Death of a Republic (A monarchical USA timeline)

How is the timeline so far?

  • It's good

    Votes: 198 64.5%
  • It's ok

    Votes: 62 20.2%
  • It's bad

    Votes: 3 1.0%
  • It's really bad

    Votes: 2 0.7%
  • It's gone to the Alien Space Bats

    Votes: 42 13.7%

  • Total voters
    307
Only two amendments have ever been repealed more than once; the Twelfth Amendment (1832, 1922) and the Fifteenth Amendment (1848, 1932). The First Amendment
Looks like three to me...

African Autonomy (modern day Autonomous Republic of New Africa in Dixie) in 1804.
What territory does this currently consist of, and how loyal is it to the empire?

Dictator Theodore Roosevelt would utilize the First Amendment to justify the removal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of ethnic Chinese from Oregon, California and the rest of the United States’ possessions back to the newly acquired Oriental Territory.
The implication here is that after this TLs World War, ehem Global War, America aquired Territory in Asia......I'm gonna guess....its the Philipines.......am I close?
 
Looks like three to me...
Ahh. This should say repealed twice, not more than once.

What territory does this currently consist of, and how loyal is it to the empire?

Roughly the southern 3/8ths of Mississippi and Alabama barring the coast. The AR New Africa is basically a black version of Scotland, so kinda unhappy at the lack of independence but at the same time independence is somewhat unviable.

And it is a part of the Republic of Dixie, so they aren't a too big of a fan of the American Empire. The Empire of Florida on the other hand...

The implication here is that after this TLs World War, ehem Global War, America aquired Territory in Asia......I'm gonna guess....its the Philipines.......am I close?

Closish, but the First Global War sets the stage for the next by overstretching the European and American colonial Empires to the point they all nearly fall apart, so what part of east Asia would do that if colonized?
 
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Roughly the southern 3/8ths of Mississippi and Alabama barring the coast. The AR New Africa is basically a black version of Scotland, so kinda unhappy at the lack of independence but at the same time independence is somewhat unviable.

And it is a part of the Republic of Dixie, so they aren't a too big of a fan of the American Empire. The Empire of Florida on the other hand...
My heart breaks at the thought of a balkanized America, but oh well, I'm excited to see future borders.

Closish, but the First Global War sets the stage for the next by overstretching the European and American colonial Empires to the point they all nearly fall apart, so what part of east Asia would do that if colonized?
.......all of them?
 
  1. When will the Republic of Dixie declare independence? Will you have the first President/Consul/whatever be Abraham Lincoln?
  2. I’m guessing that the implications of that last portion are that as the Americans lost territory they became more and more authoritarian. I’m picturing them in 2035 being an English-speaking version of Putin’s Russia. Ostensibly democratic but the Dictator continues to be re-elected due to the opposition either being arrested or dying before the election.
  3. Is the Empire of Florida under the control of the House of Walton?
 
  1. When will the Republic of Dixie declare independence? Will you have the first President/Consul/whatever be Abraham Lincoln?
  2. I’m guessing that the implications of that last portion are that as the Americans lost territory they became more and more authoritarian. I’m picturing them in 2035 being an English-speaking version of Putin’s Russia. Ostensibly democratic but the Dictator continues to be re-elected due to the opposition either being arrested or dying before the election.
  3. Is the Empire of Florida under the control of the House of Walton?

1. The Republic of Dixie breaks away in the immediate aftermath of the downfall of Roosevelt's Dictatorship. Lincoln will be a President but he's a tad late (and dead) to be Dixie's.
2. Its a bit worse than just Putinesque, I hope one of the reasons gives away exactly who took over between 2029 and 2035.
3. Yes. Hurricanes may try their damnedest to dislodge them, but Walton and his family cannot be dislodged.

will the empire lose all of the east coast?

Nope, after all Director of the State Friedrich Trump III is from New York, and how could we Make America Great Again without him and his Liberal Democrat Party?
 
Nope, after all Director of the State Friedrich Trump III is from New York, and how could we Make America Great Again without him and his Liberal Democrat Party?
I'm just trying to make a mental map of everything based on old comments and such and I remember you mentioning that New England breaks off to form its own republic, or semi-autonomous republic...that along the Dixi Republic makes me wonder if this is gonna be an America with only mild eastern coastline because you haven't assured the empire gets Canada....though it should.
 
It would be pretty (darkly) funny for the Oriental Territory to end up being part/all of Japan. Alternately, it could be some combination of Taiwan and Fujian. Still, certainly doesn't seem sustainable for an America with a lower population than OTL (being a lot more obsessed with preserving the demographic strength of "Citizens" and refusing to integrate as many immigrants) to be building a full-blown colonial empire.

In other news, this world needs a good dose of Austrian democracy :^)
 
1. The Republic of Dixie breaks away in the immediate aftermath of the downfall of Roosevelt's Dictatorship. Lincoln will be a President but he's a tad late (and dead) to be Dixie's.
2. Its a bit worse than just Putinesque, I hope one of the reasons gives away exactly who took over between 2029 and 2035.
3. Yes. Hurricanes may try their damnedest to dislodge them, but Walton and his family cannot be dislodged.
  1. Maybe it’s Robert Todd instead, then. Maybe one of the butterflies of this timeline is Thomas Lincoln taking his family south of Kentucky into Mississippi instead of north into Illinois.
  2. I don’t know who would be using that kind of language in modern-day America
  3. When will the Waltons officially set up their Empire?
  4. What is the next bit of territory to break away from the Union?
 
Heyo, sorry for the missed responses, I forgot I'm not getting email alerts anymore. But, good news is, I've got an update on the politics of America and the excitement of the first election!

I'm just trying to make a mental map of everything based on old comments and such and I remember you mentioning that New England breaks off to form its own republic, or semi-autonomous republic...that along the Dixi Republic makes me wonder if this is gonna be an America with only mild eastern coastline because you haven't assured the empire gets Canada....though it should.

There is my poor attempt at a propoganda postsr that shows a rough border of America post balkanization and what the propagandist wants to consider rightful American land.


It would be pretty (darkly) funny for the Oriental Territory to end up being part/all of Japan.

Commodore Perry gone nuts.

Still, certainly doesn't seem sustainable for an America with a lower population than OTL (being a lot more obsessed with preserving the demographic strength of "Citizens" and refusing to integrate as many immigrants) to be building a full-blown colonial empire.

My friend, you just hit the nail on the head why Theodore Roosevelt's Dictatorship for Life isn't very long.


  1. I don’t know who would be using that kind of language in modern-day America

Can I ask what this is in refrwnce to? Is it a political party, a biword for white Caucasian?

It is a race thing. For further details, think Lovecraftian.

  1. When will the Waltons officially set up their Empire

The elder Walton has to die.

Hi Schnoz, I just binged this timeline and I'm really enjoying it! Keep it up.
Thanks very much! Glad you are enjoying it.
 
The Election of 1791
“He will be the greatest man in the world.”
--George III on Robert Morris


With order returned to all states in the Cisappalachian region of the United States, the provisional appointment of Director of the People Robert Morris was approaching its end. After some debate, Congress decided to hold the election for Director of the People on July 4th, 1791, with plans to swear in the new Director of the People on January 4th, 1792, with the opening of the next years Congress. July 4th was chosen so as to tie the election with the celebration of American Independence; in the eyes of many there was no further patriotic action than being an involved citizen in your country.

As for the Director of the State, there existed some debate as to whether Madison should serve the remainder of his term out or whether the House of Representatives should elect a new Director of the State and synchronize the elections of the two Directors. The debate waged on throughout 1791, in no small part due to the question of whether or not James Madison could be reelected as Director of the State as it was unclear whether constitutionally Madison’s partial term counted as a proper term and thus would forbid his reelection. The end result of this debate was the Second Amendment to the Constitution which would be ratified in 1793 and dictated a revised method of removing Directors from office, how a replacement Director could be appointed (absent in the original Constitution surprisingly enough) and that no, even if a Director served a partial term of a single day, they could not be reelected.

The actual election for Director of the State, occurring between September 9th and September 12th was a relatively calm affair in contrast to the election of the Director of the People. Two main candidates emerged on the 9th, Massachusettsan John Adams, a federalist and Virginian Theodorick Bland Jr, a Confederationalist. A few other candidates, most notably Berkshirian representative Elbridge Gerry who saw some support from Republicans, were nominated and split the Confederationalist and Republican votes, leading to John Adams winning the Directorship by the slimmest of margins: thirty-five out of sixty-nine votes in the House of Representatives.

In contrast, the election for Director of the People would prove to be an absolute mess. The main political factions: Federalists, Confederationalists and Republicans would begin to haphazardly coelesce into political parties which in turn began to suffer from political infighting. The first American political party to form was, somewhat ironically, the Republican Party. The Republican Party formed around a core of politicians who were backing one of the earliest supporters of the American Revolution, the aging Samuel Adams, for the Directorship. Initially one of the anti-federalists and opposed to the Constitution, Adams attempted to gain support from those relatively neutral on the monarchy by promoting a more federalist platform which is a large element of how Adams eventually became America’s first elected Director. However, this political switch alienated many of the more radical republicans which eventually led to the establishment of the Republican Whig Party in 1794, or as it was later known, the Libertarian Republican Party that would split the Republican vote in future elections.

The Federalists saw infighting from almost the very beginning as many of the leading Federalists had conflicting views on the nation, monarchy and arguably chief above all, taxes. In contrast to the Republicans who formed a relatively coherent and united campaign, the Federalists would split their vote between two candidates: Nathaniel Gorham and Thomas Pinckney. Gorham, along with Alexander Hamilton, had devised the original all plan for monarchy in the USA in the first place. While this significantly boosted Gorham's popularity amongst monarchists and stauncher Federalists, it alienated many who were still fairly uncertain on Federalism and Monarchism. This led to Thomas Pinckney, the former South Carolinian governor who screwed the pooch when it came to dealing with the early New African rebellion, running as well. Seen by many as a moderate or “compromise” Federalist, Pinckney was a more attractive candidate for the Federalists who lived in the northern Republican states. The fighting between Federalists weakened their position, handing the election to Samuel Adams. This led to the establishment of the Federalist Party in 1792 as both the “whigs” (Pinckney supporters) and the “tories” (Gorham supporters) were unwilling to led their differences hand the Republicans another election.

The Confederationalists, despite being the largest faction, performed the poorest of the major political groups. This is in no small part due to the fact that no Confederationalists candidate truly stood out, and unlike the Federalists and the Republicans, the Confederationalists were almost entirely disunited. Further complicating the issue for the Confederationalists was that all Confederationalist candidates were regional. John Rutledge, the most prominent Confederationalist candidate, primarily received votes in the South, while the Governor of Massachusetts, Daniel Shays, received a number of votes for the Directorship entirely from Massachusetts and Berkshire.

A few minor groups also ran, albeit with little success. The remains of the Regulators under the leadership of Goodwill Henry would receive 1,164 votes, primarily from Hudson, Vermont, and Berkshire. Curiously, the Regulator vote count is the only vote count which survived intact after an accidental fire in 1819 burned many government records. Also contesting in the election were the Red Crosses, whose founder, Benjamin Meiners launched what was arguably the first political campaign in America, touring the Southern states harmed by the New African Rebellion. Promising to move all of America’s black population back to Africa, Meiners made many enemies in the Southern elite which eventually led to Miners being arrested in South Carolina for “being a threat to private property.”

The actual election was held with little violence, a surprising fact considering that only two years earlier many of the Republicans had been rebels who flew a flag that said “Liberty or Death.” Despite the peaceful nature of the election, the results of the election threatened to reopen old wounds; Samuel Adams had won the election with only 34% of the vote. Thomas Pinckney had received 27%, while Gorham had received 24% which meant that Federalists had received an absolute majority but split between two candidates. Additionally, Adams had won with a minority of the vote and yet the Constitution called for an election by the popular vote. Some feared that the Federalists might revolt, that Robert Morris would refuse to step down to Samuel Adams, while others feared that with the expansion of the military that a new Dictator would be elected and rule as a military dictator in manner like Oliver Cromwell. Some Republicans feared that Prince Gilbert would himself assume command. Nevertheless, Samuel Adams would be sworn in as Director of the People alongside his cousin, John Adams on January 4th, 1792 without threat.

For the first time Americans had held a peaceful election as a country. On that cold winter's day, America shone brighter than it ever had - or would.
 
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