Changing of the Seasons: an Independent Oregon TL

Changing of the Seasons: an Independent Oregon TL
Hello everyone, this is another iteration of the TL that I've been planning for a while. Going from a POD of John Tyler dying in the USS Princeton incident, the world kind of spirals over the next century and a half, with a lot of changes. Unlike my written TL, I actually have several graphics ready, so I should be able to post a lot. Feel free to ask plenty of questions about the world at large!
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Is that a ONE BILLION population drop in a few years? Did a semi-global (aka Cuban crisis-level, not IRL 80s) nuclear war happen?

Very interesting map
 
Is that a ONE BILLION population drop in a few years? Did a semi-global (aka Cuban crisis-level, not IRL 80s) nuclear war happen?

Very interesting map
Thanks! ITTL there was a greater focus on chemical and biological weapons and an arms race between the major powers in the first half of the 20th century for their development (without a world-level conflict until the 40s there are no blanket bans on such weapons). As a result, the widespread use of these in war quickly outstrip their intended use and kill a third of the global population. Because they aren't as flashy or immediately devastating as Nukes, they are used more liberally until their use spirals into a global threat.
What's with the season framework in the global population map?
The incredible destruction of the Great War (1949-55) and subsequent diseases gives credence to the idea of a 'civilizational cycle' theory in Western Europe (and to an extent North America), wherein civilizations undergo 'seasonal epochs' of development, and a chronology is formed by the French and subsequent B.N.E.E. trying to quantify these epochs. The idea of dividing human history into 'epochal ages' was not uncommon in Western Christianity in the past, so its not too much of a leap. Of course, the resulting 'seasonal calendar' only takes into account Western European and some Middle Eastern events, and so is only commonly adopted by certain European countries (and some Francophones in the US and elsewhere).
How does kurultai democracy, popular democracy and Ama-Ala work?
The original Kurultai was a sort of elective body that would issue edicts and serve in a similar way to the Icelandic thing and other systems (its still used as a sort of ritual / social festival OTL across Central Asia and as far as Hungary, although the word itself is Mongol in origin). Effectively, Kurultai's work similarly to parliaments, although they more often use functional constituencies (often taken from certain councils). Kurultai democracies are also very multilayered, where certain members of the National Assembly would be elected from local assemblies and there from mayors, trade unions, universities, fraternities, and other bodies. National assemblies tend to elect a provisional leader (or leaders), so in that way it functions similar to Parliaments that elect a president. The actual functioning of this system varies greatly from country to country, but in Oregon it is similar to a parliamentary system, where a proportional number of Assemblymen are elected from each department, and elect a 'Speaker' who functions as a head of government. These systems can also have sovereign or implied of heads of state (the Pamir states use a varient of Kurultai, but are also monarchies so are marked so on the map).

Popular Democracy is ideally a system akin to the ancient Greek 'democracy' system, or mob rule (as it is also called). As few if any of the states labelled 'popular democracies' actually function in that sort of sense, it is kind of an arbitrary term that could be comported with Kurultai democracies. In the case of the B.N.E.E and its allies, it describes their 'body' system, where the state is technically a single individual made up of cells who ideally have a coequal relationship with eachother and together make policy for the survival of the body as a whole. In reality, these states are run by 'Neurons' which run a sort of command economy, and 'Leukocytes' to purge 'infections' in the body, and the average cell does not have all that much of a say in governance. Popular Democracy is not all ultra-authoritarian Hobbesianism though, places like Mulkistan do de jure function on public referenda and a nationally inclusive legislature. De Facto, the government type labels don't mean all that much to the nature and functioning of the states themselves, as the situation is always more complicated individually. Certain Popular Democracies could be considered one-party states for example, although these can't be considered to close to political parties in the OTL representative democracy sense, and more like Gadhafi-style personalist organizations and the like.

The system of Ama-ala originated OTL among the diffuse organization of Igbo villages and towns. Each village would be relatively autonomous, and be ruled by a council of people chosen in several different ways. One important aspect of this system was the 'village strike,' where villagers would refuse to do work if the council moved too far against their interests (OTL this was cracked down on by the British and more organized Igbo authorities). In the absence of direct colonialism and the rapid development of the Bight of Benin region, this political ideology spreads across much of West Africa. In the modern day, many of the cities in the 'Uwa Ama Ala' function in a mandala-like system, where each major city functions as a public corporation, and citizens participate in something akin to workplace democracy. Through cycles of investment, competition, and resource development, many of these cities have become highly rich and influential, with some (like Porto-Novo) enough to merit inclusion as a separate 'state' on maps. In reality, most of these polities do not function like a Westphalian state system, and the Uwa Ama Ala especially doesn't, although the alternative is hard to map, and this map (being made in a 'Western' context ITTL) chooses to oversimplify. It should be noted that certain places in West Africa, such as the Yoruba kingdoms do function similarly to states (not nation-stated though, the Yoruba nation is a shared thing). Soudan could also be considered an Ama-ala system, although its mandala components technically have a rotating central government and are an established confederation, so it's marked differently.
 
The incredible destruction of the Great War (1949-55) and subsequent diseases gives credence to the idea of a 'civilizational cycle' theory in Western Europe (and to an extent North America), wherein civilizations undergo 'seasonal epochs' of development, and a chronology is formed by the French and subsequent B.N.E.E. trying to quantify these epochs. The idea of dividing human history into 'epochal ages' was not uncommon in Western Christianity in the past, so its not too much of a leap. Of course, the resulting 'seasonal calendar' only takes into account Western European and some Middle Eastern events, and so is only commonly adopted by certain European countries (and some Francophones in the US and elsewhere).
Oswald Spengler approves.
 
Global Defense Council Permanent Members
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During the Postwar Crisis (1955-1959), there was a widespread consensus that some sort of International governing body would be needed to tame the undue spread of diseases brought about by war. Various national and international health organizations merged in 1957 under the Treaty for the Creation and Maintenance of a Global Immune System, one of many treaties forging the Organization for Global Security (OGS). During Winter (IV), the organization was expanded to include most countries across the globe. In 1970, Russia, the British Commonwealth, China, and Turkey were added as members, forming the Global Defense Council (GDC). Alongside the seven permanent members, an additional five members are cycled yearly from amongst the other World nations. GDC Edicts form the backbone for modern international law, superseding national law, although they do not supersede Regional Law. The GDC serves as an institution for international crisis management, leading the Aerosol Campaign, the Intervention in Ecuador, and Operation Phalange, among many others. The GDC is also known as The Shield, due to its image as an international defender of common humanity. Russia's seat has since been moved to Merv as part of the integration of the Eurasian Joint Cooperation Council, while the Commonwealth seat has been moved around various times before being finalized at Labuan.
 
What does BNEE stand for?
It stands for 'Bloc National pour un Été Éternal', or National Body for an Eternal Summer, as in the graphic. ITTL French (alongside portuguese) is the global lingua franca, and so many of the French acronyms keep their form
 
The United States County Map
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A basic map of the United States and its Constituent Nations as of 2024, denoting internal county borders within the states (this is from back when I thought it would be a good idea to map out 1000 alternate counties in QGIS)
 
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Assuming GSLI is equivalent to HDI, why is Europe still so low even 60+ years after the war? Admittedly a Euroscrew of this scale is an interesting concept, but you'd think they'd recover to at least OTL Latin American living standards.
 
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Eurasian Famine and the Spring-Summer Transition
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This map depicts famine levels at their peak in 2019, they would decline over the next three years

The effects of the Great War did not end with deaths on the battlefield, nor with the devastation of the plagues of the 50s and 60s. Widespread use of soil poisoning and long-term biological agents like anthrax substantially decreased yields in affected areas for decades after the war. Regions most affected were in Eastern and Central Europe and on the Indian Subcontinent, a result of the devastating Indian War (1957-1963). While the use of Gemulaic[1] Modified Foods have massively increased crop yields across the developed world, many areas do not have access to such technologies and have struggled to feed their rapidly growing populations. As the world population is set to pass an unprecedented six billion as soon as 2030, many countries have failed to keep up food production. These effects are compounded by the threat of Anthropogenic Warming[2], caused by the release of Carbon Dioxide and other gasses into the atmosphere. Beginning in 2018, crop failures across Eurasia cascaded into a food crisis and eventually a famine, prompting intervention from the GDC. In 2019, the ongoing famines were declared a Global Crisis, and a coalition was formed to provide relief and combat piracy in the South China Sea and Indian Ocean that was hampering aid efforts. By 2022, the crisis was over, but not without many casualties, with estimates reaching up to 60 million dead worldwide, which would make it the worst event in terms of mortality rates since the '61 Plague.

[1]: Genetics
[2]: Global Warming
 
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Thanks for the comments everyone! I appreciate it, I'm working on a big update rn (Oregon Wiki article) so I'll put some small ones out in the meantime
So did London just get completely wiped off the map? Also, what happened to Canada?
Like many major European cities, London was bombarded heavily with Biological and Chemical weapons. In the aftermath of the war however, the new British government decided to move their administrative capital to Winchester. This was partially because GB is run by a sort of Anglo-Saxon LARPer government that has tried to purge all 'romance' words out of their vocabulary and wholeheartedly believes in the Norman Yoke theory (to them, the Saxe-Coburg-Gothas in Australasia are evil foreign leaders, and so GB is not part of the commonwealth). London still exists and still has a large population, but has suffered the fate of having much of its government and business apparatus removed.

Canada never confederated (OTL, the expansion of the US to the Pacific and the Civil War were inciting incidents for confederation, and as these go differently ITTL there is less of a reason to. Canada is just Upper and Lower Canada, although it was able to gain Ungava and North Ontario from the HBC and Britain and Labrador from Newfoundland. The Maritime union is a loose confederation of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and PEI, all of which are almost functionally independent. Manitobah and Swan River are small republics born of Canadien and Canadian settlers, and Saskatchewan was mostly populated by Americans moving North (all these are in the American sphere and are closely influenced by it).
Assuming GSLI is equivalent to HDI, why is Europe still so low even 60+ years after the war? Admittedly a Euroscrew of this scale is an interesting concept, but you'd think they'd recover to at least OTL Latin American living standards.
Considering a drop of almost 50% in population terms in various places, its not that much of a screw. Also, GSLI ratings do not properly transcribe to HDI, as ITTL living standards are not congruent with OTL. Parts of Europe are still rich, as Russia and the BNEE are second and third in economic rankings globally. While Europe is not nearly as developed as Latin America or Australasia, they are at a similar level to North America, and above much of Africa and Asia. GSLI also includes health, inequality, and other factors, and the former is influenced by lingering effects of the war (just as the AIDs crisis ruined HDI ratings in Southern Africa in the 90s and 00s). While Europe faces a lot of problems, coming into Summer they are on the up-and-up somewhat (Arguably Central Europe's situation could be compared to South America but with Russia and Brazil as the neocolonial actors rather than the US)
How technologically advanced is this world compared to OTL?
Technological developments vary from field to field. Biotech, genetics, and public health are all far more advanced fields, while computer tech lags somewhat behind OTL, and transportation / communications tech is way down. Telecommunications is behind-the-times somewhat, and civilian air travel and tourism is rare. Nuclear technology has been discovered, although no countries engaged in a nuclear arms race, and nuclear power is seen as a more civilian and commercial thing (although it is rarely used). Much of the worlds power comes from Hydropower, Coal, Oil, and Solar (Lithium and solar fields have made Jalu and the FRI obscenely rich). Advances in Physics, aerospace, and finance are also much slower than OTL. Overall, the level of technology depends on where in the world you are and and what field it is in, but in general science and technology are similar to OTL, if somewhat behind.
 
Only now did I notice that Rio de Janeiro's metro area has ITTL a whopping 21(!) million people. In comparison, IOTL it has about 11-12 million inhabitants in the Greater Rio area... it is fascinating to imagine how a much more populous Rio de Janeiro would be, although it makes me wonder what happened to São Paulo for it to not even be the second-largest metro area in Brazil (which is surprisingly occupied by Petrópolis, a medium-sized city IOTL)
 
This is insane (affectionate). I really am looking forward to seeing more about the B.N.E.E. and to learn how colonialism in Africa and the Pacific happened. For example I find it really fascinating that the US, despite lacking a Pacific coastline, has managed to gain a collection of islands in the region, as well as gaining parts of OTL's Gambia (which I like to imagine as being a purchase of the territory from the British in a secondary attempt of a Liberia).
 
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