DBWI: Mario Cuomo Doesn't Run in 1992

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Amadeus, Jan 1, 2019.

  1. Amadeus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    I was surprised that the Democrats captured the Governor's mansions in Ohio and Florida. Florida and Ohio are bellwether states, so this doesn't look great for the Republicans in 2020. On the bright side, the GOP took the Governorship of California and Charlie Baker narrowly won the Governorship of Massachusetts. So if they can win in these most liberal of states, the Republicans still have a chance in 2020.
     
  2. TheAllTimeGreatest Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2018
    Aside from California, I was thoroughly surprised by the GOP pickup in Oregon. It was probably due to the whole corruption thing surrounding Kate Brown and her predecessor, which allowed Chris Dudley to win.
     
  3. Cybercat Member

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    Mar 10, 2018
    I think the biggest surprise for me by far was Stacy Abraham’s comfortable win in Georgia that also netted the Democrats a lot of other statewide seats
     
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  4. TheAllTimeGreatest Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2018
    So, I was looking over an in-depth article from FiveThirtyEight from the 2016 presidential election. I noticed some trends that shocked me.

    Romney ended up making significant ground on groups that have usually voted Democratic in the past. For example, while Romney handily won over both white men and white women voters, he ended up getting 38% of the African American vote, 43% of the Hispanic vote, and 46% of the Asian American vote. While Biden did end up winning these groups (besides the white vote), Romney was able to make tremendous gains in these areas unseen by any Republican nominee in decades. And, in the 2014 and 2016 cycles for House and Senate elections, we saw a more diverse crowd of Republican Senators and Congressmen, filled with more African Americans, Asian-Americans, and women than ever before. Even though this past Congress elected a large amount of those groups from the Democratic Party, most of them from the party’s more progressive wing, it’s still standing that the Republican Party is moving towards a more diverse future.

    A few questions: where do you think this will lead for the Republican Party in the future, where do you think this change started, and who are major power players in the future for either party?
     
  5. Amadeus Well-Known Member

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    Mar 19, 2017
    I think it will keep both parties competitive at the national level. This is in stark contrast to 1992-2008, when the GOP managed to win only one presidential election in sixteen years. Vice-President Jindal is the frontrunner for 2020, but unfortunately for the Republicans most of their other heavy hitters went down in 2018. Scott lost to Nelson in Florida, King was beaten by Gillibrand in New York, and of course Cruz lost his Texas Senate seat to O'Rourke after only one term. On the Democratic side you have Booker, Sanders, Warren, and Harris - who is expected to announce her candidacy on MLK Day.
     
  6. TheAllTimeGreatest Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2018
    I wouldn’t worry too much about other front runners. I heard Secretary of State Nikki Haley is expected to run, and will be the front runner if Jindal doesn’t run. I actually heard Senators Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, and Dino Rossi might run as well. Senator Heather Wilson from New Mexico might also run as well. Hell, I even heard Senator Mia Love, who just won her Senate seat in 2018, might run as well. Again, this may all be if Jindal doesn’t run, but it appears that for both parties, you have a wide open field of diverse candidates.
     
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