Confederate Missouri or Kentucky

Which is more likely to be given to the Confederacy, Missouri or Kentucky

  • Missouri

    Votes: 9 11.3%
  • Kentucky

    Votes: 71 88.8%

  • Total voters
    80
  • Poll closed .
Hello Lads and Lasses,

I was wondering, in the board's opinion, out of Kentucky and Missouri, which would be more likely to have been given to the Confederacy in the event of an early war victory, either wholly or partitioned?
 
Kentucky. Slavery was moving toward death in Missouri, and there was an active Republican Party in St. Louis. Plus, Missouri projects much too far north and cuts off the Union from large parts of the West.
 
I know that Kentucky is usually the one given to the Confederacy, but I always thought Missouri (although it looks really odd in a map), would have been more likely to join the CSA.
 
I'd say Kentucky. I haven't lived in Missouri long, but while I've been here and reading up on its history, it seems that the people were pretty adamant about staying out of the Confederacy (and keeping the Union troops out as well, it seems.)

I don't think the Union would have 'given' anything to the Confederacy, though. Letting them keep the states that already seceded would be the best the Confeds could hope for, and even then West Virginia ducked out.
 
I'd say Kentucky. I haven't lived in Missouri long, but while I've been here and reading up on its history, it seems that the people were pretty adamant about staying out of the Confederacy (and keeping the Union troops out as well, it seems.)

I don't think the Union would have 'given' anything to the Confederacy, though. Letting them keep the states that already seceded would be the best the Confeds could hope for, and even then West Virginia ducked out.
As 2/3rds of Kentucians supported the Union it is a non-starter for it to be a voluntary part of the CSA.
Missouri broke the same IIRC.
 
As 2/3rds of Kentucians supported the Union it is a non-starter for it to be a voluntary part of the CSA.
Missouri broke the same IIRC.
I agree, but I figured in any scenario the CSA would have to control some part of one of the states in question as a 'bargaining chip'. In this scenario, I can see them holding some eastern corner of Kentucky (itself highly unlikely.)
 
I agree, but I figured in any scenario the CSA would have to control some part of one of the states in question as a 'bargaining chip'. In this scenario, I can see them holding some eastern corner of Kentucky (itself highly unlikely.)
Was the eastern corner even Confederate sympathizing?

Also, bargaining chip? The Confederacy would be have to be wildly successful to not have to use any bargaining chips from such things to simply retain all its pre-Union response territory.
 
Was the eastern corner even Confederate sympathizing?

Also, bargaining chip? The Confederacy would be have to be wildly successful to not have to use any bargaining chips from such things to simply retain all its pre-Union response territory.
I'm trying to answer the question without picking at the faults of the question itself. And I don't believe the Cumberland area was sympathetic, no. Could be wrong, not up on my inner regional civil war history.
 
I'm trying to answer the question without picking at the faults of the question itself. And I don't believe the Cumberland area was sympathetic, no. Could be wrong, not up on my inner regional civil war history.
Fair enough.

Though the question does raise the question, by its nature, of how the Confederacy is in a position to ask for either.
 
I'm trying to answer the question without picking at the faults of the question itself. And I don't believe the Cumberland area was sympathetic, no. Could be wrong, not up on my inner regional civil war history.
The Cumberland River area in Kentucky is the center of the state, the Confederate soldiers (mainly The Orphans Brigade) came from this area and The Bluegrass area. Then so did a like number or more Union troops The far east (Appalachia) part of Kentucky I know not for sure.

A funny aside Jeff Davis was born in what is now Fairview,Christian County Kentucky. His state park and monument ( similar but half the height of the Washington Monument) is in Todd County Ky on the Christian County line. Todd county voted 2 to 1 against the articles of succession.
Of course Davis may not have been a natural born citizen and just claimed to be fron KY you see if he was born there his Cavalry under Lyon's Bde of Forrest's command burnt the Christian County Courthose in Hopkinsville Ky during the Nashville Campaign.:eek:
 
Fair enough.

Though the question does raise the question, by its nature, of how the Confederacy is in a position to ask for either.
we could just say its a TL-191 setup for simplicity, early victories along with foreign recognition and aid
 
The Cumberland River area in Kentucky is the center of the state, the Confederate soldiers (mainly The Orphans Brigade) came from this area and The Bluegrass area. Then so did a like number or more Union troops The far east (Appalachia) part of Kentucky I know not for sure.

A funny aside Jeff Davis was born in what is now Fairview,Christian County Kentucky. His state park and monument ( similar but half the height of the Washington Monument) is in Todd County Ky on the Christian County line. Todd county voted 2 to 1 against the articles of succession.
Of course Davis may not have been a natural born citizen and just claimed to be fron KY you see if he was born there his Cavalry under Lyon's Bde of Forrest's command burnt the Christian County Courthose in Hopkinsville Ky during the Nashville Campaign.:eek:
I was talking about the Cumberland city area, which is in the southeast portion.
 
Thought you might have been thinking Cumberland Gap which isn't in Kentucky. You can see my problem as Kentuckians are going to think River not town when you just say Cumberland. Unless you is one of the few peeples from C City.:cool:
Not me, but a friend from the army.
 
we could just say its a TL-191 setup for simplicity, early victories along with foreign recognition and aid
So, ASB then?

Because while you might, might see foreign recognition - you won't see Britain or France sending armies and fleets.

And even if the Confederacy does secure Kentucky or Missouri, it'll have to be using bargaining chips to get back say, New Orleans.
 
Neither, as the CSA had no power projection capabilities at a meaningful level. It does, however, have a chance with Don Carlos Buell grabbing the idiot ball to smash the Hell out of the Army of the Ohio in 1862, which means it may do better in Kentucky for a bit than it ever did in Missouri.
 
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