Death of a Republic (A monarchical USA timeline)

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Schnozzberry, Jan 26, 2017.

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How is the timeline so far?

  1. It's good

    172 vote(s)
    65.6%
  2. It's ok

    58 vote(s)
    22.1%
  3. It's bad

    2 vote(s)
    0.8%
  4. It's really bad

    2 vote(s)
    0.8%
  5. It's gone to the Alien Space Bats

    28 vote(s)
    10.7%
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  1. Herr Frage Jesus Christ Is In Heaven

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    A monarchy is being proposed? My my, they really have been shaken up.

    A lot will hinge on Washington of course, when he crushes the Regulator Rebellion he will yet again be a hero and his words could mke or break in the public eye and many elites eyes on these plans. We know he does not remain as dictator.
     
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  2. Knightmare Well-Known Member

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    Of course, at the same time, Stalin was "only" the Party Secretary.

    So it could just mean he gets a new title. In any event, the Regulators have kinda killed off any chance of small government for some time, I think.
     
  3. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Ho ho ho, I've got something more nefarious than just fragmenting the USA.


    It's actually not that far off from what was proposed in real life. Hamilton and Gorham actually proposed governments with a monarch or a monarchesque leader in OTL. I'm just giving their real ideas a nudge into the limelight.


    I will confirm that Washington won't be Dictator when his tenure is over. What happens to him after that, will be revealed soon, but I will say this. At this point in American history, Washington was probably the only person who could become an absolute leader. In 1782, it was actually proposed in the Newburgh Letter that Washington become king. But, whether he will come to power or not, will be revealed soonish.
     
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  4. Knightmare Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, I can kinda see him taking power, if only to make sure that the US gets on a right course, and after the Regulators, someone who is skilled is needed.

    Not for long though.
     
  5. Threadmarks: The Horn of Fate

    Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Hi everybody. I know what some of you might be thinking, "Why is this so short? You've had five days to work on it!" Well, I've actually been writing a lot, but the events of the next update will be a bit of a doozy, so I decided to do a bit of a mini-update to set the stage. Also, I've decided to start titling the posts of this timeline, starting with this one.


    "Let me not then die ingloriously and without a struggle, but let me first do some great thing that shall be told among men hereafter."
    —Hector of Troy

    In New Hampshire, the Regulators were locked in a far more prolonged war than first expected. After Derryfield had fallen, the Regulators were able to rush north and take Concord on April 20th. Nathaniel Peabody was appointed the Chief Executive of the “Regulated Republic of New Hampshire” the following day. In theory, Peabody was to keep New Hampshire stable while the Massachusettsan army marched to subjugate Maine. However Peabody’s government was unpopular from its very beginnings. The Massachusettsan army left Concord early April 24th, and three days later, local militias rose up throughout the regions around Concord. On April 29th, Peabody fled Concord.

    To say the least, Martin Horn was displeased with Peabody. When Peabody reached the Regulator army on May 2nd, the Regulators were just departing from Dover, prepared to march into Maine. Upon hearing the news from Peabody, Horn reversed the army’s direction. However, the weather proved to not be on his side. A thunderstorm blew through Dover and bogged down the Regulators. On May 6th, the army once again was marching towards Concord when a rider brought news from Massachusetts to Horn. News of Washington’s dictatorship had reached Clark Hopswood two days prior and Hopswood sent the order to recall Horn and his men, so as to prepare the defense against Washington. With reluctance, Horn turned his army around once more, and began to march to Boston. Nathaniel Peabody and his soldiers departed for Derryfield, which remained under Regulator control.

    However, as Horn’s army marched back to Boston, Horn was repeatedly frustrated by resistance in New Hampshire. Peabody’s retreat had inspired revolt against the Regulators across the state, and the Regulator army was forced to blaze a path back towards Boston. New Hampshirite militias would harass the Regulator army to such a point that it would be forced to halt, sometimes for days in a row. However, after twenty days of a grueling forty mile march out of New Hampshire, the Regulator Army was safe in the city of Newburyport, where Horn allowed a day of rest. In all, of the seven thousand Regulators who marched across the border two months prior, only forty-three hundred survived.

    News from Boston ultimately proved to be the most infuriating thing to Horn. A veteran of the American Revolution, Horn had supported the Regulators in order to provide for his fellow veterans, and as Executive, Horn had toured Massachusetts to bring help to veterans who needed assistance. Horn had disagreed with much of what Hopswood believed, and the New Hampshire campaign had sowed doubts in Horn’s mind about Hopswood’s capacity to lead. What cemented those beliefs was news of The Regulator Manifesto, and the news of the lynchings of Price, FitzHerbert and Hammond. Horn resolved to do something to stop it, and after a long night of conferring with his aides, Horn had a plan. Clark Hopswood must go.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
  6. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Morning everybody. I fell down the stairs and conked my back, so instead of sleeping, I've been laying on ice packs and writing. Although the full update isn't done, I figured that some might like a couple of faux-Wikipedia infoboxes on the two Regulator Executives that died, Edward Price and Taylor Hammond.

    EdwardPrice.PNG TaylorHammond.PNG
     
  7. Threadmarks: Martin Horn is Touched by God's Middle Finger

    Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Hi everybody. Ready for a doozy? I think I delivered a chapter that is quite shocking, and I hope y'all enjoy it. I would love to hear some feedback on how it is going so far, but enough chit-chat, here's the next chapter.

    “Struck by lightning!”

    —J.R.R. Tolkien

    The night had grown long as Martin Horn’s army approached Boston on the 28th. Boston was quiet, and the Regulators were able to take the city quietly. The few soldiers still in the city simply surrendered, rather than fight. Job Shattuck was captured in his sleep, completely unaware of Horn’s plot.

    However, Clark Hopswood was missing. And alongside the missing Hopswood was a large sum of money. Unbeknownst to Horn, Hopswood had been tipped off by a loyal messenger from Horn’s army, and had fled the city earlier that day. By the time Horn’s army arrived, Hopswood was on a ship bound for some unknown port. While Hopswood didn’t keep a journal, some of his future writings would indicate that he hadn’t initially considered his flight the end of his “revolution.” Despite this, Hopswood would never set foot on American soil again.

    Horn was both furious, and somewhat relieved. Although he wanted Hopswood taken care of permanently, Hopswood was still a popular figure in Boston. His flight not only tarnished his reputation, but gave some legitimacy to Horn’s seizure of power. After all, Hopswood had stolen a large sum of money when he fled. Unfortunately for Job Shattuck, he was accused of being in cahoots with Hopswood. While it is unlikely that he knew Hopswood was going to flee, Shattuck was executed as a traitor on May 29th by blowing from a gun. With the death of Shattuck, Horn was the only Executive of Massachusetts remaining.

    However, Horn’s rule wouldn’t be without problems. On June 2nd, news of Washington’s army seizing Great Barrington led Horn to rally the Regulator army for “one last battle.” As the Regulators set out, an electric air hung through Boston. Horn had shaken things up, and only a solid victory could keep the Regulator movement together. If he lost, the Regulators were lost. This didn’t demoralize Horn’s army, however. In fact, the Regulator army made record time marching to Springfield, the birthplace of the movement. Four days later, on June 6th, the Regulator army had arrived in Springfield. Three hours after they arrived, Washington’s army arrived.

    The first skirmish between the two armies went well for the Regulators. But Washington’s army regrouped and an hour later, the Regulators retreated just outside of the town. Just as Washington’s army began to push the Regulators even farther back, it began to rain. A storm whipped up, and a biblical torrent of rain began to push down upon the armies as electricity blazed in the sky. Washington called off the offensive, as the weather proved too bad to keep the battle going. Horn, however, refused to stop. Calling for his, Horn, sword raised aloft, shouted to his men: “Today, the Almighty has delivered for us our enemies! Men, today, we will have our freedom!” Suddenly, a terrific beam of light lanced out, and a terrible sound shook the night. Martin Horn collapsed, scorched by a bolt of lightning that had struck his sword. The Regulator army collapsed, dispersing into the storm. Many saw Horn’s death as an act of God, smiting him down for his arrogance.

    In Boston, the news of Horns death led to protests against the few Regulators still in Boston. Eventually, on June 9th, a group of Bostonians stormed the prison, freeing everyone who had been arrested by the Regulators. One such person was Daniel Shays who had been imprisoned since losing the Battle of Boston. Upon freeing Shays, the crowd convinced him to lead in the taking down of the remains of the Regulator government in Boston. And with a crowd of eighty Bostonians, Daniel Shays marched down to the State House and had the remainder of the Free Regulated Republic of Massachusetts’ government arrested. This small protest became known as Shays’ Rebellion, and June 9th would be remembered in Bostonian history, eventually becoming known as Union Day, and an official holiday in 1847.

    The Washington army would arrive in Boston on June 13th and was welcomed by the Bostonians. Shays surrendered to Washington. Immediately after, Washington pardoned Shays. While some towns might hold out against the Union’s regained control, the Regulators were defeated. Peace had come to Massachusetts, albeit with a cost. In the nine month conflict, ten thousand Massachusettsans, approximately 3% of the state's population, had died.

    In New Hampshire the final collapse of the Massachusettsan Regulators led to Peabody’s government losing the remainder of its support. On June 17th, a riot forced Peabody to flee Derryfield. Peabody fled south towards the border between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, hoping to join up with any remaining Regulators. However, only three hours into his flight, a New Hampshire militia managed to capture Peabody. He was taken by the militia to the ruins of Exeter, where he was hung in front of the tavern that had been the center of John Sullivan’s stand months prior.

    Finally, the Regulator Revolt was over. Despite the ongoing slave revolt in the south, celebrations were held across the Union. The effects of the Regulators had been held throughout the Union. In the south, the Regulator’s principles were dangerous, having been a contributing factor to the slave revolt that still wracked the Carolinas. In large states, such as Pennsylvania or New York, the revolt had been a source of unease for the more successful citizens. While the Regulators’ beliefs never quite caught on in these states, their large populations would not have been capable of being realistically suppressed had they found common ground with the Regulators.

    It was in New England, however, that the Regulators influenced the most. While the Regulators’ beliefs had been somewhat popular in the initial period of the revolt, following the Massachusettsan invasion of New Hampshire, and the Battle of Exeter, all such feelings vanished. As the revolt continued to drag on, many in New England began to push for a government that would protect them. One, rather controversial statement published in the Connecticut Courant argued that Washington should a Caesar, not a Cincinnatus and take up the mantle of Dictator in Perpetuum. While the author of the piece was largely ridiculed, he was correct in one manner. In the murky days following the Regulators’ defeat, the fate of the Union rested on the shoulders of Washington. His actions in the remaining months would make the Union, or they would shatter it forever.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
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  8. Herr Frage Jesus Christ Is In Heaven

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    "Martin Horn, remembered as a man touched by the middle finger of God."

    So, Shay survives. And while Peabody is fled and Hopswood fled, Washington has a number of prisoners to try.
     
  9. Knightmare Well-Known Member

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    On the upside, this counts as treason, so no chance of a overly narrow definition this time!
     
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  10. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    That's perfect. Herr Frage, you are amazing with words.

    Peabody actually got hung in the ruins of Exeter. And the prisoners will have an interesting trial. After all, it might be hard for them to find a John Adams to defend them.

    Yep, down with an overly narrow definition. Up with an overly broad one!
     
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  11. Knightmare Well-Known Member

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    The fact they got a trial, and not a summary lynching is a miracle in and of itself.
     
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  12. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    The only people of the FRRM (aside from Hopswood) who survived were in the relatively powerless legislature, and that coupled with Shays arresting them was enough to spare them. But, when Governor Bowdoin gets back in charge, he may not be very merciful.
     
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  13. Herr Frage Jesus Christ Is In Heaven

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    Yeah they may be nobodies, but after all the chaos the government will have a desire to assert power through the legal channels. What happens with them will depend on how the Governor wants to move on, reconciliation or grinding the last few pieces under heel.

    I am guessing a bounty will go out on Hopswood.

    But the bigger question is Washington. Once more the man of the hour, what he does or doesn't do will mean more to the people than the decrees coming out of the Convention.
     
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  14. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Bowdoin's choices will be very critical here. If he makes the people angry with too harsh a punishment, he risks destroying the peace that is currently present. But, he also can't be too lenient either, or else risk appearing weak.

    Oh certainly. But, who will collect it, now that is the thousand pound question.

    Before his dictatorship, Washington was so popular, he could have overthrown the American government if he chose to do so. Now, he might be so popular that the people might not accept a government without him in it. It will certainly cause some problems in the future.
     
  15. Herr Frage Jesus Christ Is In Heaven

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    "Pity poor George my friends. It is a rare temptation that a man that can refuse a crown having done more than most to earn one. Yet he did so. And now the Almighty has seen fit to raise him to such heights that should he stride into a wedding and declare prima nocta all would not only abide but bless the bride in hope of bearing his illegimate progeny. What man may keep his clear thrust to such dizzying heights, beyond even a Roman Triumph?

    "And in his hands and will, rest the fate of this nation's future; and the destruction or salvation of all our past struggles as well."
     
  16. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    Think you have his dates wrong...

    Um....1787 - 1723 is 64, not 54.....
     
  17. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    GAH! This is what I get for not double checking. Thanks for that, I'll make sure to get it right next time.
     
  18. The_Shortline_Gamer_KSP Railfanning on the Moon

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    So has Maine been re-annexed into the United States? I need to know this for the map.
     
  19. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    The Republic of Maine still exists, but it's kind of in the same manner as the Vermont Republic, so it should be included as part of the USA. Thanks for doing the maps though, they are amazing.
     
  20. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Hey everybody, I noticed that this timeline has gotten up to 100 posts, and 5K views! I don't know how much of an accomplishment that is, but I choose to believe it's pretty good. Anywho, in response to this, I've decided to do something I haven't done before, and post some Wikipedia infoboxes, one for the FRRM, and one for Martin Horn.

    EDIT: Found out about polls. I've made one, to get a read on perception of this timeline.

    Regulator Massachusetts Wikipedia Box.PNG MartinHorn.PNG
     

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