthur's chief of staff, received $75,000; Brig. Gen. Richard J. Marshall Jr., the deputy chief of staff, received $45,000 and Lt. Col. Sidney L. Huff, MacArthur's personal aide, recieved $20,000.
Well that is the little corruption unlike the $80B surplus scandal in the next administration after the war. That is when corruption overload started
 
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Not unless the USAFFE is willing to become a guerilla force (much like the guerilleros IOTL). A submarine might be able to carry 30 tonnes or so of supplies, but that won't go far for formed infantry units conducting regular operations. If you're going to add artillery as well, it gets even worse. There also aren't all that many submarines, and every one of them carrying supplies isn't looking for Japanese shipping. Given the torpedo situation, that might not be such a problem, all things considered, but the USN is still likely to be reluctant to divert their boats for this. It was hard enough to get them to run supplies to the guerillas IOTL!
Since torpedoes of the U.S. Navy were crap at this period. It would only be until 1943 when this problem was fixed.
What I did read though is that submarines carrying Marine Raiders and OSS personnel were deployed to the Philippines as early as 1942 all the way up to the start of the liberation in 1944. These pre-Special Forces and OSS often made contact with Filipino resistance fighters and remnant American forces which gave them intel on the positions and movements of Japanese troops. Also, it was here when the M1 Carbines were supplied to the resistance.
 
Both. Dugout Doug had a lot of pay(and other Deals) for what he was doing there before the war

And this, from the Washington Post, many years ago
on Jan. 3, 1942, Quezon directed by executive order that $640,000 from the Philippine treasury be conveyed to the personal bank accounts of MacArthur and three members of his staff "in recognition of outstanding service to the Commonwealth of the Philippines."

Quezon said that the "recompense and reward" was for "distinguished service" from Nov. 15, 1935, to Dec. 30, 1941.

The transactions, made by radio grams from Corregidor to the Chase National Bank of the City of New York, placed $500,000 in MacArthur's account according to the records. Major Gen. Richard K. Sutherland, MacArthur's chief of staff, received $75,000; Brig. Gen. Richard J. Marshall Jr., the deputy chief of staff, received $45,000 and Lt. Col. Sidney L. Huff, MacArthur's personal aide, recieved $20,000.
This is why Mister Corncob Pipe is considered to be "unacceptable" in performance. Morality in command is almost as important as "technical competence". It goes directly to his judgment and objectivity.

A man who accepts bribes cannot be considered able to be competent.


About aircraft and guerrilla warfare.

So the best part the U.S. and the Philippine Commnwealth could do was to really abandon Manila. I do recall Quezon relocated the capital several times to Dumaguete, Bukidnon, and Oroquieta. Those P-40s and B-17s would need to be relocated to Mindanao since the Japanese only controlled the coastal cities.
As this early Vietnam-style of conflict occurs, the USAFFE could be supported by USN submarines operating deep behind enemy lines.

a. runways.
b. spare parts.
c. trained mechanics.
d. integrated air defense system.

Air warfare is MAHAN, not Clauswitz. The use of the medium (ability to fly in the airspace) is at issue. Air forces cannot run away and hide. They fight or they die on the ground. Plus, there is the idiot, Brereton.
 
On December 26th 1941, General Douglas MacArthur hoping to spare the city and its inhabitants, declared the Philippines capital an open city, withdrawing his forces to Bataan?

Could MacArthur have ordered his troops to dig in and defend the city, using its urban sprawl as a man made fortress as Stalingrad had almost a year later? Or was the American and Filipino army simply too disorganized and under-armed in those hectic opening weeks of war to successfully stage such an action, would this hold the Japanese off any longer then the defense at Bataan had, or would MacArthur join Paulus in the annals of history as leading his army into a rat trap?

The forces there are under-equipped and it will be surely Nanking 2.0 with lots of massacres after they conquer Manila. The Philippines under Japanese Occupation will be much brutal than OTL.
 
Since torpedoes of the U.S. Navy were crap at this period. It would only be until 1943 when this problem was fixed.
What I did read though is that submarines carrying Marine Raiders and OSS personnel were deployed to the Philippines as early as 1942 all the way up to the start of the liberation in 1944. These pre-Special Forces and OSS often made contact with Filipino resistance fighters and remnant American forces which gave them intel on the positions and movements of Japanese troops. Also, it was here when the M1 Carbines were supplied to the resistance.
In terms of torpedoes didn't the older version as used by the Asiatic(?) Fleet actually work as they were supposed to i.e. they went 'bang' when they hit something & it was only the more modern ones which had problems.
 
In terms of torpedoes didn't the older version as used by the Asiatic(?) Fleet actually work as they were supposed to i.e. they went 'bang' when they hit something & it was only the more modern ones which had problems.
The Mark Xs ran deep and missed.
 
In terms of torpedoes didn't the older version as used by the Asiatic(?) Fleet actually work as they were supposed to i.e. they went 'bang' when they hit something & it was only the more modern ones which had problems.
Most ended up as duds.
 
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