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Well.... Mexico list of Problem will not go away anytime soon eh?

Also it is refreshing to see south American Power stand up against the US and almost win in the process.
 
So your first vacation when Covid ends isn’t going to be Cape Horn, I take it? ;)
Btw are you going to change Chiles future with this “short victorious war” lol
Like I see it they had the best American navy & best trained military from South America for several years, but they did nothing with it, diden’t work out any treaty’s with Brasil&Ecuador CP style to go after more territory in Argentina or Peru nothing at all....
 
Btw are you going to change Chiles future with this “short victorious war” lol
Like I see it they had the best American navy & best trained military from South America for several years, but they did nothing with it, diden’t work out any treaty’s with Brasil&Ecuador CP style to go after more territory in Argentina or Peru nothing at all....

They’ve already got the territory below the Deseado they wanted in Patagonia, so any conflict over the Beagle Channel with Argentina is basically gone. Could see them eventually making another push for Arica/Tacna (since the Saltpeter War was shorter/more in their favor earlier here, foreign powers intervene so they only go up to the Cabarones north of Iquique). Ecuador might want in on that too, get that chunk of northern Peru they’ve always coveted!

That said, the Civil War of 1891 is definitely being butterflied away and the Parliamentary Republic never rises, Balmaceda doesn’t become an autocrat then kill himself; no President will want to challenge the prestige of the Navy
 
They’ve already got the territory below the Deseado they wanted in Patagonia, so any conflict over the Beagle Channel with Argentina is basically gone. Could see them eventually making another push for Arica/Tacna (since the Saltpeter War was shorter/more in their favor earlier here, foreign powers intervene so they only go up to the Cabarones north of Iquique). Ecuador might want in on that too, get that chunk of northern Peru they’ve always coveted!

That said, the Civil War of 1891 is definitely being butterflied away and the Parliamentary Republic never rises, Balmaceda doesn’t become an autocrat then kill himself; no President will want to challenge the prestige of the Navy
Oh the butterflied civil war is a real game changer, at that time there was the whole idea to industrialize chile, but after the civil war that Parlament had other ideas, how to use that easy money chile was making with the saltpeter...that change will bring some interesting butterflies for the future alone.
 
Oh the butterflied civil war is a real game changer, at that time there was the whole idea to industrialize chile, but after the civil war that Parlament had other ideas, how to use that easy money chile was making with the saltpeter...that change will bring some interesting butterflies for the future alone.

The prestige of their decisive win over Peru/Bolivia and then fighting the US to a respectable draw (a victory for Chile in any sense of the word), plus their ties to Britain as a key component of the Three Capes Strategy, definitely opens the door to more investment, industrialization and immigration!

The one issue Chile really can’t avoid though is eventually somebody is going to blast a canal through Central America, and they won’t always be the only country in the world that happens to sail a protected cruiser (the window where Esmeralda was such a trumpcard in any naval dispute is vanishingly narrow, this war just happened to be fought within it). That’ll have knock on effects for their strategic value at the Horn and Valparaiso’s value as a port of call on the Pacific, of course.

Still; it’ll be a better-positioned Chile than OTL, that’s for sure
 
The prestige of their decisive win over Peru/Bolivia and then fighting the US to a respectable draw (a victory for Chile in any sense of the word), plus their ties to Britain as a key component of the Three Capes Strategy, definitely opens the door to more investment, industrialization and immigration!

The one issue Chile really can’t avoid though is eventually somebody is going to blast a canal through Central America, and they won’t always be the only country in the world that happens to sail a protected cruiser (the window where Esmeralda was such a trumpcard in any naval dispute is vanishingly narrow, this war just happened to be fought within it). That’ll have knock on effects for their strategic value at the Horn and Valparaiso’s value as a port of call on the Pacific, of course.

Still; it’ll be a better-positioned Chile than OTL, that’s for sure
Chile seems to have a great position through gaining most of OTL Santa Cruz Province in Argentina, a major producer of petroleum, gold, and other minerals. There are two major obstacles coming soon that would rapidly decrease Chile's economic stability, though - the eventual creation of a trans-American canal, which would make Cape Horn far less viable as a chokepoint; and the discovery of the OTL Haber process, a revolutionary chemical reaction that mass-produces ammonia, which makes nitrogen-based chemicals like gunpowder and fertilizer more widely available and also would render the saltpeter mines of Chile obsolete. However, the minerals in the territories that Chile gained in the Saltpeter War should keep their economy from completely going down the toilet, though the country would probably need to diversify to avoid ending up like OTL Argentina, a country that had a stellar economic run until the mid-20th century.
 
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Chile seems to have a great position through gaining most of OTL Santa Cruz Province in Argentina, a major producer of petroleum, gold, and other minerals. There are two major obstacles coming soon that would rapidly decrease Chile's economic stability, though - the eventual creation of a trans-American canal, which would make Cape Horn much far less viable as a chokepoint; and the discovery of the OTL Haber process, a revolutionary chemical reaction that mass-produces ammonia, which makes nitrogen-based chemicals like gunpowder and fertilizer more widely available and also would render the saltpeter mines of Chile obsolete. However, the minerals in the territories that Chile gained in the Saltpeter War should keep their economy from completely going down the toilet, though the country would probably need to diversify to avoid ending up like OTL Argentina, a country that had a stellar economic run until the mid-20th century.

That’s good to know that tip of the Cone is so resource rich! (And being on the Atlantic makes getting immigrant labor there easier, for that matter). The Haber process IMO is what could really jam things up, seeing how dependent Chile was on its Saltpeter monopoly. It’s definitely a country that could have a bad resource curse/Dutch disease if it’s not careful
 
That’s good to know that tip of the Cone is so resource rich! (And being on the Atlantic makes getting immigrant labor there easier, for that matter). The Haber process IMO is what could really jam things up, seeing how dependent Chile was on its Saltpeter monopoly. It’s definitely a country that could have a bad resource curse/Dutch disease if it’s not careful

In a way that could be the spark that makes them have a second Pacific War with Peru&Bolivia to go after more recourses to keep that industrial/commerce edge from going downhill, hell maybe even Argentina too if they have anything they want (more land to have cattle/a port higher up north in the Atlantic idk)

I still see the war against Peru&Bolivia more possible.
 
eventually somebody is going to blast a canal through Central America
Speaking of, since this poses such an existential threat to the Tehuantepec Railway, what are Max's plans to deal with its inevitable obsolescence? Why doesn't he get in on the canal game too, either convincing local and British investors to build a Central American Canal of their own or just blasting one on the path of the existing Railway itself?
 
Speaking of, since this poses such an existential threat to the Tehuantepec Railway, what are Max's plans to deal with its inevitable obsolescence? Why doesn't he get in on the canal game too, either convincing local and British investors to build a Central American Canal of their own or just blasting one on the path of the existing Railway itself?

So far his plan has been backing Barrios’ grandiose dreams of a Central American union with the hope he can use it as a catspaw to interfere with any Nicaraguan plans and hoping that Britain (the major investor in Mexico and the Railway in particular) meddles in France’s Panama project.

Like a lot of Max’s “ideas” it’s based on him punting the problem so he doesn’t have to deal with it now and trying to get other people to solve his issues for him.
 
One Party, One Nation: Canada's 19th Century Tory Dynasty
"...the Canadian Militia was unduly harsh, even in victory; Metis women and children were often shot or hung along with the men, their churches burned to the ground, and their lands sold quickly to the highest bidder. With the end of the fighting, and the Canadian Pacific Railroad's pathways from east to west once again clear, the future of the Canadian Priaries was secured - a future opened to primarily to Anglo settlement. [1] Tupper's refusal to pardon the leader of the Metis Rebellion [2], Louis Riel, was an additional outrage to Franco-Canadians, already appalled at the atrocities conducted against the mixed-race Metis nation in the Red River Valley. On the day of Riel's hanging, church bells rang out across Quebec, and a public vigil was held for him in Montreal, watched closely by Dominion Police; as Quebec had its own gendarmerie, the Police Provinciale. That the national police had been dispatched on orders from Ottawa to "keep the peace" during public demonstrations in Riel's honor was seen by Franco-Canadians for what it arguably was: an occupying force from the Anglo majority. Years of Protestant chauvinism in Ottawa, accelerated under Tupper, had chafed at Quebec, but it had largely been seen as directed at the more restive Irish, whom many Quebecois disliked as the newcomers refused to learn French and competed with them for control of Catholic lay institutions. Now, however, it seemed clear that the Orangemen in charge of Canada had turned their sights on their countrymen, who viewed their culture as unique to North America in an ancient way. Though it would take decades for the tensions to turn to bloodshed - Protestant Canada's attention would remain on "the Fenian" for quite some time longer - the rift between Anglo and Franco can be traced directly to the heavy-handedness of the Tupper government's response to Riel's last stand..."

- One Party, One Nation: Canada's 19th Century Tory Dynasty


[1] I believe I made it canon earlier that the CPR was finished earlier than OTL
[2] That it is called this and not the North-West Rebellion ITTL is not a coincidence
 
The Eaglet Takes Flight: The Reign of Napoleon IV 1874-1905
"...the "Triomphe Orientale" was an ostentatious celebration, stretching well past the Arc de Triomphe on the Champs d'Elysees and capping off a whole week of parties, balls, operas and even street fairs for the occasion. Flags draped every building in Paris and fireworks went off every night; estimates are blurry on how much of the national treasury was spent on the splendor. The outpouring of national pride led to a swell in patriotic fervor, best encapsulated in two pieces of music associated with the time - the opera "L'Empire Triomphant," which was finished in time for the fall celebrations and featured Admiral Courbet as its hero, with lavish sets, innovative lighting design and one of the most cutthroat auditions of all time as Europe's great singers scrambled for the opportunity to perform the hagiographic piece before the Young Eagle and his court in what promised to be a historic show; the other, "La Marche Imperiale," a new national anthem commissioned by the Emperor himself to replace "Partant pour la Syrie," which was associated largely with Napoleon IV's father. The new anthem was overwhelming, loud and imposing and grandiose [1], meant to intimidate and create an image and sound of power. An army band played the song on the parade route before the Foreign Legionnaires honored in the affair meant to call back to a Roman triumph, with War Minister Boulanger and Admiral Courbet the men of honor. Even decades later, children of the "golden generation" who were old enough to remember the Triomphe Orientale cite it as one of their treasured memories, an event so grand and such a fulcrum point in French history it was purely unforgettable, the high-water mark of the Second Empire, when Napoleon IV surpassed his father and took his seat at the right-hand of Napoleon I in French historic annals..."

- The Eaglet Takes Flight: The Reign of Napoleon IV 1874-1905


[1] Name chosen purposefully; in my head I like to imagine that the Second French Empire really does have "The Imperial March," yes, that one, as their national anthem. John Williams must just have been inspired by a cross-dimensional force in OTL ;)
 
wikipedia.en
Triomphe Orientale
The Triomphe Orientale, or Triumph of the Orient, was a celebration and military triumph in October 1885 to celebrate the victory of the Tonkin Expeditionary Corps and Far East Squadron over the Chinese in the recently concluded Sino-French War, and to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Tientsin that greatly expanded French holdings in the Far East. The Triomphe Orientale is often cited as one of the three major events in Paris that denote "La Decade d'Or," the French "golden decade" that began with the marriage of Emperor Napoleon IV and Empress Marie de Pilar in 1879 and concluded with the Exposition Universalle in 1889, with La Triomphe being the middle and high point of the decade when the Second French Empire is widely viewed as being at its global zenith in terms of military might, economic prosperity and cultural prestige. Major impacts of the Triomphe include the Imperial anthem, La Marche Imperiale which is still used by French monarchists today (see: Monarchists in France#symbols); the dedication of the Place de l'Empire at the former Place du Chateau d'Eau, along with the grand 175-foot tall Obelisc Orientale at its center; and the Golden Eagle monument on the Esplanade des Invalides.
 
Old Bull: Francisco Serrano and Modern Spain
"...1885's October elections would be a repeat of 1880's: a reduction in the National Liberals' seat share, to the point that they had a narrow majority of three seats, but still more than the Radicals and Conservatives - the next two largest parties, respectively - combined. Other minor parties, such as a much-maligned Carlist rump that saw some success in Vizcaya, the Progressive Democrats who were alleged to be republicans, and the "cantonalist" party that outpaced even the Radicals and enjoyed support in poor Andalusia, made up the rest.

Serrano, however, was dismayed that the Spanish people had not delivered him a stronger mandate with the economy healthy, new schools, roads and railroads being built, peaceful relations between not only Spain and other countries but also between church and state and Madrid and the provinces - even restive Cuba and Vizcaya had enjoyed peace for well over a decade now. Shortly after the election, the Duke de la Torre met privately with Leopoldo to let him know that he planned to resign once he could identify a proper successor, with his choices effectively down to Martos and Sagasta [1], his two most reliable ministers who were also fierce rivals with one another, as the men had a deep personal enmity in addition to their longstanding lobbying to follow in the Old Bull's footsteps. Leopoldo, well aware of the Martos-Sagasta feud, was tempted to name the retired Juan Prim to a caretaker government, but when this suggestion was floated Serrano politely rebuffed the sovereign; the choice had to be someone with support in the Cortes, Serrano opined, rather than someone imposed upon the Cortes by the King. With memories of the Berlin Insult still fresh, and the Glorious Revolution less than a generation past, a neutral and figurehead monarchy was a necessity for Spain's hard-won peace, in the view of not just Serrano but many other National Liberals. At any rate, Prim was also ennobled; Serrano's preference for either Martos or Sagasta rested largely on that they did not hold titles or peerages.

The temperature was being taken within the Cortes for Serrano's potential retirement when the Old Bull died in his sleep on November 25 [2], 1885, shocking Spain as the dominant political figure of the last two decades had passed. The man who had played roles under Marshal O'Donnell and was that strongman's clear successor, a man who had played a key role in the Glorious Revolution, steered the democratic Leopoldo onto the throne after the overthrow of the autocratic Bourbons, who had helped see the country through wars with both the insurgencies of the Carlists and the Caribbean rebels as well as fending off the Confederate invasion of Cuba [3], who had deftly warded off a near-war with France over a royal faux pas, and who had set Spain on a path of stability and moderate liberalism as opposed to the proto-integralist regimes in France and Austria or the truly radical Italy, was gone.

Perhaps more importantly, in a true twist of fate, was the passing on the same day of Infante Alfonso in Paris, which shocked the Spanish public perhaps just as much. The Bourbon pretender had died childless, throwing the future of the line into question. It was a relief to Leopoldo, who reportedly was unsure whether he should privately open a bottle of fine brandy to toast Alfonso's death while still mourning Serrano until his sons suggested they all drink to both the end of the most legitimate threat to the Hohenzollern hold on Madrid as well as the legacy of the Old Bull. The Bourbonists in Spain were left reeling; Isabella's eldest daughter, Infanta Isabel, effectively became heiress presumptive as the pretending Princess Asturias, but Isabel was without issue and her husband had long since committed suicide. Canovas, a known sympathizer of the old ruling house to the point that he was sometimes accused of Carlist sympathies, was apparently despondent that there would be no Bourbon Restoration, and the death of Alfonso led to the defection of many Conservatives over the next few years. Carlists saw this as their opportunity - with no male heir to the Isabelline line, they proclaimed themselves the true heirs of the House of Bourbon against the "vulgar Germans" on the Spanish throne, but such declarations were made from the safety of France and Austria.

Nevertheless, the dual deaths upended Spanish politics. Serrano was given a state funeral at the Cathedral of Toledo [4] and buried in his family's newly-built mausoleum in Cadiz, with thousands of onlookers watching his funeral train first from Madrid to Toledo, then on to its final resting place. With fears of Bourbonism receding within El Escorial, Leopoldo opted to tap Martos as the next Prime Minister - a move he would later acknowledge was a colossal blunder - to appeal to the
primistas, or left wing of the National Liberals, who preferred Martos to the serranista Sagasta, hoping to head off the appeal of the Radicals, many of whom were openly antimonarchist rather than merely anti-Hohenzollern, with a more progressive government. In appointing Martos rather than the more ideologically similar Sagasta, the Old Bull's legacy was not directly continued; rather, it would mark the beginning of five years where the National Liberals were so riven by infighting that the party nearly broke in two..."

- Old Bull: Francisco Serrano and Modern Spain


[1] Cristino Martos and Praxedes Mateo Sagasta, that is
[2] Day after my birthday, incidentally (not in 1885 of course!)
[3] I'd almost forgotten this debacle happened and that it killed off Nathan B. Forrest
[4] If you're ever in Spain, Toledo is a highlight worth seeing

(And so along with Bazaine we say goodbye to another major figure of the early chunk of this TL. Prim, 71 at this point, will probably die soon enough, but I doubt he'll get his own chapter. Maybe a Wikipedia entry).
 
The Raj
"...Burma thus found itself being largely overrun by late November as the Third Anglo-Burmese War concluded rapidly. Developmental concerns were of course a piece of the puzzle for why the war broke out, but there were of course two other developments - the need for an expanded Raj with the French victories in China earlier in the year, with French encroachment in Burma viewed as unacceptable in London, as well as the political ambitions of Lord Randolph Churchill, the Colonial Secretary who presented a Burma annexed to India as a "Christmas gift" for Queen Victoria [1]. Nevertheless, 1885's conclusion was important in the history of India not just for the war that attached the culturally divergent Burma to the Raj, but for an even more important development - the foundation of the Congress Party in Bombay. This early permutation of Congress was not a political party but as a civic organization indeed formed by a Briton of the Civil Service, Allen Hume, who saw the "Indian National Union" as a platform for dialogue between the India Office and educated Indians taking a greater stake in the country's government organizations. The elite Indians who joined the proto-Congress had little in common with the Indian masses, of course, and early on it served as little more than a vehicle for their own personal and class ambitions..."

- The Raj


[1] This part is 100% true, alt-Sino-French War is of course not
 
Titan: The Life and Presidency of James G. Blaine
"...Britain as arbitrator sped the negotiations of what would eventually be the Treaty of Acapulco, signed in neutral Mexico by John Hay and his Chilean counterpart, Aníbal Zañartu. The treaty effectively imposed a status quo ante, leading many in the American public, her appetite whetted for a punitive war against the "republic of pirates," to wonder what the war had been for. The United States conceded only one point - that the 1843 treaty with Colombia did not define "defending Colombian neutrality" as including any annexation of Colombian territory, and reaffirmed the United States' signature at the Pan-American Conference of a proclamation foregoing any "territory taken by conquest." (It should be pointed out that Chile never signed this proclamation, on the heels of the Saltpeter War). In return, Chile recognized America's diplomatic responsibilities to Colombia, and agreed to pay a small indemnity, financed with low-interest British loans, to repay the costs of sunk or damaged American warships. It also agreed to pay a much larger indemnity for the merchant marine vessels sunk or damaged during the war, not with gold payments to the Treasury but via an innovative mechanism suggested by Hay at arbitration - a trust company that would invest in Chile without having to pay the export tax on saltpeter or gold, for a period of seven years or until the assessed damages on the merchant marine had been fully paid, at which time it would pay a still-reduced duty for a further seven years. This trust was invented after Chile's refusal to pay the full cost of the indemnity in what they saw as a war they had fought to a draw fairly on the seas, and seen as a way to save face for both sides. That the complicated arrangement was not as easy to demagogue against by opponents of either government was of course a major boon.

And so, the privately held Pacific American Trust Company - to be known in future years as PATCO - was formed in San Francisco, to pay out reparations to damaged shipping companies. Within two years it was the largest investor in Chilean mining operations beyond major British banks; after the Panic of 1890 struck the City of London's great banks, it was by far the largest. The indemnities were paid off within three years rather than seven as the Chilean saltpeter boom swelled both Chile's treasury and Pacific American's ledgers; with the unforeseen extra earnings, the trust invested in trans-Pacific and Latin American shipping companies, banks, mining firms both in North and South America (and, in 1898, China), as well as railroad holdings and shipbuilding concerns. Pacific American was a fundamentally political beast; despite its ballooning wealth even during the early 1890s depression, it would not go public until 1901, and among its stakeholders it included President Blaine, Secretary of State Hay (who's friend, explorer and geologist Clarence King, sat on its board), former President Lincoln (who's well-heeled Chicago and Springfield law firm acted as counsel to the trust), and to generate support from Democrats, California Senator and mining baron George Hearst, who pushed to have his young son William Randolph Hearst given a position at the company's San Francisco headquarters in 1887 when he finished his collegiate studies..."

- Titan: The Life and Presidency of James G. Blaine
 
The Hamidian Era: The Ottoman Empire 1876-1918
"...the death of Muhammad Ahmad, the Mahdi, marked the breakthrough against the Mahdists that the Ottoman forces needed, winning critical victories over the Sudanese rebels into early 1886 and mostly suppressing the dwindling revolts by the decade's end. The war exposed uneasy realities to the Porte; that their African holdings were just as much a colonial foothold as those of the Europeans, as African Muslims viewed Arabs, let alone Turks, as unfriendly interlopers after centuries of the slave trade (one that quietly continued even under Abdulhamid). Pushing further into North Africa - the Ottoman's furthest outpost would be at Lake Chad, from where they could still project an economic and cultural sphere of influence even as neighboring territories were gradually snapped up by Europeans in the 1890s and 1900s - the Saharan component of the Ottoman Empire was a network of oasis garrisons among pastoralists, a much smaller area in its importance to Istanbul than would be surmised from the vast swatch of the continent it took up on a map. The logistical difficulties exposed in the Mahdist War were hard to solve; the consortiums of British and French banks that competed for influence in Istanbul, Damascus and Cairo did not have limitless resources even though it often seemed so and had other lucrative parts of the world to pursue investments as well. Building a railroad in Palestine was hard enough; building ones south of Cairo or west of Alexandria was nearly impossible, what with development most sorely needed in the restive Balkan industrial heartland. So the North African vilayets and beyliks would remain either backwaters or European-dominated borderlands outside of the Nile Delta, colonial outposts tied to the Porte only by the crescent moon flag flying above the isolated fortresses..."

- The Hamidian Era: The Ottoman Empire 1876-1918
 
The Grand Consensus: The Longstreet Machine, Reconciliation and the Dawn of the 20th Century in Dixie
"...there was no real campaign beyond the convention in Savannah, where Lamar was chosen nearly-unanimously in what would better be described as a coronation, having received an enthusiastic endorsement in the weeks prior by Longstreet. The real battle was for the mostly sinecure office of Vice President, where Lamar lobbied for ambitious Representative Roger Q. Mills of Texas to be appointed, in part to remove a thorn in the side of Speaker Carlisle and to mollify restive Texans, always the most easily frustrated state in the Confederacy. From there, it was a foregone conclusion that Lamar would be the next President; even a spirited personalist campaign by William Mahone of Virginia earned him no electoral votes and barely 20% of the votes cast nationally, so rapidly had the Democrats penetrated every sphere of Dixie society. It would prove the first truly uncontroversial election in Confederate history; unlike the partisan paramilitary violence that marred prior contests, to say nothing of the stunning Supreme Court intervention in 1873 against Breckinridge, there was no violence to speak of, and the election instead had a party atmosphere as people publicly cast their votes. The inauguration of Lamar the following February would mark the first time that the outgoing President rode to the Capitol steps alongside his successor to effect the public transfer of power; Davis had of course not attended Forrest's inauguration due to ill health, while Breckinridge and Harris had both refused to participate in the inaugural parades. Longstreet standing beside Lamar as his loyal former Secretary of State took the oath of office was thus a major step in cementing not just the Grand Consensus - which arguably reached its high water mark in the Lamar Presidency - but also the dominance of the Democratic Party as a cultural and social force, in which peace and order was prioritized, and of peaceful democracy, illiberal and imperfect as it still was.

Longstreet was due to return to his plantation in Gainesville, Georgia in the days following his leaving office when he received word that Stonewall Jackson had passed away of pneumonia in Lexington the night of the inauguration, aged 62, and that he had been asked to deliver the eulogy as well as one of Jackson's favorite sermons. The Society of Confederate Veterans event in Lexington was a mirror of the same banquet preceding Robert Lee's funeral in the same city a decade and a half before; an event which in many ways was seen as launching Longstreet's career (despite having already run for President once) as the antithesis of the thuggish Klan and Tennessee Clique, so would a similar banquet mark a bookend to his leaving elective office. In the same chapel where Lee had been buried, Longstreet famously declared, "And so us old soldiers ride off into the night one by one, but memories of the men who served beside, a flame of honor in the dark, will burn eternally here in our holy and beloved Dixie."

From Gainesville, Longstreet would certainly not have an inactive retirement; he remained active in the cotton trade via several Canal Street brokerages that he participated in, eventually investing in the Central American fruit businesses that emerged in 1890s New Orleans [1]
, and he would serve again as President of the Society of Confederate Veterans, making it a crucial power bloc within the Democratic Party from which he could hold influence, which he did in later years in a variety of internecine struggles within the Party between his more reformist faction and the "Bourbons" aligned against him. For his Presidency coinciding with a previously unseen period of internal stability and prosperity after the chaotic 1870s, chaos which after the Cuban Expedition and the electoral controversy of 1873 could have plunged the nation into civil war, Longstreet is still generally ranked by historians as the Confederacy's best President..."

- The Grand Consensus: The Longstreet Machine, Reconciliation and the Dawn of the 20th Century in Dixie


[1] If you thought United Fruit was bad IOTL... hoo boy
 
Seymour: Portrait of a Forgotten President
"...following the death of Hendricks on November 25, 1885 [1], Seymour made his last public appearance at the funeral in Indianapolis, where he was surprised to see Lincoln in attendance as well. The affable old Illinoisan, adroit, witty and sharp as ever at a young 76, remarked to Seymour that his immediate successor looked much paler and thinner than he had nine months earlier at Blaine's second inaugural; never in robust health, Seymour had in fact been declining for nearly a decade, not bothering to campaign in 1884 for what he correctly predicted would be a losing ticket despite being good friends with Bayard. Upon returning to New York, Mary fell ill in January, and Seymour's health continued to worsen badly. In his last hours, he wrote a number of letters to old friends and rivals that were later transcribed before their mailing out so they could be shared in his posthumous memoirs; Horatio Seymour, the 17th President of the United States, passed on the morning of February 12, 1886, aged 75.

His own funeral wound up being much more attended than that of Hendricks, what with his deep ties to New York's political establishment. Former President Lincoln honored him with a eulogy, which he had not done in Indianapolis two months prior, as did fellow New Yorker, former President Hoffman. Those who spoke of Seymour spoke of a man who saw the Union through the difficult postwar depression, the man who secured Alaska and the Virgin Islands for the country, and who acted honorably in office, never once taking a "penny from the public purse," what was understood as a swipe against the Liberals by the perpetually-embittered Hoffman [2]. Less mentioned was his veto of the Navy Act or his frequent sparring with the political opposition, or his sympathies towards the South and contempt for "the Negro," but such considerations would color impressions of the man deep into the 21st century, when he gradually faded from view, although perhaps less so than Hoffman or Hendricks did in the gallery of anonymous Presidents who passed through the White House between Jackson and Blaine. Of all of them, Seymour may in fact have been the most impactful behind only Chase..."

- Seymour: Portrait of a Forgotten President


[1] There must have been something in the air that day, damn. Hendricks, Serrano AND Infante Alfonso!
[2] I mean seriously, a party largely mobilizes against the corruption of your associates back in New York despite you being personally clean, ends your political career when you're in your 40s and then engages in the kinds of shenanigans that Blaine and Hay have been up to? I'd be cranky too!
 
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