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rrest's decision to tie the Confederacy to the fate of a small and relatively young insurrection in Cuba, rather than the larger, albeit abolitionist one in the island's east, would prove to add another strange angle to the fluid, complicated situation on the ground in Cuba..."
And now the fun beggining..i think the dixies will learn they're hitting outside their weight class
 
A Demographic History of the Americas in the 19th Century
"...the Confederacy was no stranger to accepting immigrants, though unlike in the Union - where 1870 would prove the beginning point of one of the largest migration waves in human history even as Irish and Germans had filled the country for decades - it lacked, at least outside of Richmond, the heavy industry that attracted ambitious immigrant labor from Europe or to a lesser extent East Asia. Rather, the Confederacy was at the receiving and giving end of population transfers related specifically to its peculiar institution of chattel slavery and the shaking out of the War of Independence.

Much like the United Empire Loyalists who essentially founded Canada, Unionists - especially in the Appalachian regions of states such as Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee - migrated north in the mid to late 1860s, particularly in Tennessee where a number of East Tennessee "Tories" (so named to derisively compare them to the British Loyalists of the Revolution) were lynched in 1867 at the height of Nathan Forrest's rise to power. Though such "Southern Tories" moved north from a number of states, it was those three states that provided the bulk of them. These white laborers who typically had little interest in slavery and had served in the Union Army were suddenly strangers in their own country, especially those who were dismissed as traitors for their service in "Yankee Blue" by the Kuklos Klan. As many as 80,000 Kentuckians, 15,000 North Carolinians, 10,000 Virginians not accounted for in the seceded U.S. state of West Virginia, 25,000 Tennesseans and 5,000 Arkansans who had served as Union soldiers moved northwards in the decade following 1862, with their primary destinations being the industrial regions of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Illinois. [1] Many of them moved further West still, becoming the homesteaders who helped settle the Great Plains alongside Germans and Scandinavians recruited by railroad companies to immigrate to the New World and, to their surprise, an increasing number of runaway slaves seeking a new life outside the Confederacy.

There was movement from North to South as well, however. In the immediate aftermath of the war, slaveholding families - particularly influential ones - fled Missouri, Maryland and Delaware to the more welcoming confines of the Confederacy out of fear of abolition - an event they may have escalated by shrinking the slave lobby remaining in the Union by the time of the 1869 Abolition Amendments, which seemed uncontroversial considering the bloody violence the slave question had caused but a decade earlier. A particularly prominent movement came from Baltimore, a city deeply divided in its sympathies, where much of its slaveholding upper class came to settle in Richmond and helped usher in prosperity for that city. By the time of abolition, it was estimated that more than half of Maryland's slaves had been taken south.

So it was not unusual for Southerners then who began to receive new immigrants to the ports of Savannah, Tampa and New Orleans in 1871 - from Cuba and to a much lesser extend, Brazil. Worried about the long-term prospects of slavery after the Free Birth Law, a small number of slaveowners from Brazil began to emigrate to where they were confident in slavery's survival. As for Cubans, the flow of Western Cuba's plantocracy had already begun years before as the rebellion started, but the abolition of slavery by Spain gave it an extra push, followed closely by Puerto Rican
hacendados seeking to keep their chattel. It should be noted, though, that this migration from the Caribbean and South America of wealthy planters was fairly small in real numbers and percentage wise - as the ruling class of their homelands, the vast majority stayed where they were..."

- A Demographic History of the Americas in the 19th Century

[1] The numbers of those who served the Union in total during the war from these states are higher - however, seeing as how the war ended 2.5 years early effectively ITTL and not every Loyalist would leave their home, I lowballed the number of who would immigrate to the Union slightly lower. These are essentially Scotch-Irish "Appalachian" people, rather than the more English white population of the plantation/farming South.
 
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Appalachian regions of states such as Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee - migrated north in the mid to late 1860s, particularly in Tennessee where a number of East Tennessee "Tories" (so named to derisively compare them to the British Loyalists of the Revolution) were lynched in 1867 at the height of Nathan Forrest's rise to power. Though such "Southern Tories" moved north from a number of states, it was those three states


Four states listed, but 'those three'.

KingSweden24 said:
By the time of abolition, it was estimated that more than half of Maryland's slaves had fled south.
KingSweden24 said:
- A Demographic History of the Americas in the 19th Century

Is this 'Demographic History' intended to be an apologia of slavery? Because I'm pretty sure any slaves moving south from Maryland didn't have any say in the matter, so 'fleeing' is the wrong word.
 
Maximilian of Mexico
"...as he neared the halfway point of his Plan Nacional, Maximilian was increasingly restless. It would be fair to say that though his accomplishments were many, he had still fallen well short of many of his goals. Colonias of European immigrants in the Yucatan had not succeeded the way he had hoped (though immigration to other parts of Mexico, especially larger cities, had been a more modest success), the rail network he had envisioned had only reached about half the capacity he had hoped it would hit by this time, and the less said of his dreams of a Mexican Navy, the better. By late 1871, the true impacts of his reign were on stability - nearly a decade since the Battle of Puebla drove the Juarez and Diaz government into exile in the north - and economic growth and education. While the gymnasia schools he envisioned as a free and mandatory public education base had not become as widespread as hoped, there was at least now in most towns and cities true choice for families between the free schools for children aged 8-14 (beyond that age, schooling was optional) and parish schools run by the Church, which the devout Maximilian had refused to shut down or completely replace, to the dismay of secular liberals [1]. The growth of the economy, particularly in silver mining and light industry in Mexico City, Queretaro and Guadalajara, had also been a huge positive for Maximilian. It was under this general backdrop that he made his first foreign trip as Emperor, leaving a pregnant Carlota behind as Regent in his absence along with First Minister Vibaurri and, out of caution, bringing with him the Great Marshal of the Army, Miguel Miramón, who despite their longstanding partnership Maximilian had never fully trusted as Miramón had served as an acting head of state for the Conservatives in the Reform Wars [2].

The overseas trip of Maximilian left from Acapulco with his adopted son's sloop escorting his ship all the way to San Francisco, where Maximilian would meet in a grand affair President Salmon Chase. It would be the first bilateral meeting in US-Mexico history between heads of state rather than via envoys or ministers, and Maximilian became the first foreign head of state to visit California while Chase in turn was the first President to visit the state while in office (his predecessor, Horatio Seymour, had driven in the Transcontinental golden spike in nearby Utah Territory and then taken the train back east afterwards). It would be the first step in the thawing of frosty relations between the two countries; though Seymour's administration had recognized Maximilian's reign years earlier, Chase's Republican Party was still seen as smarting from the Monroe Doctrine violation Maximilian's crowning was seen to have been. Of course, one of the many topics in that September meeting was the worries about a war in the Caribbean over Cuba..."

-
Maximilian of Mexico

[1] I'll admit I don't completely understand what Max's vision for Mexico's "German-style" education system would be seeing as it was still a rural, agrarian and mestizo country with large hacienda economies. This is as close to a guesstimate as I can come as to what would probably have happened, since I can't see him shutting down every parish school in the country with his allies and opening public schools that teenagers who need to work in every village would probably be tough to manage by 1871.
 
we didn't got footnote #2 but yeah i doubt he would close all parish school that easily, too useful in a still very illiterate country, and yeah a german style Gimnasio(Gimnasia means to the sport in spanish, when Gimnasion means both Gym and education place, like Athens Gymnasium) is possible but would take a long term to happen, specially in rural areas.
 
we didn't got footnote #2 but yeah i doubt he would close all parish school that easily, too useful in a still very illiterate country, and yeah a german style Gimnasio(Gimnasia means to the sport in spanish, when Gimnasion means both Gym and education place, like Athens Gymnasium) is possible but would take a long term to happen, specially in rural areas.

shoot yeah I forgot what I was gonna write there...

gimnasio! Gotcha. Thanks for the correction
 
"...as he neared the halfway point of his Plan Nacional, Maximilian was increasingly restless. It would be fair to say that though his accomplishments were many, he had still fallen well short of many of his goals. Colonias of European immigrants in the Yucatan had not succeeded the way he had hoped (though immigration to other parts of Mexico, especially larger cities, had been a more modest success), the rail network he had envisioned had only reached about half the capacity he had hoped it would hit by this time, and the less said of his dreams of a Mexican Navy, the better. By late 1871, the true impacts of his reign were on stability - nearly a decade since the Battle of Puebla drove the Juarez and Diaz government into exile in the north - and economic growth and education. While the gymnasio schools he envisioned as a free and mandatory public education base had not become as widespread as hoped, there was at least now in most towns and cities true choice for families between the free schools for children aged 8-14 (beyond that age, schooling was optional) and parish schools run by the Church, which the devout Maximilian had refused to shut down or completely replace, to the dismay of secular liberals [1]. The growth of the economy, particularly in silver mining and light industry in Mexico City, Queretaro and Guadalajara, had also been a huge positive for Maximilian. It was under this general backdrop that he made his first foreign trip as Emperor, leaving a pregnant Carlota behind as Regent in his absence along with First Minister Vibaurri and, out of caution, bringing with him the Great Marshal of the Army, Miguel Miramón, who despite their longstanding partnership Maximilian had never fully trusted as Miramón had served as an acting head of state for the Conservatives in the Reform Wars.

The overseas trip of Maximilian left from Acapulco with his adopted son's sloop escorting his ship all the way to San Francisco, where Maximilian would meet in a grand affair President Salmon Chase. It would be the first bilateral meeting in US-Mexico history between heads of state rather than via envoys or ministers, and Maximilian became the first foreign head of state to visit California while Chase in turn was the first President to visit the state while in office (his predecessor, Horatio Seymour, had driven in the Transcontinental golden spike in nearby Utah Territory and then taken the train back east afterwards). It would be the first step in the thawing of frosty relations between the two countries; though Seymour's administration had recognized Maximilian's reign years earlier, Chase's Republican Party was still seen as smarting from the Monroe Doctrine violation Maximilian's crowning was seen to have been. Of course, one of the many topics in that September meeting was the worries about a war in the Caribbean over Cuba..."

-
Maximilian of Mexico

[1] I'll admit I don't completely understand what Max's vision for Mexico's "German-style" education system would be seeing as it was still a rural, agrarian and mestizo country with large hacienda economies. This is as close to a guesstimate as I can come as to what would probably have happened, since I can't see him shutting down every parish school in the country with his allies and opening public schools that teenagers who need to work in every village would probably be tough to manage by 1871.
 
@KingSweden24 you could have easily edit the previous one, still nice buddy
You should reduce lower starting date, to 6-14, that way they can get 8 year(9 would be prefered) of education
 
The Wizard of the Saddle: The Life of Nathan Forrest
"...the South had not been so abuzz with excitement since the day secession was proclaimed and the Union fired upon Fort Sumter. The newspapers in the fall of 1871, led by Confederate Representative and known Circler Robert Rhett's Charleston Mercury [1], compared the impending war in Cuba to the War of Southern Independence. In their eyes, it was a just war to defend a way of life from an abolitionist, centralist power effectively foreign to the land it controlled and sought to impose its own beliefs upon. State's rights as a justification was replaced with vague bromides about the Monroe Doctrine, "the self-determination of national interest" and a hemisphere free of "the imperial yoke." [2]

Within the Forrest administration there were arguments early on from the initial recognition of the "West Cuban Republic" as the legitimate government of the entire island. More cautious men such as Vice President Breckinridge argued that the Confederacy's only purpose in the intervention was to end the now three-side war in Cuba as quickly as possible and pursue a peace settlement, with the overarching aim of an independent Cuba within the sphere of Confederate influence. Secretary of State Isham Harris was much bolder - though not a Circler, he viewed the Confederacy's "Manifest Destiny" as aiming south rather than west, and believed the Confederacy's aim should be to secure the island and institute the West Cuban government as a territorial government with an aim towards eventual statehood, much in the way the United States had tried to buy Cuba more than once from Spain. Treasury Secretary Reagan, who had modestly improved the Confederacy's finances in his nearly four years in office and would be leaving the Cabinet in a few months to take a Senate seat he had just been elected to and accepted from the Texas Legislature, was at the far end of the spectrum, arguing against the diplomatic recognition of the West Cuban government. He was confident that unlike the recognition offered by Britain and France a decade earlier, this time there would be no foreign aid for the Confederacy as Spain was a continental European power, and noted that Cuba was Spain's last colony of prestige and Spanish would fight tooth and nail to keep it, especially as the East Cuban rebels under Cespedes - abolitionist and liberal - were internally divided over their end goals and much of Spain's new liberal constitution and government more or less aligned with their overarching demands [3].

President Forrest fell somewhere in the middle of these camps. First and foremost, he supported intervening on behalf of the West Cuban [4] rebels, but he agreed largely with Reagan's skepticism over the ease of the war and took the view that the Confederacy's best bet was, in the short term, to secure Havana and as much of the island as they could, pushing Spanish garrisons into the territory controlled by the Eastern rebel group so they would fight each other, and then determine at that time what the best possible settlement would be. It was an ambitious plan to be followed by uncharacteristic pragmatism, influenced not by Harris's grandeur or Reagan's pessimism but Forrest's consultation with a group of Cuban exiles who visited the Gray House.

As the 1871 midterms, the last of Forrest's Presidency, rolled through, bringing a hawkish Congress to power as the Kuklos Klan whipped support for intervention, Forrest announced a "Cuban Expeditionary Force" to be formed, 60,000 men in total to begin with drawn from the Confederate Army and any volunteers. Thousands of Klansmen volunteered for the hope of pay and plunder, and Forrest and his new Navy Secretary, John L. Porter, set about planning strategy over Thanksgiving dinner..."


-The Wizard of the Saddle: The Life of Nathan Forrest

[1] Rhett's OTL newspaper, here not shuttered during the ACW
[2] All of this is complete self-serving nonsense in the interest of perpetuating slave power, if you can't tell
[3] Credit where it is due - since 19th century Spanish history is not my strong suit, I've been reading an old TL on this site, "A Prussian on the Spanish Throne" by @Tocomocho, for some insight into the potential political ramifications of Leopold's accession and the survival of Juan Prim and the liberal 1869 constitution. Obviously, we go in a WAY different direction than in that TL (I mean for starters there's an independent CSA and Napoleon III's crown is still on his head), but it's a pretty interesting read that has at least helped me understand some of the players in this period of Spanish history and the nature of the Ten Years War in Cuba. Highly recommend.
[4] Open to any suggestions on who a potential leader from Cuba's western planter class could be
 
If William IV dies childless then his brother Prince Alexander will take the throne. He was apparently far more capable and intelligent than his brother so hopefully he can turn the Netherlands around.

Indeed! Alexander was much more highly regarded than his boozy, debauched brother.
 
Forrest has just made a huge mistake.
I would be inclined to agree... and that'll be the focus on a lot of the future updates!

Thank you for reading and commenting, btw! I love to hear from my readers!
I'm hoping this backfires spectacularly on the Confederates.
Of course it will. specially facing a real nation and one could ask help certain other in the diplomatic arena..if anything make this more hilarous when they got a bloody nose in cuba.
 
So does Nashville, TN still make this, how should I put this... "unique" statue of Forrest?

1588359000112.png
 
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