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My horrific attempt at making a map of Cinco de Mayo's Europe as of 1892. Note Alsace-Lorraine still being French, Luxembourg being part of Germany, the advancement of Russia into Central Asia, and the independence of Serbia, Romania and Montenegro but the OE still having a cohesive and substantive presence in the Balkans.

Map template originated here
 
Chamberlain's Britain
"...Spencer's resignation stunned Westminster and British society, even though the split in the Liberals could be seen a mile away. A broader land purchase act was what brought it down; Spencer, in coordination with many Tories, sought to deliver an Act solely expanding the purchase rights to tenants in Ireland, by opening up more tenants and land to the rolls and for the first time providing funds, hoping this would finally end the Plan of Campaign and kneecap the IPP. Chamberlain, fearing this would irritate Whigs within the party and polarize the Irish Question again - and potentially give ground to the remnant Home Rulers within the party, primarily Ripon, introduced a competing bill that would extend the same rights to Scotland, hoping to pacify crofters and bring promised land reform to a Liberal bastion. Other radicals agitated for an even broader bill, expanding land reform to the whole of Britain. Land reform having been what brought down Hartington's government, Spencer balked at what he knew would be aggressive opposition in the Lords. Sensing that he was out of step with the party and losing his base, rather than work for a compromise as NLF meetings in the spring of 1892 demanded "the Full Reform," Spencer tendered his resignation to Queen Victoria on March 15, 1892, shocking Britain. Even more shocking was Spencer's recommendation to the infirm Victoria and Prince Arthur, almost always at her side for these meetings - that the body politic of the Liberal Party as constituted after its groundswell election of 1892 would be best served by Chamberlain, who had moderated since his world tour and could now appeal to the remaining Whigs without threatening to break the party asunder. Victoria was alarmed by the suggestion but, as was her tradition, reluctantly took her outgoing Prime Minister's advice. She called upon Joseph Chamberlain to Buckingham Palace the next morning to kiss hands and form a government.

For the former unreformed Radical mayor of Birmingham, the moment had arrived. Just five years earlier his career had seemed as dead in the water as that of his Tory friend Randolph Churchill; now, he was headed to Downing Street, at the head of the most reform-minded Liberal government in British history. Changes were immediate; Chamberlain promoted a remarkably NLF-dominated Cabinet, assigning his old friend Dilke the Chancellorship, Herbert Henry Asquith the Home Office, Lord Ripon the Foreign Office, Henry Campbell-Bannerman Presidency of the Local Government Board, Harcourt the War Ministry, Kimberley the Viceroyalty of India, and George Trevelyan the Colonial Office. John Morley would take over the Presidency of the Board of Trade, despite his cool relationship with Chamberlain due to divergent views over Ireland; Henry Gladstone, son of the former Liberal leader, was made Chief Secretary of Ireland, where he could cause the new Prime Minister less trouble. The elevation of Chamberlain over Spencer's expected successor, Frederick Cavendish, alienated the Hartington faction; they were mollified with Hartington being made Lord President of the Council and the outgoing Spencer made Lord Privy Seal. Nonetheless, it was a Radical Cabinet; perhaps most personified in the person of Jesse Collings, the Mancunian Radical reform campaigner placed as President of the Land Commission, which Chamberlain made a Cabinet-level office, and who held the portfolio for not only the coming land reforms but the overhaul of British education that would mark Chamberlain's great legacy as well..."

- Chamberlain's Britain
 
View attachment 633529

My horrific attempt at making a map of Cinco de Mayo's Europe as of 1892. Note Alsace-Lorraine still being French, Luxembourg being part of Germany, the advancement of Russia into Central Asia, and the independence of Serbia, Romania and Montenegro but the OE still having a cohesive and substantive presence in the Balkans.

Map template originated here
The map is decent, don’t sell yourself short. Can’t wait for the Asian, North and South American maps.
 
The Eaglet Takes Flight: The Reign of Napoleon IV 1874-1905
"...the government's next body blow came with the revelation of the Panama scandal, of the vast fraud perpetrated on investors and the bribes doled out by the Canal Company and de Lesseps to grease the wheels for the stock issue of the now-bankrupt concern. The partially-dug canal in Colombia was unused, now little more than a mass grave for hundreds of coolies from China and Southeast Asia impressed for the backbreaking work; hundreds of legislators and dozens of junior ministers were found to have taken bribes. Napoleon was stunned by the way the scandal consumed French public opinion; caricatures in normally Tuileries-friendly press raged against the monarchist Assembly, threatening to bring down his pliant parliamentary majority. Thankfully, his inner circle had not touched the investments themselves, but for a country still reeling from the fraud at the Union Generale that had brought down the Bourse and with it the economy, the matter was another crack in the prestige of the Bonaparte regime. Boulanger aggressively pressed judges for maximum sentences; de Lesseps and Eiffel, another major member of the Canal Company, both received twenty year terms in prison, and the Eiffel Tower was renamed the "Tour Imperiale" from then on, in an effort to scrub his name from the landmark (since restored to its original name, of course). Street protests against politicians threatened to turn into protests against the Bonapartes; the early 1890s were perhaps the most fractious time of Napoleon IV's rule, and with it came a new surge of support for radicalism, republicanism, and in many cases, such as the pages of the newspaper Libre Parole, anti-Semitism, soon to be an aggressive force within French politics..."

- The Eaglet Takes Flight: The Reign of Napoleon IV 1874-1905
 
View attachment 633529

My horrific attempt at making a map of Cinco de Mayo's Europe as of 1892. Note Alsace-Lorraine still being French, Luxembourg being part of Germany, the advancement of Russia into Central Asia, and the independence of Serbia, Romania and Montenegro but the OE still having a cohesive and substantive presence in the Balkans.

Map template originated here
What is that thing in Poland?
 
(Second Note: @Curtain Jerker , we finally got to the long-awaited part where the Liberals lose to the Tories that was foreshadowed! Did this come close enough to the electorate drinking lead paint? ;) )
Finally re-read and caught up to this timeline over the past few days. Wonderful wonderful job. I especially loved Hindenburg's "Whiff of Grapeshot" moment in dispelling the Putsch.

The British Liberals were doomed to failure when, after taking power in the 1870s, they immediately tried to pass some sort of half-assed land reform bill in Ireland that went far enough to piss off the English but didn't go far enough to actually solve any problems in Ireland. All they did was alienate Englishmen without getting the Irish on board. Once that moment of stupidity happened I sorta handwaved everything else Hartington and Co did. Kind of hard to get invested in a group of people when after wandering the wilderness for fifteen years they fail so spectacularly. Why bother getting invested in the first place?
 
"...the government's next body blow came with the revelation of the Panama scandal, of the vast fraud perpetrated on investors and the bribes doled out by the Canal Company and de Lesseps to grease the wheels for the stock issue of the now-bankrupt concern. The partially-dug canal in Colombia was unused, now little more than a mass grave for hundreds of coolies from China and Southeast Asia impressed for the backbreaking work; hundreds of legislators and dozens of junior ministers were found to have taken bribes. Napoleon was stunned by the way the scandal consumed French public opinion; caricatures in normally Tuileries-friendly press raged against the monarchist Assembly, threatening to bring down his pliant parliamentary majority. Thankfully, his inner circle had not touched the investments themselves, but for a country still reeling from the fraud at the Union Generale that had brought down the Bourse and with it the economy, the matter was another crack in the prestige of the Bonaparte regime. Boulanger aggressively pressed judges for maximum sentences; de Lesseps and Eiffel, another major member of the Canal Company, both received twenty year terms in prison, and the Eiffel Tower was renamed the "Tour Imperiale" from then on, in an effort to scrub his name from the landmark (since restored to its original name, of course). Street protests against politicians threatened to turn into protests against the Bonapartes; the early 1890s were perhaps the most fractious time of Napoleon IV's rule, and with it came a new surge of support for radicalism, republicanism, and in many cases, such as the pages of the newspaper Libre Parole, anti-Semitism, soon to be an aggressive force within French politics..."

- The Eaglet Takes Flight: The Reign of Napoleon IV 1874-1905
Once again, hints of a return to a French Republic (a French Kingdom is likely to retain any Imperial imagery) show up throughout the narrative. Now, with all these cracks forming, I am not sure if the Second Empire will even survive the Eaglet's untimely demise or deposition. Also, would some sort of alt-Dreyfus Affair happen here thanks to the rise of French anti-Semitism?
 
Finally re-read and caught up to this timeline over the past few days. Wonderful wonderful job. I especially loved Hindenburg's "Whiff of Grapeshot" moment in dispelling the Putsch.

The British Liberals were doomed to failure when, after taking power in the 1870s, they immediately tried to pass some sort of half-assed land reform bill in Ireland that went far enough to piss off the English but didn't go far enough to actually solve any problems in Ireland. All they did was alienate Englishmen without getting the Irish on board. Once that moment of stupidity happened I sorta handwaved everything else Hartington and Co did. Kind of hard to get invested in a group of people when after wandering the wilderness for fifteen years they fail so spectacularly. Why bother getting invested in the first place?

Thanks!

Yes indeed. The Liberals accomplished much under Hartington but they touched the third rail of alt!UK politics in the worst way. I envisioned him as a Moses figure to Chamberlain’s David; the man who led the Liberals out of the Gladstonian wilderness, but it’s Chamberlain who now at last gets the glory
 
Once again, hints of a return to a French Republic (a French Kingdom is likely to retain any Imperial imagery) show up throughout the narrative. Now, with all these cracks forming, I am not sure if the Second Empire will even survive the Eaglet's untimely demise or deposition. Also, would some sort of alt-Dreyfus Affair happen here thanks to the rise of French anti-Semitism?

The specifics of the Dreyfus Affair would be tough to replicate with the circumstances of Nap 4’s France so different but there’ll be some similar issues, for sure
 
On the other hand, my headcanon is that the reason Eiffel's name is restored to the tower is that evidence is later found that proves that the man was only involved in the engineering side of the failed canal and wasn't responsible for the gross incompetence in the management of the construction of the canal.
 
On the other hand, my headcanon is that the reason Eiffel's name is restored to the tower is that evidence is later found that proves that the man was only involved in the engineering side of the failed canal and wasn't responsible for the gross incompetence in the management of the construction of the canal.
That'll be part of it, also a future... shall we call it, less monarchical French state in a few decades trying to intentionally scrub Bonapartist imagery
 
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