DBWI: Axis Japan, Allied USSR

An allied URSS mean that Italy will probably side with the Axis instead of remain neutral, while Mussolini commerced with the URSS and basically built the Red Navy a formal alliance was out of the question for both pratical (both Italy and URSS wanted the same thing aka a lot of influence in the balkans), ideological (fascism gain power in Italy on a very anti-communist platform and the king will have never permitted such alliance and i don't even talk about the problem with the Pope) and personal (Benny ego was too big to even entertain the notion that he must share 2 place in the alliance with Stalin...he will have barely accepted that Germany was number one)
 
Let's also not forget the implications of if the USSR was on the side of the Allies. They were one of the most populous countries of the time, and the largest landwise, so who's to say that had they been on the side of the Allies, they wouldn't overtake the UK as the US' competitor later on.

Mind you, the main reason the UK was able to rival the US afterwards was because they were relatively undamaged compared to the rest of Europe. That, and the fact that many colonies of theirs, most notably India and Hong Kong, had their sense of nationalism dramatically reduced due to how, as @KingOnTheEdge mentoned, the UK prioritized the survival of those two places over even the home Isles sometimes.
Personally i feel the empire was saved, somewhat ironically, by making strides over the course of the 50s toward civil rights and federalization. Of course, it drew its detractors "British India, not Indian Britain" being a popular phrase, but funny thing- as nationalism faded over the decade, so did the indian indentity, and most went back to the bengali/delhi/punjabi, etc. As late as 66, the Raj system was being phased out as the indian states wanted autonomy within india, but not to seperate from the empire.
 
Personally i feel the empire was saved, somewhat ironically, by making strides over the course of the 50s toward civil rights and federalization. Of course, it drew its detractors "British India, not Indian Britain" being a popular phrase, but funny thing- as nationalism faded over the decade, so did the indian indentity, and most went back to the bengali/delhi/punjabi, etc. As late as 66, the Raj system was being phased out as the indian states wanted autonomy within india, but not to seperate from the empire.
There are theories that Hindu-Muslim relationship in India was basically a ticking time bomb if the Brits somehow left India to their own device.

They still kind of resenting the Brits, but Brits are much preferable compared to what would happen without them.
 
Another thing regarding the Cold War is how it all began. A big part of the reason it flared up was the issue of what the fate of the post-war USSR should be. The UK and Japan both wanted to take up the parts of the USSR they had taken over in the war, something the US and Brazil duly opposed. Not helping matter was that the British went back on their promise to let Afghanistan be independent again, and instead absorbed it into the Commonwealth of India. While most in the Commonwealth saw its takeover as a necessary evil to rebuilt the nation and modernize it, that still was something of a d**k move on the UK's part.

Meanwhile, China was hoping to get the parts of Eastern Siberia that the Allies had managed to seize during the war, but Japan made it clear that was not going to happen unless they were allowed to keep Manchuria. This of course meant the idea was thrown away faster than you can say "Co-Prosperity Sphere".
 
Japan made it clear that was not going to happen unless they were allowed to keep Manchuria. This of course meant the idea was thrown away faster than you can say "Co-Prosperity Sphere".
And despite China's US-backed protests and one-time almost going in full-scale attack during the height of The Cold War, Manchuria, Korea, and Yakutsk Siberian Territories are still being Japan's, even as they do made them somewhat more autonomous nowadays with Kings of Korea (former Joseon dynasty), Manchu (former Qing dynasty), and Yakutsk (former Sakha Chieftain), being made into vassal Kings of the Japanese Emperor. This arrangement does annoyed the hell of Republic of China to no end with how their former Emperors now literally bowing to The Japanese Emperor each year.
 
And despite China's US-backed protests and one-time almost going in full-scale attack during the height of The Cold War, Manchuria, Korea, and Yakutsk Siberian Territories are still being Japan's, even as they do made them somewhat more autonomous nowadays with Kings of Korea (former Joseon dynasty), Manchu (former Qing dynasty), and Yakutsk (former Sakha Chieftain), being made into vassal Kings of the Japanese Emperor. This arrangement does annoyed the hell of Republic of China to no end with how their former Emperors now literally bowing to The Japanese Emperor each year.
IIRC, the fact is China simply agreed to letting Japan keep Yalkutsk if they got back Manchuria once Chairman Mao was taken out.
 
Hold up- let's say that the soviets overtake Britain, and they and America force a 'decolonization' period. The Dominions would likely be the first to go. What would that mean for South Africa?

Otl, durning the imperial civil rights movement, south Africa resisted Heavily, and the resulting Race War/Independence Revolt (though it was only that for the whites and Boer population) discredited dominionism, and the federation model was implemented by 67.

But if Britain is retreating from this act of the world stage, they're certainly not going to be trying to get S.A to grow up. I really don't want to think about what happens but it needs to be mentioned
 
But if Britain is retreating from this act of the world stage, they're certainly not going to be trying to get S.A to grow up. I really don't want to think about what happens but it needs to be mentioned
Considering the fact that the Eisenhower Administration would support so many dictators simply for opposing the British, I like to think that they'd at least take a quick pause to find out why South Africa was opposing the British.
 
Considering the fact that the Eisenhower Administration would support so many dictators simply for opposing the British, I like to think that they'd at least take a quick pause to find out why South Africa was opposing the British.
I dunno man... Ike and his successors were seriously patriotic, and it cost him. By the time the cold war ended in the 70s, america had lost a lot of influence. We used to be the Kingmakers in South America. Now? Brazil, formerly our most stable and democratic ally, is an Empire again because of our recession in 72 causing unrest and Britain intervening in the civil war (payback for helping the Viet Minh in French Indochina of course)
 
IIRC, the fact is China simply agreed to letting Japan keep Yalkutsk if they got back Manchuria once Chairman Mao was taken out.
The interpretation if Japan and Britain reneging on their promise to China to "Return" Manchuria (and thus also Shandong - Hong Kong - Macau territories) is one of the reason why Cold War started at the first place.

The Anglo-Nippon bloc actually agreed to return those territories to China under the condition of Qing restoration as a constitutional monarchy, partially because those territories are technically "bought/leased" from the Qing Dynasty. Something that the Kuomintang obviously disagreed upon, as Chiang Kai-Shek was said to fear the popularity of King Pujie of Manchuria (who ascended to the throne as Vassal King of Japan after his brother, the last Emperor of China, was assassinated by a Communist). Since Chiang repeatedly insisted of China keeping their republican system of government, the reunification obviously never happened, Manchuria and Shandong ended up being kept by Japan, Hong Kong stays as British Colony (with extra clause: until Qing Restoration happened), and Macau stays as a Brazil-Portugual one (the same with Hong Kong).

I dunno man... Ike and his successors were seriously patriotic, and it cost him. By the time the cold war ended in the 70s, america had lost a lot of influence. We used to be the Kingmakers in South America. Now? Brazil, formerly our most stable and democratic ally, is an Empire again because of our recession in 72 causing unrest and Britain intervening in the civil war (payback for helping the Viet Minh in French Indochina of course)
Installing Duarte Nuno as Emperor Duarte I of Brazil AND Portugal is definitely Britain's ultimate "F-You" against US' attempt to meddle in both nations. The resulting Reunited Kingdoms of Brazil-Portugal then managed to stabilize most of the Portuguese Imperial Territories, much to US' dismay seeing those independence movements petered out.
 
I dunno man... Ike and his successors were seriously patriotic, and it cost him. By the time the cold war ended in the 70s, america had lost a lot of influence. We used to be the Kingmakers in South America. Now? Brazil, formerly our most stable and democratic ally, is an Empire again because of our recession in 72 causing unrest and Britain intervening in the civil war (payback for helping the Viet Minh in French Indochina of course)
Well, at least it seems that the US and UK now are trying to reconcile their differences; in the words of Walt Disney on the matter, "Are well all not democracies?"
 
On the subject of Manchuria... wonder how different the reputation of Manchuria’s rulers would be in such a situation? Alright, Puyi was a failure of a human being on multiple levels, and Wanrong was a pitiable figure until she managed to kick her opium habit, but Pujie is well-remembered, post-detox Wanrong free from the traditions of an Empress’ life became a pretty major figure in charitable endeavours, and Princess Xianyu is a Manchu national heroine for leading irregular units against the Soviets (as well as bring a gay icon for being, well, a badass bisexual woman who tended to dress like a man, but that’s another story). But with Axis Japan... they might have been other things altogether...
 
Let's also not forget who the Nazi-Soviet Alliance was the kick in the nuts that France needed to really prepare for the prospect of another invasion. They pretty much learned from Poland's mistakes, and prepare escape routes for all their navy to either Scotland or Algeria.
 
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Another thing that made the Axis almost certain to fail, other than the over-confident dictators, was the fact that none of the three key powers really liked each other at all. Hitler hated Stalin because the latter was a communist. Stalin hated both Hitler and Admiral Horthy because he saw them as the bourgeoise. Horthy despised Stalin for the same reasons as Hitler, but also was also repulsed by Hitler because of his genocidal hatred of so many groups.

At the end of the day, it's a small wonder why the Allies would turn German and Hungarians POWs against the Soviets then release them under Allied management. Even with the four atom bombs, they were going to need all the manpower they could find. The Allies knew that it would likely mean that historical denialism would spring up in both countries later, but it's pretty clear that they simply thought that was worth dealing with later if it meant the USSR was defeated more quickly.
 
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All this actually reminds me of how some pop culture got inspired by the war. Most notably how the Soviets overtook the Nazis as the main villains in the Indiana Jones series after The Last Crusade. Hell, I'm not sure Japan would be too proud of its past if they went through with allying with the Nazis, you know all those anime and manga productions with the motif of defending your cultural traditions from a degenerate empire? I'm sure many of those would be butterflied, and the ones that wouldn't be would likely take on different forms.
 
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All this actually reminds me of how some pop culture got inspired by the war. Most notably how the Soviets overtook the Nazis as the main villains in the Indiana Jones series after The Last Crusade. Hell, I'm not sure Japan would be too proud of its past if they went through with allying with the Nazis, you know all those anime and manga productions where the motif of defending your cultural traditions from a degenerate empire? I'm sure many of those would be butterflied, and the ones that wouldn't be would likely take on different forms.
Well there's like no Tsar-Rock*, Portuguese food doesn't become big in the PNW after people left due to the Forced Restoration, and american wine and vodka wouldn't be the best in the world (ignoring Russia and italy)

Ooc: tsar rock is like otl's metal with a lot of eastern European influences. Much like how metal and rock have anarchist influences, Tsar Rock is more leftwing than a lot of other homegrown music, coming from the soviet union's dying husk- but it's also more religious than those genre.
 
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Well there's like no Tsar-Rock*, Portuguese food doesn't become big in the PNW after people left due to the Forced Restoration, and american wine and vodka wouldn't be the best in the world (ignoring Russia and italy)
Let's also remember how one reason Anime became as big in the US was that, in addition to the general deterioration of American animation, it felt more like stuff that had something for all sorts of people other than families. Not to mention how British Animation became popular in the US for those same and similar reasons.
 
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Forced Restoration?
It's another name for british support of the restoration of the Portuguese monarchy. The governing instability sent a lot of Portuguese immigrants to America, mostly California and the PNW where the exposure to the Relatively Similar mexican culture was higher. Of course a lot of them went to new York, but they kinda assimilated, unlike here in the PNW. Seattle's been called "Little Lisbon" for a while, for example
 
It's another name for british support of the restoration of the Portuguese monarchy. The governing instability sent a lot of Portuguese immigrants to America, mostly California and the PNW where the exposure to the Relatively Similar mexican culture was higher. Of course a lot of them went to new York, but they kinda assimilated, unlike here in the PNW. Seattle's been called "Little Lisbon" for a while, for example
Ah, now I remember. Miguel Gomes was born in Seattle because of all that strife.
 
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