When it comes to Weather I think its hard to butterfly. Yes its 50 years, but the knockon effects are hard to judge in their entirety.
Frankly these specific storms may not happen, It could just be one hurricane for 1916., it could now be seven hurricanes....or hell, it could be butterflied to be a year before, or a year after 1916.

Weather is very hard to judge. although @DanMcCollum says it better below

Didnt we have a discussion about President Robert Redford 1989-1997?
I swear that was this thread....
Yes, it was this thread.
Wait what? Robert Redford will be President during the 90s in the Cinco de Mayo TL?😱 HELL YEAH. As a fan of the Watchmen comic I cannot wait to see Redford be TTL's equivalent of the "Hollywood actor in the White house" that Reagan was in OTL. Even though it's still a long way off till the 90s in this TL sign me up!:)👍
 
Alliance Against America: Inside the Bloc Sud
"...sophisticated, developing and modernizing societies; nonetheless, it was the Confederacy that was at the lynchpin of the alliance. Without it as a shield, Brazil would have never dared act unilaterally on her ambitions in her periphery; without it as the tip of the spear, Mexico would have been unlikely to make its substantial economic disagreements with the United States a cause for war.

Postwar, the Confederacy's military prowess was retroactively downplayed, but it was a serious emerging power even if it was not an exact peer to the United States. By the autumn of 1913, it had six battleships, four of them dreadnoughts with a fifth to be delivered late the following year, as well as thirteen cruisers - a total naval tonnage that would have been respectable for a second-tier European power. Each of its states could mobilize a state militia of between fifteen to twenty-five thousand men on quick demand and by late November it would have put an army of over half a million men into the field and it had a robust armaments sector particularly well-developed in the manufacture of artillery shells. It had an industrial density similar to that of Italy and despite its considerable societal inequalities a rapidly rising per capita income on par with that of Austria or Belgium. After two deep, long-lasting agricultural depressions in the 1870s and 1890s that had caused mass dislocation but also substantial economic reforms and innovations, it was one of the fastest growing economies in the Western Hemisphere and had finally begun to seriously attract levels of immigrants comparable to Canada or Mexico, though still not at the mass pace of its northern cousin or the countries of the Southern Cone. Its white population had an above-average literacy rate, particularly women, and was urbanizing rapidly. It was mostly in comparison to the trio of great European powers - Britain, France and Germany - and the United States that it can be considered anything other than a rising, ambitious state.

Its membership in the Bloc Sud was what made all that followed possible; it is also, not coincidentally, what gave the Confederate States leadership, from the civilian officialdom starting with President Ellison "Cotton Ed" Smith as well as the military hierarchy embodied in the cool and collected General Hugh Scott, Commander-in-Chief of the Army Staff Office, such confidence in the opening salvos of the war. One can also see in contemporary military planning documents as well as reactive responses to the conflict just how seriously the United States took its opponent, a begrudging respect for its capabilities that speaks to the remarkably harsh postwar settlement imposed upon Richmond, particularly on its military capabilities.

What the Confederacy showed off on September 9th was an impressive display of strategic creativity and operational art that would be studied by war gamers and staff colleges for decades to come; as the German General Edwin von Rommel would once comment in his book on the war (Rommel served as a military observer in the Eastern Theater embedded with the United States), "The Confederate tactical prowess was combined with a well-practiced, disciplined plan executed across a vast front line within a half hour, timed with clockwork precision to confuse and overwhelm their opponent with infantry, artillery, aerial scouting and naval assets simultaneously." In modern terms the operation would be termed as combined arms warfare, but there was no such language for it then. What language existed to describe the Confederate attack on the morning of September 9th was merely one of awe.

At 5:00 AM, the order to move to attack positions was received by Confederate soldiers both near its staging ground outside of Martinsburg as well as the division south of Alexandria City and the II Atlantic Squadron that had left Norfolk on Sunday evening and was now anchored in the Pocomoke Sound, just south of the international border on the Delmarva Peninsula. At 5:30, a second telegraphed coded message was broadcast out to all soldiers - "HHH. HHH. HHH." For close to ten years, it had been the most feared and anticipated signal in the Confederate military: the codeword to commence an attack on the United States.

In later years, it became vogue in the United States to criticize if not condemn the behavior of the Maryland National Guard during the second week of September, and indeed its seeming habit of melting before the enemy at the slightest contact did it no favors in the eyes of the public or policymakers. Nonetheless, it had a major disadvantage of being a force of barely twenty thousand men, many whom had been Guardsmen for close to twenty years, defending a small, still oft-agricultural state across a variety of theaters. The largest barracks of the Maryland Guard was in Hagerstown, directly across the Potomac from the Confederate line of attack and behind aging but stout defenses designed to prevent another crossing such as that of 1862. The main thrust of the Confederate attack was aimed here, firing two divisions up the Monocacy Valley to cut the east-west rail, telegraph and canal infrastructure to Washington. [1] The riverfront defenses were undermanned and were quickly overwhelmed under artillery fire and the attack occurring effectively at dawn; by nine in the morning, Confederate forces had secured their bridgeheads and were marching to meet Maryland forces at Hagerstown.

The second thrust of the attack was to seize more crossings of the Potomac, and these met even less opposition. Near the site of the 1862 Battle of Sharpsburg that ended inconclusively, a cavalry regiment forded the river at a shallow point and seized the railroad bridge nearby, allowing a brigade across; downriver at Harpers Ferry, a full division attacked across the river, splitting in half to secure a defensive perimeter five miles to the north in the highlands ridge of South Mountain while the other contingent marched along the river to secure bridgeheads on the east side of the highlands (two more divisions would be formed by the 11th in Leesburg to be brought across there) and seize the strategic railyards at Brunswick. The Maryland National Guard had a second, smaller barracks at Frederick and foolishly split these forces in half; they were twice repelled by Confederate defenders as they attempted to respond to reports of Confederates everywhere and move towards Washington, where federal forces were overwhelmed in artillery bombardment, and reinforce a small National Guard garrison in Baltimore as its harbor erupted in fire and explosions early that morning. By striking out in two prongs while using heavy fire against the two largest population centers in the region - including the critical capital - the Confederates were able to achieve all their day one objectives by early afternoon and regroup for the second wave of reinforcements to cross on the morning of the 10th as mobilization continued apace. The Battle of the Monocacy, as the engagements became known, were over within a day and were decisive Confederate victories, with hundreds of National Guardsmen captured and the majority of them fleeing in hurried retreat..."

- Alliance Against America: Inside the Bloc Sud

[1] The B&O railroad runs north of the Potomac until West Virginia, as I'm sure you can all imagine
 
Wait what? Robert Redford will be President during the 90s in the Cinco de Mayo TL?😱 HELL YEAH. As a fan of the Watchmen comic I cannot wait to see Redford be TTL's equivalent of the "Hollywood actor in the White house" that Reagan was in OTL. Even though it's still a long way off till the 90s in this TL sign me up!:)👍
I try not to reference other works of art too much but this one I couldn't resist!
 
Hell at Sea: The Naval Campaigns of the Great American War
"...the II Atlantic Squadron was led by the dreadnought CSS Alabama as well as the CSS Texas, an old pre-dreadnought battleship nicknamed "Old Hoodoo" for its curious cases of strange, often poor luck, supported by three of the Confederacy's thirteen armored cruisers - Richmond, New Orleans, and Pensacola, the lead vessel of its newest class - the aging protected cruisers Knoxville and Macon, four destroyers and five surface torpedo boats. In addition, two experimental submarines were dispatched as part of the escort; the Confederacy had a rudimentary submarine warfare doctrine and only six of the vessels in total, but Baltimore Harbor was expected to be an outstanding proving ground for these vessels. Separate from the II Squadron, two old, unprotected cruisers from the 1890s long earmarked to be scrapped or mothballed were sent out ahead of the escort crew by their skeleton crews and followed by a small unarmed vessel to the east, bearing for the mouth of the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal. The operation they were meant for was carried out soon after the assault on Baltimore began - the two old cruisers were maneuvered into the mouth of the canal, turned so as to block its passage, and then scuttled. The crews were picked up by the unarmed surface ship and steamed back to Pocomoke Sound immediately.

The attack on Baltimore Harbor commenced at approximately 8:07 AM on September 9th, 1913. Baltimore was the sixth-largest city in the United States and was, after New York and Philadelphia, the East Coast's third-busiest port. Lying at the point where the Patapsco entered the Chesapeake and not far south of the mouth of the Susquehanna into the same bay, it was at the head of an outstanding natural harbor with an outer and inner segment delineated by various headlands. Even before tensions with the Confederacy had risen, its defenses had been a key concern for US military planners; Fort McHenry on Locust Point in the Inner Harbor adjacent to the main port had been made famous in the War of 1812, but it had been supplemented and rendered nearly obsolete by a network of defenses guarding the Outer Harbor. Furthest out sat Fort Howard on the north of the Patapsco and Fort Smallwood on the south; two miles further in was Fort Armistead on a promontory on the south, and the small pillbox fortification of Fort Carroll with its three barbette guns smack dab in the center of the river on an artificial island. Together, these four forts were designed to prevent a hostile attack on the harbor itself, and they were well-armed and properly staffed by the US Army Harbor Defense Command on the morning of the attack. In the port itself, at anchor, was the Third Division of the Atlantic Fleet under Admiral Frank Fletcher; the Third Division contained the dreadnought battleship Rhode Island (BB-13) as well as the pre-dreadnoughts Minnesota (BB-7) and Kansas (BB-10), and the armored cruisers Seattle (ACR-10, the lead ship of its class, the last separate armored cruiser class of the US Navy before it was combined with the "heavy cruiser" designation in 1914), Brooklyn (ACR-3), and the protected cruisers St. Louis (C-20) and Springfield (C-22), along with two destroyers and two torpedo boats.

The improvements meant to defend against dreadnought big guns had not yet been made to the coastal defenses of Baltimore Harbor, and the Alabama quickly pounded Fort Howard on the north bank into submission as the three armored cruisers passed behind it to open fire upon Fort Carroll. The Texas sustained two direct hits that nearly crippled the boat from Fort Armistead but was able to suppress its fire long enough for Fort Carroll's guns to be pounded into oblivion during the exchange of fire, opening up an avenue into the harbor. The key to the battle, of course, was the use of torpedo boats and submarines to pass behind the larger vessels into the Inner Harbor itself to wreak havoc, which they did with gusto; as the Third Division scrambled to deploy out of its docks (it had been put on alert but not been put to sea yet; Navy plans had called for dispatching it towards Norfolk on the 11th as Congress debated a declaration of war), torpedoes hummed through the water, striking vessels below the waterline. The Seattle's fuel quarters and magazine were struck dead-on, detonating the ship in a massive fireball at its quay and severely damaging other harbor facilities; two other magazines and coal depots were struck by strafing fire from the Alabama with its long range guns, causing a massive fire to break out in the port. The St. Louis was hit by two torpedoes to its port and it listed, forcing its abandonment; the Springfield was hit square-on by a shell that punctured its armor and it sank after pulling out of dock.

The three battleships had sufficient firepower to ward off the Confederate vessels and indeed sank two torpedo boats, but suffered critical damage nonetheless. The new Rhode Island took a critical strike to its propellers and rudder, rendering it inoperable; the Kansas had one of its big guns blasted clean off the deck and a hole punched through its armor just above the waterline. Only the Minnesota escaped relatively unscathed, fighting its way past the enemy and out of the harbor to relative safety, only to discover that its escape route to the Delaware River had been closed off. It was instead sailed into the mouth of the Susquehanna, where it would lie in wait as a floating artillery barge.

In all, the Battle of Baltimore Harbor lasted approximately four hours and was a staggering, decisive defeat for the United States. Three cruisers had been sunk and another captured; two battleships, including a prized dreadnought, had been rendered inoperable at dock. The port facilities at Baltimore were destroyed, massive amounts of damage had been done to the city itself, and three of its harbor fortifications had been devastated. Not only that, but news throughout the day suggested massive Confederate advances in western Maryland, and news of a similarly lethal bombardment of Washington reached the city as the Confederate squadron - which lost only one destroyer and two torpedo boats in the whole ordeal, though Texas was returned to Norfolk for repairs - rained hellfire upon a city of over half a million souls. Pandemonium broke out in the streets; in addition to the one thousand US sailors killed in the attack, nearly three hundred civilians lost their lives on September 9th, close to a third of them from the chaotic stampede to flee the southern part of the city that broke out..."

- Hell at Sea: The Naval Campaigns of the Great American War
 
Smh. I was think that.
Maybe he does'nt take the nickname?
Depending on where Vince McMahon, Sr. ends up in the 1940s, the WWE may get butterflied away entirely (Vinny Mac and Linda are both North Carolina-born and raised, so at the very least Mrs. Haitch probably won't be around).
 
Out of curiosity, when the Great American War ends in 2.5-3 or so years, between the USA, CSA, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Chile, what sort of overall casualties could we be seeing.? The total population of all the participants is around 150-160 million, and during OTL WW1 the various major powers had fatalities equivalent to 2-4% of their population, so I guess the total fatalities could be somewhere around 3-6 million depending on the length and severity of the fighting.
 
Depending on where Vince McMahon, Sr. ends up in the 1940s, the WWE may get butterflied away entirely (Vinny Mac and Linda are both North Carolina-born and raised, so at the very least Mrs. Haitch probably won't be around).
Could see WWE style stuff be a limited CSA thing, sort of like how luchadores aren’t much of a draw outside of Mexico
Out of curiosity, when the Great American War ends in 2.5-3 or so years, between the USA, CSA, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Chile, what sort of overall casualties could we be seeing.? The total population of all the participants is around 150-160 million, and during OTL WW1 the various major powers had fatalities equivalent to 2-4% of their population, so I guess the total fatalities could be somewhere around 3-6 million depending on the length and severity of the fighting.
There’ll be some wide variants across regions and fronts, but something in that 2-3% range sounds about right to me. Some countries get off much lighter than others
 
I'm guessing the CSA is on the worse off end of the scale:happyblush?
Probably worst of all combatants in percentages and probably in raw numbers too
What is the status of airpower in the Confederacy and the Union?
Good q. US is of course an early innovator in air power and having an air corps for its army, and the CSA has some French planes lying around but definitely quite a step behind the US. Doctrine for both sides, with only some minor use of planes in the Chinese Civil War as an example to draw from, is that planes are primarily a better scouting tool than observation balloons
 
And, I have to say - I never thought I'd run into someone with a stronger stance on butterfly effect than me! (And I don't mean that as a diss or jab at all! I'm one of those "No one born 9 months after the POD" sorts; though when we get into complicated systems like the weather, its a bit too above my head )
German General Edwin von Rommel
I was not expecting Irving Morrell to appear. :p :p

@DanMcCollum Here is another one.
 
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