Could the Vistula-Oder offensive have reached Berlin?

Apparently after they stopped on the oder there were basically no intact units between the front and Berlin. OTL Zhukov was worried about his flanks, and spent a few weeks mopping up the germans in east Prussia. If he decided not to do this, and instead charges into Berin, can the Soviets get there two monthe earlier?
 
Apparently after they stopped on the oder there were basically no intact units between the front and Berlin. OTL Zhukov was worried about his flanks, and spent a few weeks mopping up the germans in east Prussia. If he decided not to do this, and instead charges into Berin, can the Soviets get there two monthe earlier?

Not only in Prussia but in Pomerania too. Soviets may try to continue offensive past Oder, but would have German units hanging above their right flank all the way from Oder to Prussia.

Risky.
 
Not only in Prussia but in Pomerania too. Soviets may try to continue offensive past Oder, but would have German units hanging above their right flank all the way from Oder to Prussia.

Risky.
Not to mention that the Nazis would likely continue fighting even if the Soviets reached Berlin in February. Hitler actually refused Guderian's request in January 1945 to send the 6th SS Panzer Army to defend Berlin and instead sent it to launch an offensive against the Soviets in Hungary, as he during that time considered holding the Hungarian oil area and Austria to be more important than Berlin (though he did also hope that a successful offensive in Hungary might make the Soviets divert some forces to Hungary and thus potentially allow another German offensive to reverse the gains made by the Soviets in the Vistula-Oder offensive).
 
The Soviet Army during 1945 launched a series of successful offensives, each advancing roughly equivalent distances before suddenly stopping despite seemingly little or no increase in German resistance. HGW Davie convincingly argues that this was driven by the Soviet logistics system, which was unable to support advances indefinitely. Soviet columns on the attack, especially armored units, carried their own supplies with them rather than receiving constant resupply, and therefore had to halt once the supplies they were able to carry had run out. I suspect that the Vistula-Oder offensive had run into the same logistical limitations as other Soviet offensives, and that therefore attempts to press on would have proven less successful than a simple comparison of forces available to each side would suggest.
 
The Soviets will succeed if the Red Army tries, but the problem is the Germans could still inflict heavy damage on them. As one OP said, the Fall of Berlin would probably mean a stiffer resistance compared to OTL's VE Day.
 
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