Cevolian's Test Thread

Discussion in 'Post Test Messages Here' started by Cevolian, Mar 16, 2016.

  1. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    For test posts, images, PM lists and ideas etc.
     
  2. crazyself00 Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Testing, testing.
     
  3. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    A New Deal for Britain


    1908-1916: Herbert Asquith (Liberal)[1]
    Def. 1910: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Nicoll (Labour)
    1916-1919: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading wartime National Government with Conservative support)
    1919-1923: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading National Government with Conservative support)
    Def. 1918: Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), Herbert Asquith (Non-Coalition Liberal), William Adamson (Labour)
    1923-1924: Andrew Bonar-Law (Conservative-National Liberal Coalition)[2]
    Def. 1923: J.R. Clynes (Labour), Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
    1924-1926: Ramsay Macdonald Labour-Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1924: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative, David Lloyd George (National Liberal)
    1926: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour Minority Government)[3]
    1926-1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government with Liberal Party and National Labour participation)[4]
    Def. 1926: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), George Lansbury (Unionist Labour)
    Def. 1930: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), Oswald Mosely (New Party), T.E. Lawrence (New Deal Conservatives) , Stafford Cripps (Unionist Labour)

    1932-1937: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Deal Conservative leading National Government with New Party and National Liberal participation)[5]
    Def. 1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Arthur Henderson (National Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1937-1947: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)
    Def. 1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)



    [1] Asquith fell because of internal party divisions, and in the end his glorious war time premiership was taken over by Lloyd George. Asquith would remain as Leader of the Opposition until well after the war's 1919 end, having been thrown out of government by the Tory supported betrayal.
    [2] In 1924 the National Liberals collapsed, with many re-joining the old Liberal Party out of fear that the unpopularity of the war-time coalition (of which the government was a continuation), for the increasingly unfavourable peace and loss of Ireland, would mean they lost their seats. The government collapsed, but no new government could be formed.
    [3] The General Strike's support by Labour MPs lead to the Liberals breaking away out of solidarity against the Socialist Revolutionaries sin the strike, who were joined by many World War One veterans dissatisfied with how the government had handled the war and its aftermath. MacDonald led a brief minority government, before a vote of no confidence was called, which he lost.
    [4] Baldwin formed a National Government to "Rebuild Britain", and this coalition was maintained going into the 1929 Great Depression. He was forced to abandon the Lloyd George National Liberal's as the one condition for the mainstream party joining his coalition, a grave insult which would inform the party's lurch towards corporatism. Whilst an Interventionist course was pursued, young Junior Treasury Minister Oswald Mosely believed that a more interventionist course was needed. He stressed a Corporatist policy of the government, public, and major business cooperating to recover the economy, and the strength of the British Empire. Whilst rejected by the National Government, young Tory Radical T.E. Lawrence supported the measures and, when Mosely and his supporters fled to the opposition benches, Lawrence and his "New Deal Tories" followed, with the two entering into an alliance at the 1931 General Election to regain Baldwin his early large majority.
    [5] 1932 saw one of the most bitterly fought elections in British history, with the "New Deal Alliance" (The New Deal Tories, New Party and National Liberals) forming alongside the National Government (The Conservative, Liberal and National Labour Parties) and the much closer knit "Socialist-Labour Popular Front". Essentially the election was fought between three principles Corporatism-"soft" Interventionism-Socialism. In the end, by a slim majority, Corporatism won, and the hugely popular war-hero Thomas "Tom" Lawrence became Prime Minister. The new National Government (With Mosely as Chancellor and the ageing Lloyd George as Home Secretary) set out a "New Deal for Britain" to save her economy and her empire.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2016
  4. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Cevolian's Vignettes

    After 1900:

    In Spite of All Terror - Churchill at the top of a Britain curiously similar to another interwar state.

    "Britain Needs an Iron Lady"- Its election night 2015 as Britain celebrates its fifth election since the democratic transition...

    With your Best Interests in mind - The Queen is dead, and George Osborne wonders whether or not the post-assassination security measures have gone too far...

    A New Jerusalem - Britain is on the cusp of victory against the Second Continental System, and the Minister of Information gives the Secretary of State for Air a remarkable opportunity to help build the New Jerusalem.

    Twilight of the Hermit Kingdom - Its like Cain and Able but about a nuclear Civil War in modern North Korea.

    MORE COMING SOON
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
  5. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Letting the best be the enemy of the good.

    1970-1974: Ted Heath (Conservative)
    Def. 1970: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
    1974-1978:Ted Heath (Conservative-Liberal Coalition)[1]
    Def. 1974: Harold Wilson (Labour)
    1978-1979: Ted Heath (Conservative-Liberal Alliance)[2]
    Def. 1978: Barbra Castle (Labour), Roy Jenkins (SDP)
    1979-1982: Michael Heseltine (Conservative-Liberal Alliance)[3]
    1982-1983: Michael Heseltine (Conservative Minority Government)[4]
    1983-1983: Michael Foot (Labour Minority with Liberal Supply and Confidence and limited SDP support)[5]
    Def. 1983: Michael Heseltine (Conservative), David Owen (SDP)
    1984-1990: David Owen (SDP-Conservative Coalition)[6]
    Def. 1984: Michael Foot (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
    1986: Denis Healey (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal)

    1990-1994: John Smith (Labour-Liberal Coalition)[7]
    Def. 1990: David Owen (SDP), Geoffrey Howe (Conservative)
    1994-1999: Margaret Becket (Labour-Liberal Coalition)[8]
    Def. 1994: Ken Clarke (Conservative), Robert "Bob" Maclennan (SDP)
    1999-2007: Michael Portillo (Conservative Minority Government with Liberal and SDP Supply and Confidence)
    Def. 1999: Bob Maclennan (SDP), Margaret Becket (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal)
    2003: Simon Hughes(SDP), Gordon Brown (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal)

    2007-2010: David Milliband (SDP-Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 2007: Theresa May (Conservative), Alistair Darling (Labour)
    2010-2013: Nick Clegg (Liberal-SDP Coalition)
    Def. 2011: Boris Johnson (Conservative), Ed Balls (Labour)
    2013-2014: David Milliband (SDP-Liberal Coalition)
    2014-2016: Liz Kendall (SDP-Liberal Coalition)

     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016
  6. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Premiers of the British Socialist Republic, British and Scottish Federal Republic and British Republic

    1945-1953: Leonard Cotton (CPGB) (As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The Founding Father
    1953-1968: Rajani Dutt (CPGB) (As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The Stalinist Hardliner
    1968-1969: Harold Wilson (CPGB) (As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The Great Reformer
    1969-1987: Gordon McLennan (CPGB) (As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The Return to Normality
    1987-1989: Eric Heffer (CPGB)(As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The Fall of the Regime
    1989: Neil Kinnock (As General Secretary of the CPGB) - The last Communist.
     
  7. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North

    1908-1916: Herbert Asquith (Liberal)[1]
    Def. 1910: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Nicoll (Labour)
    1916-1919: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading wartime National Government with Conservative support)
    1919-1923: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading National Government with Conservative support)
    Def. 1918: Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), Herbert Asquith (Non-Coalition Liberal), William Adamson (Labour)
    1923-1924: Andrew Bonar-Law (Conservative-National Liberal Coalition)[2]
    Def. 1923: J.R. Clynes (Labour), Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
    1924-1926: Ramsay Macdonald Labour-Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1924: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative, David Lloyd George (National Liberal)
    1926: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour Minority Government)[3]
    1926-1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government with Liberal Party and National Labour participation)[4]
    Def. 1926: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), George Lansbury (Unionist Labour)
    Def. 1930: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), Oswald Mosely (New Party), T.E. Lawrence (New Deal Conservatives) , Stafford Cripps (Unionist Labour)

    1932-1937: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Deal Conservative leading National Government with New Party and National Liberal participation)[5]
    Def. 1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Arthur Henderson (National Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1937-1947: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)
    Def. 1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1947-1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)[6]
    1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party)
    1948-1949: Leo Amery (Independent Conservative leading National Reconstruction Government with National Conservatives-National Labourites-New Liberals and Moderate Socialists)[7]




    [1] Asquith fell because of internal party divisions, and in the end his glorious war time premiership was taken over by Lloyd George. Asquith would remain as Leader of the Opposition until well after the war's 1919 end, having been thrown out of government by the Tory supported betrayal.
    [2] In 1924 the National Liberals collapsed, with many re-joining the old Liberal Party out of fear that the unpopularity of the war-time coalition (of which the government was a continuation), for the increasingly unfavourable peace and loss of Ireland, would mean they lost their seats. The government collapsed, but no new government could be formed.
    [3] The General Strike's support by Labour MPs lead to the Liberals breaking away out of solidarity against the Socialist Revolutionaries sin the strike, who were joined by many World War One veterans dissatisfied with how the government had handled the war and its aftermath. MacDonald led a brief minority government, before a vote of no confidence was called, which he lost.
    [4] Baldwin formed a National Government to "Rebuild Britain", and this coalition was maintained going into the 1929 Great Depression. He was forced to abandon the Lloyd George National Liberal's as the one condition for the mainstream party joining his coalition, a grave insult which would inform the party's lurch towards corporatism. Whilst an Interventionist course was pursued, young Junior Treasury Minister Oswald Mosely believed that a more interventionist course was needed. He stressed a Corporatist policy of the government, public, and major business cooperating to recover the economy, and the strength of the British Empire. Whilst rejected by the National Government, young Tory Radical T.E. Lawrence supported the measures and, when Mosely and his supporters fled to the opposition benches, Lawrence and his "New Deal Tories" followed, with the two entering into an alliance at the 1931 General Election to regain Baldwin his early large majority.
    [5] 1932 saw one of the most bitterly fought elections in British history, with the "New Deal Alliance" (The New Deal Tories, New Party and National Liberals) forming alongside the National Government (The Conservative, Liberal and National Labour Parties) and the much closer knit "Socialist-Labour Popular Front". Essentially the election was fought between three principles Corporatism-"soft" Interventionism-Socialism. In the end, by a slim majority, Corporatism won, and the hugely popular war-hero Thomas "Tom" Lawrence became Prime Minister. The new National Government (With Mosely as Chancellor and the ageing Lloyd George as Home Secretary) set out a "New Deal for Britain" to save her economy and her empire.
    [6] After Lawrence and Mosely's assassinations the Foreign Secretary, a New Deal Tory, took over the government. He broke the coalition, and then was asked to step down by the King after the war was over and peace negotiated. Seeing the writing on the wall the Marquess did as ordered, and a National Reconstruction government was established, without the three "New" Parties.
    [7] Amery, father of a minor minister in the corporatist war government, was one of a few pro-war Tories who had not joined Lawrence's New Deal, and was trusted by everyone to run the country after the deposition. He quickly rebuilt Britain, but notably declined to implement a proportional representation system in the hopes the parties would coalesce into two moderate options.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2016
  8. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North

    1908-1916: Herbert Asquith (Liberal)[1]
    Def. 1910: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Nicoll (Labour)
    1916-1919: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading wartime National Government with Conservative support)
    1919-1923: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading National Government with Conservative support)
    Def. 1918: Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), Herbert Asquith (Non-Coalition Liberal), William Adamson (Labour)
    1923-1924: Andrew Bonar-Law (Conservative-National Liberal Coalition)[2]
    Def. 1923: J.R. Clynes (Labour), Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
    1924-1926: Ramsay Macdonald Labour-Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1924: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative, David Lloyd George (National Liberal)
    1926: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour Minority Government)[3]
    1926-1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government with Liberal Party and National Labour participation)[4]
    Def. 1926: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), George Lansbury (Unionist Labour)
    Def. 1930: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), Oswald Mosely (New Party), T.E. Lawrence (New Deal Conservatives) , Stafford Cripps (Unionist Labour)

    1932-1937: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Deal Conservative leading National Government with New Party and National Liberal participation)[5]
    Def. 1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Arthur Henderson (National Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1937-1947: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)
    Def. 1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1947-1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)[6]
    1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party)
    1948-1949: Leo Amery (Independent Conservative leading National Reconstruction Government with National Conservatives-National Labourites-New Liberals and Moderate Socialists)[7]
    1949-1959: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative-Imperial Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1949: Herbert Morrison (Labour) , Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Ernest Bevin (Socialist), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)
    1959: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour) , Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Ernest Bevin (Socialist), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)

    1959-1964: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour-Socialist Coalition)
    Def. 1959: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative), Anthony Eden (Imperial Conservative),Jo Grimond (Liberal), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)
    1964-1966: Hugh Gaitskell (Socialist Labour)
    Def. 1964: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative), Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative), Keith Joseph (anti-interventionist Conservatives), Jo Grimond (United Liberal), Anthony Crosland (New Labour)
    1966-1969: James Callaghan (Socialist Labour)
    1969-1970: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative-National Conservative-Democratic Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1969: James Callaghan (Socialist Labour), Anthony Crosland (New Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (United Liberal)
    1970-1971: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative-National Conservative Minority Coalition with United Liberal Supply and Confidence)
    1971-1976: George Brown (Socialist Labour)
    Def. 1971: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative), Iain Macleod (National Conservative) , Jeremy Thorpe (United Liberal), Anthony Crosland (New Labour), Enoch Powell (Democratic Conservative)
    1976: Anthony Crosland (New Labour-Internationalist Conservative-United Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1976: Edward Heath (National Conservative), Enoch Powell (Democratic Conservative), Anthony Benn (Socialist Labour), Imperial Conservative Rebels

    1976-1982: David Owen (New Labour-International Conservative-United Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1981: Michael Heseltine (National and Imperial Conservative), Norman Tebbit (Democratic Conservative), Michael Foot (Socialist Labour), Roy Jenkins (Social Democratic Labour Rebels)
    1982-1991: David Owen (New Labour leader of The Social National Government featuring New Labour, Internationalist Conservatives, Social Democrats and Social Democratic Liberals)
    Def. 1986: Douglas Hurd (National and Imperial Conservative), Norman Tebbit (Democratic Conservative), Denis Healey (Socialist Labour), Alan Sked (Liberal)
    1991-1992: Ken Clarke (National and Commonwealth Conservative-Democratic Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1991: David Owen (New Labour), Neil Kinnock (Socialist Labour), Tony Blair (Internationalist Party), John Smith (Social Democrat), Alan Sked (Liberal), Paddy Ashdown (Social Democratic Liberal)
    1992-1996: Michael Portillo (National Democratic and Commonwealth)


    [1] Asquith fell because of internal party divisions, and in the end his glorious war time premiership was taken over by Lloyd George. Asquith would remain as Leader of the Opposition until well after the war's 1919 end, having been thrown out of government by the Tory supported betrayal.
    [2] In 1924 the National Liberals collapsed, with many re-joining the old Liberal Party out of fear that the unpopularity of the war-time coalition (of which the government was a continuation), for the increasingly unfavourable peace and loss of Ireland, would mean they lost their seats. The government collapsed, but no new government could be formed.
    [3] The General Strike's support by Labour MPs lead to the Liberals breaking away out of solidarity against the Socialist Revolutionaries sin the strike, who were joined by many World War One veterans dissatisfied with how the government had handled the war and its aftermath. MacDonald led a brief minority government, before a vote of no confidence was called, which he lost.
    [4] Baldwin formed a National Government to "Rebuild Britain", and this coalition was maintained going into the 1929 Great Depression. He was forced to abandon the Lloyd George National Liberal's as the one condition for the mainstream party joining his coalition, a grave insult which would inform the party's lurch towards corporatism. Whilst an Interventionist course was pursued, young Junior Treasury Minister Oswald Mosely believed that a more interventionist course was needed. He stressed a Corporatist policy of the government, public, and major business cooperating to recover the economy, and the strength of the British Empire. Whilst rejected by the National Government, young Tory Radical T.E. Lawrence supported the measures and, when Mosely and his supporters fled to the opposition benches, Lawrence and his "New Deal Tories" followed, with the two entering into an alliance at the 1931 General Election to regain Baldwin his early large majority.
    [5] 1932 saw one of the most bitterly fought elections in British history, with the "New Deal Alliance" (The New Deal Tories, New Party and National Liberals) forming alongside the National Government (The Conservative, Liberal and National Labour Parties) and the much closer knit "Socialist-Labour Popular Front". Essentially the election was fought between three principles Corporatism-"soft" Interventionism-Socialism. In the end, by a slim majority, Corporatism won, and the hugely popular war-hero Thomas "Tom" Lawrence became Prime Minister. The new National Government (With Mosely as Chancellor and the ageing Lloyd George as Home Secretary) set out a "New Deal for Britain" to save her economy and her empire.
    [6] After Lawrence and Mosely's assassinations the Foreign Secretary, a New Deal Tory, took over the government. He broke the coalition, and then was asked to step down by the King after the war was over and peace negotiated. Seeing the writing on the wall the Marquess did as ordered, and a National Reconstruction government was established, without the three "New" Parties.
    [7] Amery, father of a minor minister in the corporatist war government, was one of a few pro-war Tories who had not joined Lawrence's New Deal, and was trusted by everyone to run the country after the deposition. He quickly rebuilt Britain, but notably declined to implement a proportional representation system in the hopes the parties would coalesce into two moderate options.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
  9. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    The Country's not for turning

    1970-1973: Edward Heath (Conservative)
    1973-1978: Edward Heath (Conservative-Liberal Coalition)
    1978-1978: Edward Heath (Conservative leading National Government of Conservatives, Liberals and Social Democrats)
    1979-1980: Earl Mountbatten (Independent National peer leading National Government of Conservatives, Liberals and Social Democrats)
    1980-1990: Norman Tebbit (National Democratic)
    1990-1990: Willie Whitelaw (National Democratic)
    1990-1991: Robert Armstrong (Former Cabinet Secretary leading National Government)
    1991-2000: Robin Cook (Democratic Labour)
    2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour)
    2001-2006: Chris Patten (Conservative-Liberal Alliance)
    2006-2008: John McDonnel (Democratic Labour Minority Government with Ecology and Social Justice Alliance Supply and Confidence)
    2008-2013: Vince Cable (Conservative Liberal Alliance)
    2013-2016: Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour)
     
  10. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    A murder has more than one victim - cover

    Cover.png

    Cover.png
     
  11. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    A murder has more than one victim

    1945-1952: Clement Attlee (Labour)
    1952-1955: Winston Churchill (Conservative-Liberal National Coalition)
    1955-1957: Anthony Eden (Conservative-Liberal National Coalition)
    1957-1958: Gwylim Lloyd-George (Liberal National-Conservative Coalition)
    1958-1962: Harold Macmillan (Conservative-Liberal National Coalition)
    1962-1962: Harold Macmillan (Conservative Minority Government)
    1962-1972: Harold Wilson (Labour)
    1972-1977: Denis Healey (Labour)
    1977-1980: David Steel (Liberal National and Unionist)
    1980-1981: David Penhaligon (Liberal National and Unionist-Labour-Conservative Emergency Government)


     
  12. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    The Country's not for turning

    1970-1973: Edward Heath (Conservative)
    Def.1970: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
    1973-1978: Edward Heath (Conservative-Liberal Coalition)
    Def.1973: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
    1978-1978: Edward Heath (Conservative leading National Government of Conservatives, Liberals and Social Democrats)
    Def.1978: Keith Joseph (National Democratic), Michael Foot (Labour), Roy Jenkins (SDP), David Steel (Liberal)
    1979-1980: Earl Mountbatten (Independent National peer leading National Government of Conservatives, Liberals and Social Democrats)
    1980-1990: Norman Tebbit (National Democratic)
    (1980: Seized power undemocratically.)
    1990-1990: Willie Whitelaw (National Democratic)
    1990-1991: Robert Armstrong (Former Cabinet Secretary leading National Government)
    1991-2000: Robin Cook (Democratic Labour)
    Def. 1991: Kenneth Clarke (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Collective Leadership (Ecology)
    Def. 1996: Michael Portillo (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Collective Leadership (Ecology), Peter Tatchell (Social Justice Alliance), Alan Clark (British Democratic)
    2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour)
    2001-2006: Chris Patten (Conservative-Liberal Alliance)
    Def. 2001: Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour), Collective Leadership (Ecology), Peter Tatchell (Social Justice Alliance), Ian Smith (British Democratic), James Goldsmith (National Party)
    2006-2008: John McDonnel (Democratic Labour Minority Government with Ecology and Social Justice Alliance Supply and Confidence)
    Def. 2006: George Osborne (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Collective Leadership (Ecology), Ian Smith (British Democratic),Peter Tatchell (Social Justice Alliance), Peter Bone (National Party)
    2008-2013: Vince Cable (Conservative-Liberal Alliance)
    Def. 2008: John McDonnel (Democratic Labour), Boris Johnson (British Democratic), Collective Leadership (Ecology), Ian McKellen(Social Justice Alliance), Jacob Rees-Mogg(National Party)
    2013-2016: Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour)
    Def. 2008: Vince Cable (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Theresa May (National Democratic), Zac Goldsmith (Ecology), Ian McKellen(Social Justice Alliance)

     
  13. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    History Repeats...


    1990-1996: John Major (Conservative)
    Def. 1992: Neil Kinnock (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
    1996-1997: Douglas Hurd (Conservative)
    1997-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
    Def. 1997: John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
    Def. 1999: Michael Portillo (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)

    2003-2007: Michael Portillo (Conservative)
    Def. 2003: Tony Blair, Simon Hughes (Liberal Democrat)


     
    Last edited: May 2, 2016
  14. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North

    History Repeats MKII


    1997-2001: John Smith (Labour)
    2001-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
    2003-2009: Peter Mandelson (Labour)
    2009-2010: Alistair Darling (Labour)
    2010-2016: William Hague (Conservative)
    2016-2020: Andy Burnham (Labour)
    2020-2020: William Hague (Conservative with Liberal Democrat Supply and Confidence)
    2020-2022: William Hague (Conservative)
    2022-2025: Chris Grayling (Conservative)
    2025-2037: Maria Eagle (Labour)
     
  15. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Section One

    ____________________________


    (Taken from "God save the King" by Sir Kingsley Amis, 1963)

    The Abdication and Dissolution Crises

    The Abdication Crisis of 1936 (and the Dissolution Crisis following it) is generally considered by modern observers to have been a regrettably brief interlude in British Constitutional history, and one which could very easily have led to very dire consequences rather than the largely peaceful transition that occurred. Whilst talk of a Second Civil War is no largely dismissed as fantasy, many at the time thought it very real, some even believing it to have been the King’s preferred course of actions following the (later regretted) abdication. Nevertheless the handling of the King’s ministers at the time and the sensible actions of those on both sides meant that the transition was smooth.

    The origin of the crisis was the marital and romantic situation of King Edward VIII in 1936 upon his ascension to the throne following his father’s surprise death. The young King was unmarried at the time, but many assumed he would marry his mistress since 1934, one Mrs Wallis Simpson “at a time at which she was able to do so” (meaning when she had divorced the embarrassed Mister Simpson). What from a distance could even be a fairy-tale story of an American divorcee and her prince charming became more complicated with the opposition of almost every political force in Britain…

    The immediate crisis itself is generally now considered to be somewhat peculiar in nature – Edward VIII’s mistress Mrs Wallis Simpson was initially opposed as Queen purely because she was an American Divorcee with a scandalous history, which saw widespread opposition by the church, the press, the public, and many establishment figures. This was likely enough to have led to an abdication on its own not long after the King’s declaration of his intent to marry her, but this could possibly have been the end of it and the rest of the Windsor family could well have retained their positions.

    Unfortunately for future generations of Britain’s former royal family this was not the last revelation; in late November 1936, as great tension surrounded the King, and battle lines had already been drawn, a rumour that Miss Simpson was a lover or former lover of Joachim Von Ribbentrop (then German Foreign Minister) was presented to Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin and was circulated in many newspapers the following day (although the rumour was notably referred to as “utter tripe” by Edward’s supporter Lord Beaverbrook, who refused to print it). No longer were Edward’s morals corrupted, but his whole relationship with Miss Simpson, who many now suspected of being a Nazi spy – the relationship with Von Ribbentrop, as it turned out, had both been real and was active at the time. Whilst some still claim otherwise it is now largely accepted that Simpson was working, at least partially, as a German spy.

    The Prime Minister met with the King, and informed him that the Morganatic Marriage which had been proposed would now be impossible, and informed him that if he endeavoured to marry Miss Simpson without an abdication his government would be forced to resign. Edward, concerned by the rumours, agreed to forgo marriage with Miss Simpson, leaving the Prime Minister with the impression that the relationship would be ended for the good of the country. Upon leaving the palace the Prime Minister is claimed to have remarked “I have consulted the King and we have resolved this issue; the King will stay, I will stay, the government will stay, and the problem shall go”.

    When information reached Baldwin that the relationship had not ended on the 11th December (sent in a letter by the King’s Private Secretary Alec Hardinge) the Prime Minister immediately phoned his majesty to inform him of his outrage, before setting out to intercept the King on his way to travel to Balmoral Castle. At the palace Baldwin questioned the King, who said he was unwilling to give up Simpson but would not marry her. This was not enough for Baldwin and when the facts were leaked to the press further conflict hardened his resolve. Upon getting a second round of agreements from Archibald Sinclair and Clement Attlee that they would form no new government for the King (notably failing to speak to Winston Churchill about the matter), Baldwin visited him once more, receiving a second refusal to give up Miss Simpson. On the eighteenth of December Baldwin left a meeting of the cabinet for Buckingham Palace and resigned as Prime Minister, throwing the country into chaos.



    (Taken from "My Father: What Truly Happened" by A.W. Baldwin, 1955)

    My father's Second Ministry came to an end largely because of the actions of King Edward and, though it was the ultimate result, my father did not expect this to be the end of his premiership - rather he expected the King to be forced to abdicate, and for this to be his great Cromwellian moment; the People vs the King with Baldwin in the lead. Whilst perhaps naïve, this was an admirable desire on his part, especially considering the scandalous spy-ring that surrounded the then King's entourage. Indeed it was only with the support of the other major party leaders that my father considered resignation (as he had already done some months earlier). It was a series of remarkably wily moves on the part of his majesty that led to his fall from grace (however brief) and the aborted rise of a new political order... whilst the Royalists are looked back at with a mixture of amusement and embarrassment they were a genuine concern for my father.

    (Taken from "The Building of Modern Britain" by William Stevenson Marr, 1999)


    The Churchill Coup

    It is one of history's most interesting mistakes that Stanley Baldwin failed to consult Winston Churchill when he made pre-emptive checks to ensure that no pro-Royalist government would be formed. Having initially said he would support Baldwin, Churchill had become reticent as time passed and the increasing calls for total abolition by many anti-King voices (most famously the future Labour Labour Cabinet Minister Stafford Cripps but also some voices in both the Liberal and Conservative parties). Indeed in his personal diary Churchill wrote that "I do not agree with H.M.'s choice of fiancée, but I rather more agree with that than the Cromwellian pretensions of his opponents."

    The former Home Secretary and the King would meet on the night of the 13th December, during the brief period between a Prime Ministerial resignation and the commencement of a General Election during which a new government may theoretically be formed. At the end of the three hour meeting the King and Churchill reached an agreement that, if Churchill could secure sufficient support, Mosely would accept him as leader of a new government. The quick scramble that followed led Churchill to the home of former Prime Minister David Lloyd George - under whom Churchill had served as a Liberal - and led to a deal being hashed out under which the Liberal MP would draw pro-King Liberals to support Churchill's bid for the premiership.

    On the 16th of December Churchill stood from the government backbenches and, in what Leo Amery called "The most careless piece of oratory in the history of Parliament", declared his intent to form a "Government of All Talents" (which was assumed to be a National Government) in support of King Edward. Baldwin, still sat as Prime Minister in the Commons, was utterly outraged and responded to Churchill demanding that he "cease this nonsense". It is hard to imagine his anger when Lloyd George then stood and spoke on Churchill's behalf in the house, followed by a number of Liberals and Conservatives.

    This was seen by many as an attempt by Churchill to form a "King's Party" (an idea championed by journalist Alistair Cooke). This idea had some degree of public support, and there was a groundswell of good feeling towards Churchill after his intentions were made clear and many thought that if it came to a General Election such a King's Party could win.
    The eventual vote on the matter, however, did not return Churchill as Prime Minister, with a huge majority voting against his government. No other attempts were made to form Governments in that Parliament, but the seeds of division were already sown...

    (Taken from "A Quiet Revolution - Life in Politics Volume 2, 1936-1938" by Alfred Duff Cooper, published 1970)

    The Collapse of the Old Party System


    "In those dark days immediately after Edward was forced to abdicate I had no idea what to do - on the one hand I wished to be loyal to my friend and oppose the absurd and radical Republicanism being espoused in some quarters, but at the same time the discovery that Wallis was... involved... with the Nazis was greatly disheartening. I must say that I was a lot slower than most of my contemporaries and, I wish to flatter myself to think, a lot more rational about my choice. Officially we were simply choosing new electoral alliances to run under for the General Election, but it was clear these "platforms" were going to quickly coalesce into parties... Stanley [Baldwin] had stepped aside as Tory leader already, but Neville [Chamberlain] and Leo [Amery] had quickly taken up his old policies and taken the "Constitutional" name because that was what they claimed to be protecting - in truth they were running against the King. The other choice was to go with Winston [Churchill] and his Royalists, or if I had departed form my senses to defect to Labour or the clearly and fervently anti-Monarchist "Liberal Alliance".

    The composition of these new groupings surprised me to some extent - most Tories either went to the Constitutionals or the Royalists, with a few National government supporting Liberals and a few who hadn't supported it but opposed extreme republicanism joining the Constitutional party. Labour remained Labour, of course, and by and large the Liberal Alliance was the anti-National Government Liberals and one battier government supporting Liberal (not that I could tell you that chap's name). The rest of the government supporting or "National" Liberals wanted to stay together and back the King, so they took the label "National" to describe their party, though I can't say I know why. National Labour stayed the same, more or less, but that was never really a choice.

    In the end it was Leo's comments about a monarch in favour of appeasing the Hitlerist regime that made me support the Constitutionals, it was an uncomfortable decision for me, but in the end country was more important than my friend and King. I have often doubted whether I did the right thing, but when Edward made some comments about Hitler later in life I came to reconcile myself with the fact that I probably had... it was the right choice politically of course, the alliance in opposition to the King came out of the whole affair far better than those for..."
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
  16. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North

    1908-1916: Herbert Asquith (Liberal)[1]
    Def. 1910: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Nicoll (Labour)
    1916-1919: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading wartime National Government with Conservative support)
    1919-1923: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading National Government with Conservative support)
    Def. 1918: Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), Herbert Asquith (Non-Coalition Liberal), William Adamson (Labour)
    1923-1924: Andrew Bonar-Law (Conservative-National Liberal Coalition)[2]
    Def. 1923: J.R. Clynes (Labour), Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
    1924-1926: Ramsay Macdonald Labour-Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1924: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative, David Lloyd George (National Liberal)
    1926: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour Minority Government)[3]
    1926-1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government with Liberal Party and National Labour participation)[4]
    Def. 1926: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), George Lansbury (Unionist Labour)
    Def. 1930: David Lloyd George (National Liberal), Oswald Mosely (New Party), T.E. Lawrence (New Deal Conservatives) , Stafford Cripps (Unionist Labour)

    1932-1937: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Deal Conservative leading National Government with New Party and National Liberal participation)[5]
    Def. 1932: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Arthur Henderson (National Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1937-1947: Thomas Edward Lawrence (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)
    Def. 1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Stafford Cripps (Socialist-Labour Popular Front)
    1947-1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party-National Liberal National Government)[6]
    1948: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess Londonderry (New Empire Party)
    1948-1949: Leo Amery (Independent Conservative leading National Reconstruction Government with National Conservatives-National Labourites-New Liberals and Moderate Socialists)[7]
    1949-1959: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative-Imperial Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1949: Herbert Morrison (Labour) , Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Ernest Bevin (Socialist), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)
    1959: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour) , Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Ernest Bevin (Socialist), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)

    1959-1964: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour-Socialist Coalition)
    Def. 1959: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative), Anthony Eden (Imperial Conservative),Jo Grimond (Liberal), Megan Lloyd-George (National Liberal), Eric Blair (New Labour)
    1964-1966: Hugh Gaitskell (Socialist Labour)
    Def. 1964: Richard Austen Butler (National Conservative), Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative), Keith Joseph (anti-interventionist Conservatives), Jo Grimond (United Liberal), Anthony Crosland (New Labour)
    1966-1969: James Callaghan (Socialist Labour)
    1969-1970: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative-National Conservative-Democratic Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1969: James Callaghan (Socialist Labour), Anthony Crosland (New Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (United Liberal)
    1970-1971: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative-National Conservative Minority Coalition with United Liberal Supply and Confidence)
    1971-1976: George Brown (Socialist Labour)
    Def. 1971: Harold Macmillan (Imperial Conservative), Iain Macleod (National Conservative) , Jeremy Thorpe (United Liberal), Anthony Crosland (New Labour), Enoch Powell (Democratic Conservative)
    1976: Anthony Crosland (New Labour-Internationalist Conservative-United Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1976: Edward Heath (National Conservative), Enoch Powell (Democratic Conservative), Anthony Benn (Socialist Labour), Imperial Conservative Rebels

    1976-1982: David Owen (New Labour-International Conservative-United Liberal Coalition)
    Def. 1981: Michael Heseltine (National and Imperial Conservative), Norman Tebbit (Democratic Conservative), Michael Foot (Socialist Labour), Roy Jenkins (Social Democratic Labour Rebels)
    1982-1991: David Owen (New Labour leader of The Social National Government featuring New Labour, Internationalist Conservatives, Social Democrats and Social Democratic Liberals)
    Def. 1986: Douglas Hurd (National and Imperial Conservative), Norman Tebbit (Democratic Conservative), Denis Healey (Socialist Labour), Alan Sked (Liberal)
    1991-1992: Ken Clarke (National and Commonwealth Conservative-Democratic Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1991: David Owen (New Labour), Neil Kinnock (Socialist Labour), Tony Blair (Internationalist Party), John Smith (Social Democrat), Alan Sked (Liberal), Paddy Ashdown (Social Democratic Liberal)
    1992-1996: Michael Portillo (National Democratic and Commonwealth)
    1996-2000: Margaret Becket (Progressive)
    Def. 1996: Michael Portillo (National Demlcratic and Commonwealth), Vince Cable (Liberal), Robin Cooke (Socialist Labour), Tony Blair (Internationalist)


    [1] Asquith fell because of internal party divisions, and in the end his glorious war time premiership was taken over by Lloyd George. Asquith would remain as Leader of the Opposition until well after the war's 1919 end, having been thrown out of government by the Tory supported betrayal.
    [2] In 1924 the National Liberals collapsed, with many re-joining the old Liberal Party out of fear that the unpopularity of the war-time coalition (of which the government was a continuation), for the increasingly unfavourable peace and loss of Ireland, would mean they lost their seats. The government collapsed, but no new government could be formed.
    [3] The General Strike's support by Labour MPs lead to the Liberals breaking away out of solidarity against the Socialist Revolutionaries sin the strike, who were joined by many World War One veterans dissatisfied with how the government had handled the war and its aftermath. MacDonald led a brief minority government, before a vote of no confidence was called, which he lost.
    [4] Baldwin formed a National Government to "Rebuild Britain", and this coalition was maintained going into the 1929 Great Depression. He was forced to abandon the Lloyd George National Liberal's as the one condition for the mainstream party joining his coalition, a grave insult which would inform the party's lurch towards corporatism. Whilst an Interventionist course was pursued, young Junior Treasury Minister Oswald Mosely believed that a more interventionist course was needed. He stressed a Corporatist policy of the government, public, and major business cooperating to recover the economy, and the strength of the British Empire. Whilst rejected by the National Government, young Tory Radical T.E. Lawrence supported the measures and, when Mosely and his supporters fled to the opposition benches, Lawrence and his "New Deal Tories" followed, with the two entering into an alliance at the 1931 General Election to regain Baldwin his early large majority.
    [5] 1932 saw one of the most bitterly fought elections in British history, with the "New Deal Alliance" (The New Deal Tories, New Party and National Liberals) forming alongside the National Government (The Conservative, Liberal and National Labour Parties) and the much closer knit "Socialist-Labour Popular Front". Essentially the election was fought between three principles Corporatism-"soft" Interventionism-Socialism. In the end, by a slim majority, Corporatism won, and the hugely popular war-hero Thomas "Tom" Lawrence became Prime Minister. The new National Government (With Mosely as Chancellor and the ageing Lloyd George as Home Secretary) set out a "New Deal for Britain" to save her economy and her empire.
    [6] After Lawrence and Mosely's assassinations the Foreign Secretary, a New Deal Tory, took over the government. He broke the coalition, and then was asked to step down by the King after the war was over and peace negotiated. Seeing the writing on the wall the Marquess did as ordered, and a National Reconstruction government was established, without the three "New" Parties.
    [7] Amery, father of a minor minister in the corporatist war government, was one of a few pro-war Tories who had not joined Lawrence's New Deal, and was trusted by everyone to run the country after the deposition. He quickly rebuilt Britain, but notably declined to implement a proportional representation system in the hopes the parties would coalesce into two moderate options.
     
  17. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    The deaths of Churchill and Attlee, and the Khaki Election of '45

    I wanted to explore the idea of electoral coalitions dominating British politics after the War... not sure about it yet, but I may do more.

    1940-1945: Winston Churchill (Conservative leading Wartime National Government) *
    1945-1945: Anthony Eden (Conservative leading Wartime National Government)

    1950-1954: Anthony Eden (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-Labour-National Liberal-Liberal)) [1]
    Def. 1950: Richard Acland (Common Wealth), Willie Gallacher (Communist)
    1954-1956: Anthony Eden (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-National Liberal-Liberal)) [2]
    Def. 1954: Richard Acland (Popular Front (Common Wealth-Communist-Social Credit-Minor Socialist Parties)), Aneurin Bevan (Labour)
    1956-1957: Gwilym Lloyd-George (National Liberal leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-National Liberal-Liberal))[3]
    1957-1965: Richard Austen Butler (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-National Liberal-Liberal))

    Def. 1959: Anthony Greenwood (Popular Front (Common Wealth-Anti-National-Labour-Communist-Social Credit-Minor Socialist Parties)), A.K. Chesterton (British Union)
    Def. 1964: Harold Wilson (Popular Front (Common Wealth-Anti-National-Labour-Communist-Social Credit-Minor Socialist Parties)), A.K. Chesterton (British Union)
    1965-1970: Harold Macmillan (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-National Liberal-Liberal))[4]
    1970-1975: James Callaghan (Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth-Social Credit-Communist-Minor Socialist Parties))[5]
    Def. 1970: Harold Macmillan (Conservative), John Scott Maclay (National Liberal), Roy Jenkins (National Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), John Bean (British Union)

    1975-1979: Reginald Maudling (Conservative leading the National Alliance (Conservative-Liberal and National-National Labour)) [6]
    Def. 1975: James Callaghan (Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth-Social Credit-Communist-Minor Socialist Parties), John Tyndall (British Union), Barbara Castle (Women's Socialist Party)

    1979-1983: Reginald Maudling (National Alliance)
    Def. 1979: Peter Shore (Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth-Social Credit-Communist-Minor Socialist Parties), Keith Joseph (Conservative), John Tyndall (British Union), Barbara Castle (Women's Socialist Party)
    1983-1984: Michael Foot (Anti-EEC Coalition(Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth-Social Credit-Communist-Minor Socialist Parties))-Conservative-Women's Solidarity)) [7]
    Def. 1983: Reginald Maudling (National Alliance), John O'Brien (British Union)
    1984-1993: Douglas Hurd (National Alliance)
    Def. 1993: John Major (Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth-Social Credit)), Michael Howard (Conservative), Eric Hobsbawm (Communist), Patrick Harrington (British Union)
    1993-1997: Douglas Hurd (National Alliance-Conservative Coalition)
    Def. 1993: Robin Cooke (Popular Front (Socialist Labour-Common Wealth)), Frank Field (Social Credit), Peter Mandelson (Communist), Patrick Harrington (British Union)
    1993-1998: Chris Patten (National Alliance-Conservative Coalition)
    1998-2001: Chris Patten (National Alliance-Socialist Labour-Conservative-Common Wealth)


    * Died in Office.

    [1] The Election of 1954 came a year earlier than expected, with Eden's majority greatly reduced when Aneurin Bevan and the "Anti Coalition" Labour MPs crossed the floor into opposition. Fortunately for Eden, most of the Labour party stayed and the "coupon" system would protect the National Government's majority.

    [2] Labour were summarily punished in the election of 1954, with her role in the National Government greatly reduced as Hugh Gaitskell (a less respected figure due to his flamboyant lifestyle in austere times) became leader. Eden eventually resigned over the "Suez Fiasco" when the US refused to support the Anglo-Egyptian-French attempt to seize the Sinai peninsula from Socialist Israel.
    [3] Initially purely an interim leader, Lloyd-George stayed on longer than expected due to his immense popularity, but resigned due to a health scare.
    [4] Seen as "an Old Man in a hurry", Harold Macmillan was an uncharismatic and unpopular figure - when he called a General Election the country's apathy towards Macmillan (and dislike of his and Butler's Liberal Reforms) led to a narrow Popular Front Victory.
    [5] The Socially Conservative but Economically Left-wing Popular Front won the General Election by a narrow margin, and their divided and reactionary rule of the country over five years lost them the election of '75.
    [6] Maudling reorganised the former National Government forces into the "National Alliance" electoral group to counter the Popular Front's efforts and continue the Coupon System. The reunification of the two Liberal Parties also helped give the Alliance an image of being a group of compromise and reunion. Whilst the Popular Front had reversed the Liberal Reforms of 1964-1970 these were largely reinstituted by Maudling. The last year of his premiership, however, saw the social Conservatives and monetarists leave the party in disgust, taking much of the Tory Party with them. A new political era would follow... The end of the Coalition Era had come.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2016
  18. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Khaki Election '45

    1945-1949: Winston Churchill (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-Labour-Liberal-Independent Nationals))

    Def. 1945: Herbert Morrison (Labour), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Richard Acland (Commonwealth), Harry Politt (Communist), John Hargrave (Social Credit)
    1949-1954: Winston Churchill (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-Liberal-Independent Nationals))
    Def. 1949: Herbert Morrison (National Labour), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Richard Acland (Alliance (Common Wealth-Social Credit), Aneurin Bevan (Anti-Coalition Labour), Willie Gallacher (Communist)

    1954-1960: Anthony Eden (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-Liberal-Independent Nationals))
    Def. 1954: Richard Acland (Alliance (Common Wealth-Social Credit), Hugh Gaistkell (National Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal), Arthur Greenwood (Anti-Coalition Labour), Willie Gallacher (Communist)
    Def. 1958: Tom Driberg (Alliance (Common Wealth-Social Credit), Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Harold Wilson (Anti-Coalition Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Rajani Dutt (Communist)
    1960-1969: Richard Butler (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-Liberal-Independent Nationals))
    Def. 1964: C.J. Hunt (Alliance (Social Credit-Common Wealth), Anthony Greenwood (Socialist Labour), George Brown (National Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Rajani Dutt (Communist)
    Def. 1968: Frank Cousins (Alliance of Creditists and Collectivists), Michael Foot (Socialist Labour), James Callaghan (National Labour), John Pardoe (Liberal), John Gollan (Communist)

    1969-1970: Frank Cousins (Alliance Minority Government)
    Def. 1969: Richard Butler (Conservative), Michael Foot (Socialist Labour), James Callaghan (National Labour), John Pardoe (Liberal), John Gollan (pro-Soviet Communists), Eric Hosbawm (Gramscian Communists)
    1970-1980: Ian Gilmour (Conservative)
    Def. 1970: Frank Cousins (Alliance), Tony Crosland (United Labour (Socialist Labour-National Labour)), David Steel (Liberal), John Gollan (pro-Soviet Communists), Eric Hosbawm (Gramscian Communists)
    1980-1988: Neil Kinnock (Alliance leading Popular Front (Alliance-Labour Joint Whip-International Communist-Social Democratic Liberals-Independent Progressives and Socialists))
     
  19. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    Mirror Mirror

    1945-1951: Winston Churchill (Conservative)
    1951-1955: Clement Attlee (Labour)
    1955-1964: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
    1964-1965: Alec Douglas Home (Conservative)
    1965-1970: Edward Heath (Conservative)
    1970-1974: Harold Wilson (Labour)
    1974-1974: Edward Heath (Conservative Minority Government)

    1974-1979: Edward Heath (Conservative)
    1979-1982: James Callaghan (Labour)
    1982-1984: Michael Foot (Labour)
    1984-1997: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
    1997-2000: John Major (Conservative)
    2000-2004: William Hague (Conservative)
    2005-2010: Michael Howard (Conservative)
    2010-2015: Gordon Brown (Labour-Liberal Democrat Coalition)
    2015-2015: Ed Miliband (Labour-Liberal Democrat Coalition)
    2015-2020: Ed Miliband (Labour)
     
  20. Cevolian *Brooks Newmark Intensifies*

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Location:
    The North
    1908-1916: Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
    1916-1918: David Lloyd George (Coalition Liberal leading Wartime National Government (Conservative-Coalition Liberal))
    1918-1922: David Lloyd George (Conservative-Coalition Liberal Coalition)
    1922-1925: John Clynes (Labour-Liberal Coalition)
    1925-1925: John Clynes (Labour Minority)
    1925-1926: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative)
    1926-1926: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Emergency Government (Conservative-Labour-Liberal))
    1926-1926:
    Winston Churchill (Conservative leading National Emergency Government (Conservative-Labour-Liberal))
    1926-1927: Ramsay Macdonald (Labour Minority)

    1927-1929: Ramsay Macdonald (Labour)
    1929-1931: Ramsay Macdonald (Labour leading National Government (Labour-Conservative-Liberal))
    1931-1934: Ramsay Macdonald (Labour leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-Liberal)
    1934-1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative leading National Government (Conservative-National Labour-Liberal)

    1937-1940: Thomas Lawrence (New Deal Conservative leading National Government (New Party-New Deal Conservatives-National Liberal))
    1940-1940: Thomas Lawrence (New Empire League leading National Government (New Empire League-National Conservatives-National Liberal-Commonwealth Labour)
    1940-1947: Thomas Lawrence (New Empire League leading Wartime National Government (New Empire League-National Conservatives-National Liberal-Commonwealth Labour)
    1947-1947: Charles Vane Tempest Stewart, 3rd Marquess Londonderry (New Empire League leading Wartime National Government (New Empire League-National Conservatives-National Liberal-Commonwealth Labour)
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2016