Death of a Republic (A monarchical USA timeline)

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Schnozzberry, Jan 26, 2017.

?

How is the timeline so far?

  1. It's good

    172 vote(s)
    65.6%
  2. It's ok

    58 vote(s)
    22.1%
  3. It's bad

    2 vote(s)
    0.8%
  4. It's really bad

    2 vote(s)
    0.8%
  5. It's gone to the Alien Space Bats

    28 vote(s)
    10.7%
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  1. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Somewhat, although the titles wouldn't rotate as the states choose their titles.

    I didn't think about the state nickname (that's the term, right?). Definitely going to keep that in mind for the next ones.


    That's pretty cool, and you did a good job!
     
  2. last admiral Nusantara Confederate Alliance founder, Monarchist

    Joined:
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    Republic of...(Victoria)
    1. Retroculture! We dont need those fancy-smachy tech, 1930s and below only!
    2. Dictator Rumford, self-insert of William S. Lind, have turn people of the Maine into "Mainiac" redneck.
    3. They are oh soo awesome-i want to shit my power-pant Christian Marine as core unit, Jaeger-like light infantry militia to protect Murica from this, Cultural Marxist. And they were trained with 4th generation warfare doctrine crap.

    Click this if you dont like your sanity: https://forums.spacebattles.com/thr...a-novel-of-fourth-generation-what-the.360750/
     
  3. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    At first when I saw this, I thought: "Oh no, last admiral had a mental breakdown or something."

    Then I read the link. I've made jokes about cursed timelines before, but that's right and truly cursed. I might have a reference of that now that I'm aware of it, but it's pretty weird.
     
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  4. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    This sums up my reaction to both your post and that link:

     
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  5. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    We all know Stephen King would be President for Life of Maine, with his imprisoned opponents forced to watch an never ending marathon of the worse movies based off his books. :p

    (Sorry, I couldn’t help myself.)
     
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  6. last admiral Nusantara Confederate Alliance founder, Monarchist

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    Well, a tad bit. College, University and schoolarships online hunting do that to any healthy mind.:'(:'(:'(
    Who? Do you mean Lind?
     
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  7. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    Who’s Lind?
     
  8. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Yes. After reading his Wikipedia page, I have an idea for his role as a minor political figure.


    This guy. He's an OTL American monarchist, specifically interested in Prussian and the House of Hohenzollern. Weird figure, perfect fit for the 1980s-1990s USA ITTL.
     
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  9. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    Huh, yep I guest he’d be it.
     
  10. last admiral Nusantara Confederate Alliance founder, Monarchist

    Joined:
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    Please continue reading the link i have send. Even the Old Fred he "worship" soo much in Victoria would rise back from the grave and force choke both him and Bill Kraft. Thats very much how he fucked up US under the name of 'Retroculture'.

    I'm a monarchist, and he dont even do anything that related to "monarchy" ideal in Victoria. And i would enjoy leading a real monarchist milita against him instead.
    I would press "Exterminatus" button on his abomination, Northe Confederacy/Victoria. it disgracefull ranting of an old man. Just read my previous link and finished it.
     
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  11. Threadmarks: The States Attempt to take the Purple

    Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Hello everyone! Sorry for the extremely slow wait this time, I've had a lot of writers block at the moment, and all of my classes are heavy-writing focused so I haven't had much time to write either. Through this semester, updates are likely to be a bit slower. However, since there's a limit on the number of images/post, I'll space them out a bit to fill the interval.

    “I’ve always found that those most insistent on their titles ... are those least deserving of them.”
    --Brian Staveley

    With every day that the Ohio War stayed contained in the west, the more each state began to focus on domestic issues. And with the increasing focus on domestic issues, the monarchist states began to transition from their republican titles to using monarchist titles with most states taking Berkeley’s lead and becoming duchies with regents joining or replacing governors. Throughout 1791 and 1792, this was a simple affair occurring in the background of the Ohio War.

    However, in the Old Dominion, the question of what the state should be changed to turned into a bitter political battle between Virginia’s Federalist, Confederationalist and Republican factions. Virginia was the largest state in the Union and home to over 20% of the Union’s population, so Virginia’s actions would have large ramifications on the future of the United States and the American Monarchy. Virginia’s Federalists believed that Virginia was to be the dominant state in the Union and as such should have a title higher than the Duchy or Margravate titles other monarchist states had adopted. The Confederationalists were divided between monarchist and republican camps, with the monarchist camp promoting a simple Duchy in order to avoid antagonizing the other states, while the republican camp wished to retain Virginia’s title as a Commonwealth. Unsurprisingly, the Republicans wanted Virginia to remain a Commonwealth in the hopes that the first step in rolling back the monarchy would be made in Virginia, while a few radical Republicans advocated for Virginia becoming a full Republic.

    While Virginia’s title debate remained deadlocked through 1791 and 1792, a new election to the House of Burgesses and a considerable amount of political maneuvering allowed the Federalists to successfully push through a title change, thus on March 16th, 1793, the Commonwealth of Virginia was no more and the Grand Duchy of Virginia was born. As news spread, debates over whether or not Virginia could even adopt such a title, yet alone whether it would put Virginia ahead of other states erupted. Further complicating the issue was the fact that the official title of the monarch of the United States had yet to be officially decided. Most often referred to as “Prince,” the official title as per the constitution was simply “Monarch” as the monarchist clause in the constitution was undeveloped due to it never having been expected to be adopted. As such, nobody knew the actual “rank” that monarch Gilbert held, and therefore some accused Virginia of attempting to place itself above the Federal government, as well as the other states.

    The first state to react was South Carolina which on July 4th renamed itself from the Duchy of South Carolina to the Grand Duchy of South Carolina, prompting further uproar across the United States and anger from the Virginian government. Regent of Virginia (and one of 2 major candidates for Grand Duke), Henry Lee III, denounced South Carolina’s self-promotion, accusing the South Carolinians of forgetting Virginia’s aid in the New African slave revolt.

    Massachusetts changed its title on July 18th, adopting the title of Electoric-Duchy, a title created to show how the Duke was an Elected monarch. Still a relatively humble title, especially in comparison to those to come, Massachusetts’ title inadvertently stoked the flames as it was frequently misreported that Massachusetts declared itself an Electorate, a title with higher prestige than Duchy.

    Up to this point, the rising squabbles over titles had remained relatively isolated to the monarchist states, with republicans broadly scorning or mocking the goings on. However, on July 22nd, both Connecticut and New York changed their titles. Connecticut declared itself a Serene Republic, while New York, despite being a monarchist state, became the Regent-Republic. Inspired by the Venetian Republic, Connecticut chose the term Serene Republic as a tribute to the state’s mercantile nature (“we always seek Serene waters” as Governor Huntington noted), while Regent-Republic was chosen by New York as the state adopted a permanent regency due to harsh tensions with the large Republican faction. Connecticut’s “lofty” title and New York’s “abuse of the term Republic” provoked outrage amongst Republicans as well.

    North Carolina would declare itself a Grand Duchy on August 1st, but that was overshadowed by the declaration of the Free Duchy of Pennsylvania on August 3rd. Pennsylvania had been a republican state that stuck with the Union when the republican revolt occurred, and subsequently Pennsylvania’s politics were subsequently heavily divided. The Confederationalists (having organized into the state-level Reform Party) maintained plurality in the legislature, and held the Governorship. This meant that the Reform Party had to sway to either the Federalists or Republicans to maintain control. Prior to 1793, the Party leaned to the Republicans, however a rift between radical and moderate republicans had led the Reform Party to shift towards the Federalists. Federalists pushed for the shift to a monarchist government in exchange for support, and after much debate, the change was accepted, provoking much outrage amongst Republicans and those in other states who perceived Pennsylvania as attempting to place their state before their own.

    Pennsylvania’s shift to a monarchical government would come with a cost: the only casualty of the Title War. On August 11th, Francis Wilkie, a Philadelphia shopkeep shot at Governor Thomas Mifflin while he was exiting church, only to miss and strike Governor Mifflin’s wife Sarah, mortally wounding her. Wilkie managed to escape, resulting in the largest manhunt in American history up to that point which Wilkie would avoid for over three years. Sarah Mifflin’s death surprisingly didn’t impact the Title War as Wilkie was believed to be a New Legionnaire, however upon his arrest in 1797, Wilkie would give a testimony “filled with the most foul blasphemies and profanities” that claimed he was acting under “the Brotherhood of the Fasces,” and that his actions were “revenge for Pennsylvania’s betrayal of the Republican cause.” A panic over the Brotherhood influenced the 1797 elections, but no such group actually existed; Wilkie suffered from some kind of mental illness, presumed to be dementia praecox by modern psychologists, and the Brotherhood was entirely a creation of his illness.

    Following Pennsylvania’s shift to a duchy, the Title War would be followed by further escalation. Virginia would change its title to “Electoric Grand Duchy” on September 4th, followed by North Carolina switching to an “Electorate” on the 6th. Governor Robert Yates of New York would declare his state a “Republic” on September 8th, only for the legislature to revert the title to “State” on the 9th, only to change again to a “Nomocratic Duchy” on the 12th. New Hampshire would declare the Regent-Republic of New Hampshire on the 19th, and Franklin would become the Landgraviate of Franklin on the 28th.

    South Carolina would escalate the situation even further on October 12th, declaring itself a “Free Electoric Grand Duchy.” Director Samuel Adams would comment on the state of affairs, remarking:

    “With each state taking more and more lavish titles, there must be a great wastage of inks. It would then be better for each state to simply declare itself a Kingdom...”

    The growing absurdity of the Title War was reaching a critical point as it was beginning to receive international attention and mockery. George III of Great Britain would remark on the situation:

    “Each state desires to wear the Purple, yet they do not realise they serve under a Marquis.”

    South Carolina’s October 12th title led to Virginian Alexander White, South Carolinian Andrew Pickens, and Marylander Richard Potts meet in Baltimore by the instruction of their states. Meeting through the winter in what came to be known as the First Baltimore Title Conference, the three men were attempting to negotiate a compromise to end the Title War. However restrictions placed upon them by their state governments prevented an actual compromise from forming. They did agree to try and assemble again with more delegates from more states, in the hope that an actual compromise could be made.
     
  12. The Merovingian To whom the Capets aspire.

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    Are all these titles for Gilbert, or are there governor declaring themselves dukes and such?
     
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  13. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Governors declaring for themselves, and state legislatures changing their state names. Prince Gilbert will be getting a formal title from this though, although none have actually been proposed by this point.
     
  14. LostInNewDelhi Anarcho-Shaivist

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    Ah, so it's not an actual war. Good. With actual interstate war raging at the moment, civil war a none-too-distant memory, and elections having already given their results, the various factions are venting their tensions through the only outlet for political campaigning that they can... As chaotic as it is, the drive toward greater formalization is a cause for optimism (at least, in the short- to mid-term).
     
  15. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    As you said, tensions remain, and they are stoking increased squabbling over small issues. Interstate fighting like this is going to be a semi-consistent situation as the various political factions jockey for political power, and it will be the chief engine of change during these early days.

    Also, spoilers for the titles the states have at the end of the Title War, but here are four of the flag and info snippets:

    South Carolina.png

    Georgia.png

    North Carolina.png

    Pennsylvania.png
     
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  16. LostInNewDelhi Anarcho-Shaivist

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    Why do the titles of the local heads of the government remain "Governor?" Not Elector or Duke?
     
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  17. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    None of the states mentioned there have actually elected a monarch yet, so I screwed up and forgot to put in a line for the regents.

    Most states will keep governors as an office, although a few will rename the position.
     
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  18. LostInNewDelhi Anarcho-Shaivist

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    Oh man. I'm imagining taking a walk through a street in 1870s Charleston, and finding a small barbecue joint with a little plaque saying "#1 Choice of the Most High and Esteemed Grand Tribune-General of the Electoral Regency" or something equally bizarre.
     
  19. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Or imagine going into a Kentucky Fried Chicken, and instead of the Colonel on the buckets, you get the Grand Nomocratic Elector-Colonel.

    Also, I have created a revised version of the info charts.

    South Carolina 2EB.png
    Georgia 2.png
    North Carolina 2.png
    Pennsylvania 2.png
     
  20. Schnozzberry Secretly illiterate

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    Hello everyone! Sorry this isn't an update, but a question for you all once again. I'm taking a creative writing course, and I'm preparing to shoot myself in the foot again by writing a story set in this timeline for the class. Thankfully the darker bits are OK with the professor (other people are doing stories with racists/racism in them), and since I'm not going set it in a location/time with any of the potentially contentious stuff (E.G. Albe-Mosquito, National Corporatism/Nikism, the Slave Revolt), I think this will be fine. However, I have a few ideas I can't decide between, and I know that I'm just as likely to try and do all of them if I don't decide on one. I will probably write all of them, but I need to focus on one now, thus, I would like to know which one you guys would most like to read.

    The story ideas I have been kicking around are:

    Atop Car #15: It's 1936, and the Republic of Sequoyah is in crisis. The Dust Bowl has led to the Great Plains descending into warlordism and famine. Starving refugees flow across the border, and the warlords launch ever daring raids into Sequoyard territory. As Sequoyard farms begin to fail as well, the republic undertakes emergency measures to import food to prevent famine. Trains depart for Dixie full of oil, and return with desperately needed foodstuffs. The story itself follows the 16 year old Archie Sprague as he leaves home to earn money to feed his family. Archie gets a job working for a railroad company, and is given a rather simple task: sit atop a railcar and shoot at anyone trying to stop the food-laden train from reaching its destination.

    The Death of Polk: A dark comedy vaguely inspired by The Death of Stalin. It follows events in the American South during the Civil War. Former Dictator James K. Polk assumed control of the political and military situation only to catch cholera six months in and die. Now command of the South lays in the hands of four men: Braxton Bragg, Gideon Pillow, John Bell Hood and Jefferson Davis, and the clash of arms becomes overshadowed by the clash of personalities.

    A Drunk's City: Set in Boston under Hopswood's regime, the story follows a shopkeep who has to deal with all of Hopswood and the Regulator's actions, and Forest Gumps his way into seeing a lot of the important events.

    What The Jungle Hides: After a famous adventurer returns from American Guiana claiming to have seen a city of demons in the Guianese jungle, an American accountant becomes obsessed with finding the demon city. After having dreams of faceless men that he believes to be guiding him, the accountant sets out into the jungles. This is a horror story, and in contrast to the other stories, this one would be the only story in which departs from a strictly reality-based framework as there will be some supernatural elements which are ambiguous as to whether or not they are real.

    Anywho, as I said, I do think I'll do all of these at some point, but I would really appreciate to hear which one you would like to see as it would help me guide my decision process for choosing for my class. Thanks for listening everyone!


    Also, so that way I add some actual content, here's the flag of American Guiana. It's not super cool or unique, but I'm envisioning it as being the "colonial" flag of Guiana.

    Guiana_USA.png

    not American Guiana though.png
     
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