Danish North America

Can Denmark,-Norway colonize North America if they start earlier?

They have an advantage of having Iceland which is both a good transit station and a good source of population.
 
It's more amazing that they didn't colonise North America outside of the Danish Virgin Islands and technically Greenland. My guess is they got too bogged down in wars with Sweden. Greenland is an interesting case, since German explorer Didrik Pining (who was sailing on the orders of the Danish king) visited it (and may have visited Newfoundland or Labrador) in the 1470s. While the Greenlandic Norse had abandoned their colony by that point and farming was all but impossible, Greenland would make a perfectly good colony for sealing, whaling, fishing, and whatever trade with the Inuit you might conduct. So perhaps Denmark establishes a base there in the late 15th century for that purpose. From there, Pining might venture to Newfoundland before Cabot around 1490 and perhaps discover the Grand Banks where Denmark will take control of the country using their claim on Greenland and Vinland for legitimacy.

By the early 16th century, Denmark should have settlements in Newfoundland and perhaps have charted most of the Eastern seaboard. OTL the admiral Søren Norby was told by the king of Denmark Christian II to find a way to the West Indies by way of Greenland, yet the rebellion of Gustav Vasa in Sweden and the subsequent end of the Kalmar Union (and Christian II's rule) disrupted those plans. I would think we'd want the Kalmar Union to remain intact for maximal Danish colonisation (much as Scotland was involved in English colonisation, Sweden and Finland might be as well for Denmark), but given Norby's exile from Denmark we'd at least want Christian II to not be deposed in 1523.

What might Denmark be able to settle and hold? Maybe a Caribbean empire as big as the Dutch Caribbean and probably most or all of Canada or at the very least the Maritimes, Quebec, and perhaps most of Ontario. They could establish themselves early in the fur trade and reap large profits as well as make plenty of native allies as a hedge against anyone else who wants to settle in North America.
 
It's more amazing that they didn't colonise North America outside of the Danish Virgin Islands and technically Greenland. My guess is they got too bogged down in wars with Sweden. Greenland is an interesting case, since German explorer Didrik Pining (who was sailing on the orders of the Danish king) visited it (and may have visited Newfoundland or Labrador) in the 1470s. While the Greenlandic Norse had abandoned their colony by that point and farming was all but impossible, Greenland would make a perfectly good colony for sealing, whaling, fishing, and whatever trade with the Inuit you might conduct. So perhaps Denmark establishes a base there in the late 15th century for that purpose. From there, Pining might venture to Newfoundland before Cabot around 1490 and perhaps discover the Grand Banks where Denmark will take control of the country using their claim on Greenland and Vinland for legitimacy.

By the early 16th century, Denmark should have settlements in Newfoundland and perhaps have charted most of the Eastern seaboard. OTL the admiral Søren Norby was told by the king of Denmark Christian II to find a way to the West Indies by way of Greenland, yet the rebellion of Gustav Vasa in Sweden and the subsequent end of the Kalmar Union (and Christian II's rule) disrupted those plans. I would think we'd want the Kalmar Union to remain intact for maximal Danish colonisation (much as Scotland was involved in English colonisation, Sweden and Finland might be as well for Denmark), but given Norby's exile from Denmark we'd at least want Christian II to not be deposed in 1523.

What might Denmark be able to settle and hold? Maybe a Caribbean empire as big as the Dutch Caribbean and probably most or all of Canada or at the very least the Maritimes, Quebec, and perhaps most of Ontario. They could establish themselves early in the fur trade and reap large profits as well as make plenty of native allies as a hedge against anyone else who wants to settle in North America.

It may depend population wise. Economically speaking, the Virgin Islands would be far more valuable than wasting money and taxpayers for a risky North American Colony.

I mean, if most colonists were Germans from the HRE, you have colonists. Only capital remains to fund such plans.
 
It may depend population wise. Economically speaking, the Virgin Islands would be far more valuable than wasting money and taxpayers for a risky North American Colony.

I mean, if most colonists were Germans from the HRE, you have colonists. Only capital remains to fund such plans.
OTL example of Portugal and England already shows you don't need high populations to have many settlers compared to other colonizers like France or frankly even Spain who didn't really use the max demographic potential of their homelands in terms of settlers.
 
Their policy toward the indigenous peoples of Canada may also be influenced by their lower population.. For instance, they may be inclined to focus on trading, alliances and intermarriage as conflict between the less populated colonies and the natives would not really be in their interest.
 
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