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This make a precedent, just as i thought, tories might not survive the XIXth Century

Who's going to stop them? With the franchise as limited as it is ITTL combined with the complete incompetency shown by the Liberals why would the Tories ever be stopped? So there are rioters - so what? They'll be hanged and portrayed by a sympathetic press as looters and thugs and people will go about their day.

As long as the Tories decide who gets to vote there's no way they'll be systematically threatened because anyone that would vote them out of power can't do it.
 
Who's going to stop them? With the franchise as limited as it is ITTL combined with the complete incompetency shown by the Liberals why would the Tories ever be stopped? So there are rioters - so what? They'll be hanged and portrayed by a sympathetic press as looters and thugs and people will go about their day.

As long as the Tories decide who gets to vote there's no way they'll be systematically threatened because anyone that would vote them out of power can't do it.

Two words: French Revolution.
 
Two words: French Revolution.

Maybe! The electoral process in Britain is clearly broken if a Tory government can retain a fake majority in the middle of a depression. As long as uber-reactionaries like Salisbury and Carnarvon are running the show (Walpole clearly is in way over his head, just like Stanley was before him) then there's no real chance for the Tories to try an end-around and co-opt the rioter's message and agree to increased suffrage/workers rights a la Bismarck in Germany OTL.

There's also the question of the Liberal Party. To say they are inept is underselling it drastically. They managed to lose an election in the middle of a depression to a Tory party that is more or less universally hated by everyone that isn't a rich aristocrat. Yes, I understand the deck is stacked against them with no Reform Act but still - when I said this timeline's Tory's are wanked to all hell this is exactly what I meant. Three straight Tory PMs despite the Tories essentially driving the country into the ditch, yet they keep winning. Winning by less, sure, but to quote the great philosopher Dominic Toretto: "It don't matter if you win by an inch or a mile. Winning's winning."
 
Youth and Vigor: The Presidency of John T. Hoffman
"...the Democrats of course were sluiced through with feuds and contradictions themselves. They were simultaneously the party of immigrants, particularly the Irish, in big cities, while also of farmers in the grand open West and small-government conservatives who despised the postbellum expansion of federal powers. Hoffman was a reformist, while others in his party were reactionaries, most prominently Senator George Pendleton of Ohio. This fractious state of affairs boiled up over the course of the young President's first year as the Silver Coinage Act was debated - inflationists such as Pendleton, the leader of the radical wing of the party, wanted to denominate "free silver" at a ratio of 16-1 to gold. Others, such as Thomas Bayard of Delaware, wanted to keep the gold standard much like most Republicans and Liberals. The increasingly acrimonious debate swirled around Hoffman's modest compromise of minting silver dollars, but no denomination higher than one dollar, and only minting one million dollars per year for five years, at a rate of 4-1 with gold. Placing a five-year expiry on the act would allow a reassessment of the money supply in a future Congress and, if needed, allow further expansion of silver coinage at that time.

Hoffman's efforts to reform the Indian Office, a hotbed of corruption and tales of abuse on reservations under Chase, ran headlong into the Sioux raids on settlers in the Black Hills. Despite placing General Winfield Scott Hancock in charge of the US Army's native clearances to attempt to pursue a different course than the vicious brutality enacted under his predecessor William T. Sherman [1], the settlers in the West continued to encroach on Native land and Colonel George Custer had emerged as a folk hero for his bitter campaigns against "the red menace." Not even Hancock could put off the war.

But the biggest issue for Hoffman's young Presidency would be an event in his native New York, when the July 12th Orange parade instigated a massive, ugly riot that required the National Guard to be called into the city and quell a whole four days of looting and mayhem that left 51 people dead..."

- Youth and Vigor: The Presidency of John T. Hoffman

[1]
Infamous for his attacks on Indians in the postbellum era
 
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Carlismo: A History of Spanish Revolution and Reaction
"...Serrano personally directed much of the summer campaign in Catalonia, and the key victory would occur in early July at Torello, where he not only routed a substantial Carlist force with aggressive artillery fire and a bold cavalry sweep that dashed the enemy left flank, but also killed Don Alfonso, the pretender's younger and more militarily competent brother, with an errant cannon shot. Serrano would appoint himself as Captain-General of Barcelona in the immediate aftermath of the battle and dispatched Weyler south to clear out Carlist forces to the north of Valencia. In the chaos of the collapse of the second and more successful uprising, Don Carlos fled back into France via Andorra, leaving scattered war bands behind. Only the ruthlessly aggressive partisans of the "Mad Priest," Manuel Santa Cruz, active in Vizcaya and western Navarre, remained a substantial threat by summer's end.

With the Carlist threat mostly dispatched, the question then turned to nation building by Leopold and his government. It would not be an exaggeration to say that victors enjoy the spoils and write history, and with the defeat of the ultrareactionary Carlists in provinces that had previously enjoyed
fueros privileges in setting their own laws, the German-born King looked to Bismarck in his home country for a model on curtailing errant provinces. A believer in the modern liberal state and the Spanish constitution, at Leopold's insistence the Prim government drew up a compromise where the provinces would elect provincial councils, but Madrid would still appoint a "jefe politico" as an executive office, rather than have the solely appointed chief wield all power as was the case under the original constitution. This was viewed as a good model for bringing the six Caribbean provinces back into the fold as well as the war wound down there - four provinces in Cuba, and one each for Santo Domingo and Puerto Rico, all enjoying the same rights as Spanish citizens and representation in the indirectly-elected Cortes [1]. As for the unique fueros, those were gone, with all of Spain to be ruled under a single uniform set of laws, privileges and political custom. The threat of a Carlist Bourbon restoration may have been gone, but in centralizing power in Madrid further, the anger in the fueros provinces had not gone away..."

- Carlismo: A History of Spanish Revolution and Reaction


[1] It's my understanding that under the 1869 Spanish constitution the Spanish Cortes was indirectly elected by province under universal male suffrage
 
The Scramble for Asia: Colonialism in the Far East in the 19th Century
"...complicating matters for the child Gojong specifically and Korean interstate relations generally was that Korea was still officially a tributary state of China, an arrangement that France's soft protectorate over the Hermit Kingdom had not changed. Despite the Treaty of Ganghwa Island being thoroughly unequal, the guarantees within it were, by the standards of the day, quite soft: France would have an exclusive concession to Busan's harbor, Catholic missionaries would enjoy the protection of the Korean state with the entirety of Korea to be held responsible for any priest's violent death (no Protestant missionary enjoyed this level of protection anywhere in Asia, and in practice France intended only to enforce it against ethnically French missionaries), and France would "ensure" Korea's territorial integrity against other European powers. In the court in Seoul, though, a power struggle continued between the feudal yangban landowner class and modernizers. Stepping into this difficult situation was Japan, which in 1873, after an incident off the Takeshima Rocks, demanded an apology from Korea and sailed a gunboat into the mouth of the Han, briefly shelling Ganghwa Island. The Japan-Korea Treaty of 1873 was designed by Japan to attempt to dislodge Korea from Chinese tributary state once and for all, by recognizing it as a "free and sovereign nation with the same rights as Japan," a declaration France had no issue with but which caused alarm in Peking. France, however, interceded in efforts for Japan to open two treaty ports in Korea, and so only Wonsan was opened to Japanese commerce. Korea now was at the center of three competing powers looking to economically dominate it..."

- The Scramble for Asia: Colonialism in the Far East in the 19th Century
 
The threat of a Carlist Bourbon restoration may have been gone, but in centralizing power in Madrid further, the anger in the fueros provinces had not gone away..."
Still Interesing Leopold Pushing more Centralization and the Federalization, maybe he learned this could not work as well as in germany itself?
 
Still Interesing Leopold Pushing more Centralization and the Federalization, maybe he learned this could not work as well as in germany itself?

It helps in Germany that there's a common tongue and most member-states were already using the Napoleonic code, and that there hadn't been a reactionary war in non-Prussian regions against Berlin where people took shots against the Kaiser (recall that Leopold was nearly killed during a parade ITTL and Arsenio Martinez-Campos lost the use of his left arm during the assassination attempt). And the idea of decentralized provincial fiefdoms was very much an anti-liberal idea at the time - this was the age of the liberal nation-state, one I believe Leopold would have been bought into (I'm mirroring him and Maximilian of Mexico's views on this a little, though the decentralization in Mexico is obviously much more extreme). One of the historical issues in Spain after all has been patching together the various Iberian states and pseudo-states into a coherent polity, going back centuries and affecting the country even today OTL... the centralist liberal constitution Leopold is upholding here is probably one of the better bets to get that unitary Spain, which the country would have benefitted from as opposed to the chaotic 1870s it had IOTL.

Ouch feel sorry for korea stuck between China ,France,Japan, and internal problems

Indeed. Korea could very well ITTL rapidly turn into the Balkans of the Far East, if you follow my meaning...
 
Maximilian of Mexico
"...President Miguel Garcia Granados had stepped down, letting his considerably more aggressive deputy Justo Rufino Barrios take Guatemala's Presidency instead. Barrios would emerge as one of the most important figures in Central American history and his effects on Maximilian's reign starting with his rise of power in 1873 are incalculable. Barrios was a liberal, like Garcia Granados, but considerably more radical in his goals and projects than even Benito Juarez of Mexico had been in setting off the Reform War. Barrios purged his Conservative opponents, still outraged that Conservatives from Honduras had attempted to invade his country to dislodge Liberal Party members there, confiscated all Indian land to be doled out to preferred landlords and confining the native Mayans to effective peonage, and 1873 would mark the start of one of the world's most aggressive anticlerical campaigns, in which nearly all church property in Guatemala was entirely confiscated by the state [1]. Despite the disgust many Mexican elites had for Barrios, Maximilian saw him in more coldly pragmatic terms - as a potential pawn in a game to carve out a sphere of influence in Central America. The Tehuantepec Railway would open early in 1874 and by 1877 be connected to the Puebla-Veracruz line, thus integrating the booming Central Mexican economy with the new trans-isthmian connection. Ports at Coatzocoalcos and Salina Cruz would thrive thanks to their proximity to Asia, Europe and North America compared to the Panama Railway, which despite crossing a narrower isthmus was in an isolated part of Colombia not connected to the rest of the country by rail or even road and required longer routes to reach. Maximilian's greatest fear, though, was of potential foreign designs on a canal through Nicaragua or Panama, ideas that had been broached by other countries, most notably France. With France no longer his main patron - it was an Anglo-American consortium that had financed Tehuantepec, though rival American firms were said to be intrigued by other Central American crossings - Maximilian was well aware that France was interested in pursuing an alternative to Tehuantepec, and that became plain when French banks bought out the Panama Railway in 1875. Viewing the five disparate states of Central America as "little dwarves ready to be vassalized," and fearing European powers meddling in Central America and playing the small republics off one another to potentially locate new rail or canal routes to bypass his new national achievement, Maximilian, and to a lesser extent his chief advisers, saw the belligerent Barrios and his visions of a Union of Central America as a potential opportunity to head off a "great power game" in Mexico's poor, unstable backyard..."

- Maximilian of Mexico


[1] All 100% as in OTL. Barrios did not mess around
 
Any chance of a world map or at least a map of north America?what mexico stability like vs OTL?

I welcome anyone who wants to take a stab at drawing a world map to do so! I am not a talented mapmaker so I shy away from it. Some initial notes:

- Mexico is divided into the departments that Maximilian devised for it rather than her OTL states
- The Confederacy includes the southern half of Arizona and New Mexico, Oklahoma and Kentucky, but not West Virginia or Missouri
- Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico are now Spanish provinces
- PEI is not part of Canada

Other than that, the only substantive changes in Europe are France's possession of Alsace-Lorraine and Germany's annexation of Luxembourg. In Asia, Cambodia is a German satellite state/protectorate rather than a French one, and Laos is still Siamese.

Mexico is way more stable than OTL, though there are still a lot of caudillo-style bosses in far-flung provinces even with a stronger central government in Mexico City. There's a small scale industrial revolution in its nascenscy in places like Mexico City, Puebla, Guadalajara and Queretaro, Veracruz is emerging as a major port, and immigration is burgeoning compared to OTL.
 
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