Building an Earth-like World Mk II

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I'd like to suggest gigantopithecus fulfilling a panda-like niche.

Although that said, I can't see any bamboo forest on the map, despite it being included in the key.

That's very strange seen as I was the one who added it :eek: in any case, I added some to the southeastern continent, which I imagine has an Asian flora/fauna in the south.

8ovO5ea.png


I'll leave the languages mostly to you guys. It's not my expertise. But I think the Dinosaurs should speak in a series of clicks and hisses, much like dolphins. Or maybe bird-like songs would be better? I'll research this more throughly.
 

Awesome contribution, Thanksforallthefish.

I'm deeply interested in the fourwings, as I always loved those dinosaurs. So, summarizing, we have a living Changyuraptor? Awesome.

I added some to the southeastern continent, which I imagine has an Asian flora/fauna in the south.

I thought we had put an American ecosystem in that continent, well, at least in relation to agricultural plants, at least according to what Pipochubs1999 stated.

I'd like to suggest gigantopithecus fulfilling a panda-like niche.

I like the idea but in the end it's in a very endangered position in relation to two intelligent, predatory species, thinking about what happened to the megafauna in our world. Perhaps today it's like the Dzungarian Horse.

I was thinking, with all of these animalsmodern day animals, e.i. birds, we have developed that have part of their evolutionary lineage descendants alive as opposed to Earth I was thinking if I could add an entry for something similar to the pakicetus (land ancestor to whales) that still retained an amphibious lifestyle. I also desired to add to the tropical areas a type of hyper-dense forest.
 
I figured, why not give it a chance and write it.

Seadogs:


Pakicetus_BW.jpg

Pakicetus, the ancestor to both modern dolphins and whales and seadogs.


The seadogs are a common sight, vastly extended over different ecosystems some very new; their biology has given them advantages over many of the original inhabitants of those lands in which they inhabit.

To the untrained eye these animals look like a mixture of mustelids and common dogs, however, they possess characteristics that definitively separate them from both groups. It isn’t necessary to be a zoologist to notice the adaptations that define the species. First, the head of the animals doesn’t resemble a canid skull, being considerably elongated behind the eyes and much more conical in shape, with an elongated snout that extends beyond what would be the end of the “cone”. Their ears are triangular and small, canid in appearance, are high upon their heads, possessing muscles adapted to close them when contracted or being outside of the water when the animal swims calmly. On a related note, many species have a rather strange feature for non-natives, the presence of three or four nostrils. While all species have two in the front of their skulls some have two more nostrils or a crescent one in their foreheads. Present or not, most of the species feature a semblance of this trait, this is due to that the second pair of nostrils is a prolongation of the first one, an incision in the bone or at least at major reduction in the density and thickness that runs over the forehead is a witness to this. The incision is covered by flesh and cartilage in most species, making it invisible and effectively inexistent for practical purposes.

In spite of all of this, perhaps the tails of the seadogs are their most notorious feature. There is consensus among zoologists that the tail is the defining characteristic that allowed these mammals to adapt to their amphibious lifestyle. It was adapted primarily to swim and in some species for balance, on dry land. It is a thick appendage, flattened and widening near the end with varying lengths among species; the tiny meandering seadog holding the longest in relation to body size, at an amazing 65%, however, such an extreme is uncommon as it makes the life outside of the water severely harder.

The legs of the seadogs are unique among the mammals. They are digitigrades that possess specialized tarsal bones, especially the calcaneus and the talus, for the anchoring of powerful abductor muscles. These are far stronger in relation to body size than in canids. In relation to the rest of the limb, the metatarsals of the forelegs in the seadogs are elongated and graceful, being able to separate from one another a considerable amount. This particular and unique ability directly hints to the most primitive of the frontal fins found in cetaceans. The bones of the fingers share a similar adaptation and functionality; nonetheless, the tendons and muscles joining them to the rest of the body are far more than well adapted to catching prey and running on dry land. In conclusion, all of this to swim without compromising their performance as land predators.

Their appearance is completed with the presence of short, semi-impermeable fur, thanks to the action of glandules beneath certain parts of the skin, mainly behind the neck.

Why is it so that people associate them with mustelids then? Despite the obvious differences it is often said that both groups twist similarly underwater, although their methods of swimming are different. The fur is also similar to the view even if the grand majority of the species of seadogs have patches of longer hair.

Seadogs can venture far into the sea in search for prey and swim continuously for as long as they remain awake, in normal circumstances. They can also hunt and fish in the areas along the deltas of rivers, including the delta itself. It is one of the most if not their most preferred habitat. Nevertheless, should the need arise or depending on the species, these mammals can venture along the whole extension of a river.

On dry land the story is no different; while preferring to stay close to large bodies of water, seadogs are tremendously effective predators, capable of mimicking dogs in most accounts. The most notable of these abilities is their extraordinary resistance to exhaustion. Having transitioned from water to earth, these mammals have no problem in sustaining a chase as long as they are awake, an ability only equaled by the canids.

Seadogs hunt in packs in the wild while on bodies of water they are more independent if not completely so.

As it has been explained their main biology seems rather paradoxical in relation to their behaviour but this is not the case. This is due to a common misconception about evolution, because they aren’t the evolutionary ancestors to dolphins and whales but rather share the same common ancestors, the very first species of the line of the archaeoceti, the pakicetidae, and have adapted to different ecological niche.

Seadogs aren’t part of the family pakicetidae; they differ in many of characteristics that define this group such as the size of the pectoral muscles, larger in seadogs, and the articulation of the vertebrae which is much more flexible allowing a more perfected undulatory swimming. As it was stated before the structure of their limbs is unique allowing both sustained running and paddling when swimming.

The habitats of the seadogs include both coast and along the extension of rivers. They secure a territory on land around this places which in case of scarcity can be extended enough inland to provide sustenance. Some animals are more prone to this behaviour, mainly solitary sexually mature males, nonetheless, seadogs have extended far along the shores of several continents, resisting the changing environments and adapting to become different species.

It hadn’t been possible to domesticate most of the species until very recently and only some in limited areas.

Domesticated seadogs while extremely faithful are tremendously territorial and protective against strangers. Most are never capable of relating, or even standing more than a handful of known people.
 
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Excellent post Fox-Fire!!

I'm thinking the alternate history of cetaceans might be interesting: this world is dominated by water after all. I'll see what can I do.

About the American ecosystem in the southern continent, I thought that the northern part was to be the origin of humans (thus having a roughly African fauna/flora). So I thought the south would be a more Asian place, separated by the desert. Anybody agrees? In any case, we should list all the proposals and reach a consensus.
 
How about humans evolving in an environment similar to the Americas instead of Africa. It sounds weird, but this world isn't exactly earth. Also have some other sapient species proposals, Amphibian men, Antmen, and Serpent men. Guess where I got these ideas.
 
I really like the ant-men idea. But could they still be tiny ant sized? I mean, there's more oxygen in the atmosphere so they could be like rat sized actually.
 
How about humans evolving in an environment similar to the Americas instead of Africa. It sounds weird, but this world isn't exactly earth. Also have some other sapient species proposals, Amphibian men, Antmen, and Serpent men. Guess where I got these ideas.
D&D? No seriously, do tell, I'm always looking for worldbuilding inspiration :D

I'm all for adding more races, but let's not make them *something*-men, let's get creative! For example, an social insect race like ants or bees probably would be intelligent in the sense that a colony would be intelligent, and not each individual ant. It would be very interesting and a very alien intelligence too. They probably wouldn't see individual humans as sentient (neither would we consider them as such) and they could make massive ecological damage as colonies use the surrounding terrain (much like our agriculture but more intensive)

My proposals are:

-An amphibian race in the northern hemisphere: I was thinking either Otters (very relatable) or Octopuses (very alien). Or maybe the Packicetus creatures of Fox-fire?
-Some kind of gecko jungle people. Lives in trees, very adaptable.
-Wooly mammoths? I don't think that's ever done before.

But keep in mind that for each race we add, we must create a culture and at least some sort of langauge... so we better add them as full ideas instead of scatterbrained concepts.

As for humans evolving in an American enviroment, are we talking about a Great Plains enviroment or more like the Pampas? We could couple it with an alternate evolution of apes while we're at it.

And HORSES ARE IMPORTANT GUYS. We should place them wisely. I just had the image of primitive *gauchos* so...

As for Dinosaurs, I read at bit and it seems that most dinosaurs weren't capable of vocalization (at least, as we know it). Apparently they relied on visual cues to communicate. I propose we handwave it a little, saying that the evolution of a Syrinx and complex mating calls and communication springed dinosaur evolution. After all, humans truly developed much of our culture and intelligences thanks to language.

So I'm imagining dinosaur language to be composed of very complex songs like birds: they probably would sound somewhat beautiful to humans, with some clicks and screeches. And of course a very complex body language with dances. And also very noise like modern birds; this could make early humans get clues that they talk in a language and interest them in translate them. It would be difficult for humans to replicate their language: whistling would tire people fast (but maybe a special profession of whistlers could work) and we would lack the body language. For dinosauroids... well maybe it would work, just look at parrots...

I'll have to investigate more, but it sounds good for a guideline. There would be very interesting evolutive parallels and discordances. I'll leave you with a reconstruction of Deinonychus, which really fits my vision of Fangbirds (obviously it lacks longer flight feathers:)
the-noble-savage.jpg


The original is here, and the artist is awesome. She really captures feathered dinosaurs as if they were alive.
 
Excellent post Fox-Fire!!
Thank you, and coming from from you with yours being always awesome :D

I'm thinking the alternate history of cetaceans might be interesting: this world is dominated by water after all. I'll see what can I do.
Are we going to see basilosaurus and such or just more intermediate species?

About the American ecosystem in the southern continent, I thought that the northern part was to be the origin of humans (thus having a roughly African fauna/flora). So I thought the south would be a more Asian place, separated by the desert. Anybody agrees? In any case, we should list all the proposals and reach a consensus.
I agree with this proposal. It make sense to have the humans evolving in an African ecosystem but I also wanted to see an American ecosystem on this continent.

And HORSES ARE IMPORTANT GUYS. We should place them wisely.
I think we should place them in the same continent as the humans, they wouldn't have evolved in the same continent as the dinosauroids and plainclaws and in the jungles it's just impossible. If we desire to place them not so close to the humans' first cradle we should put them on the other side of the great lake.

But keep in mind that for each race we add, we must create a culture and at least some sort of langauge... so we better add them as full ideas instead of scatterbrained concepts.
I created a family of languages a few posts back if someone wants to use them. They are thought as exonyms of words in the other language, they aren't meant to BE part of that same language.

While we are at creating languages and thinking about dinosauroid vocalization I think we should also consider the anatomical changes the dinosauraoids have experienced that made the different from the cousins.

I think a chief feature should be forelimbs more focused on manipulations of objects, I propose that dinosauroids have something similar to pamprodactyl feet in place of hands. The characteristic I desire to use is the ability to have two opposable fingers.

Maybe dinosauroids could have some special feathers on their heads similar to cockatoos which they can use to complement verbal language.

Beautiful deinonychus by the way.

Ah, something to complement your post back in page 18 about cloud forests:

The hyper-density Tropical Rainforests:

dionpurple-300x292.jpg

As we descend light reflected form the plants is less, therefore the amount that is acquired by other is even smaller producing plants more efficient in scraping even the tiniest amounts of light that reach them, some of them completely outside the visible spectrum. This creates plants with dark leaves.


Amensalism, a relatively unknown word. An ecological relationship. Amensalism, while not nearly as spectacular as the fight for life found in predation nor apparently producing such amazing adapted traits as competition, is a force of biological interaction.

Deep, deep inside the jungles of the equatorial continents exists a region with a type of ecosystem unparalleled by any on the planet. They are not biome on themselves, just a subclass of tropical rainforest, the hyper-density rainforests.

As it is implied by its name what distinguishes this type of jungle it’s the enormous density of species and individuals concentrated by area; the highest in the planet excepting the great coral reefs.

These jungles present us with a spectacular sight, immediately drawing our attention towards them. It is the colourful display of leaves they have what separates them form the rest of the tropical rainforests. This is when amensalism comes into play. As the trees compete for light their coups go higher and higher into the skies, trying to surpass their neighbours they also overshadow smaller plant life, which has never been able to reach that far into the skies. The solution that nature has granted this disfavoured plants is simple, to run parallel instead of against. As taller plant life feeds on some types of light and reflects others, some of it reaches the lower levels; nevertheless, this isn’t the original multiple-spectrum light. Therefore plants don’t have the same pigmentation as their larger cousins. Different pigmentation in turn means different coloured leaves.
On Earth, less than two per cent of the light reaches the soil of a tropical rainforest, in planet name in hyper-density tropical rainforests this number approaches zero.

On one hand, amensalism has created the appearance of these jungles, given them character and definition; however, it is competition that has given shape to them. In the race for light plants can be as vicious and spectacular as a plainclaw bringing down its prey. Lianas creep along the trunks of trees only to extend past them, between them, enormous distances sometimes with concentrations so dense that it creates a ground for the growth of other plants above them and can supplant the real soil in the eyes of the inexperienced. And they do, most of the time the real ground is never exposed. Flowers blossom in all the colours of the spectrum against the backdrop of the multi-coloured jungle, hoping to attract the largest possible number of the uncountable that inhabit the rainforest, some of them even outside the human visible spectrum. The trees reach the highest heights of the continent on these places. Enough number of plants parasite others to make a common ecosystem just themselves. Some animals don’t see the light of the day in weeks. Many wonders are in this patches of land, however, almost all species contained within them are the same that inhabit the rest of the tropical rainforest, these lands being just the most extreme manifestation.
 
Thank you, and coming from from you with yours being always awesome :D

Are we going to see basilosaurus and such or just more intermediate species?

I agree with this proposal. It make sense to have the humans evolving in an African ecosystem but I also wanted to see an American ecosystem on this continent.

I think we should place them in the same continent as the humans, they wouldn't have evolved in the same continent as the dinosauroids and plainclaws and in the jungles it's just impossible. If we desire to place them not so close to the humans' first cradle we should put them on the other side of the great lake.

I created a family of languages a few posts back if someone wants to use them. They are thought as exonyms of words in the other language, they aren't meant to BE part of that same language.

While we are at creating languages and thinking about dinosauroid vocalization I think we should also consider the anatomical changes the dinosauraoids have experienced that made the different from the cousins.

I think a chief feature should be forelimbs more focused on manipulations of objects, I propose that dinosauroids have something similar to pamprodactyl feet in place of hands. The characteristic I desire to use is the ability to have two opposable fingers.

Maybe dinosauroids could have some special feathers on their heads similar to cockatoos which they can use to complement verbal language.

Beautiful deinonychus by the way.

Ah, something to complement your post back in page 18 about cloud forests:

The hyper-density Tropical Rainforests:

dionpurple-300x292.jpg

As we descend light reflected form the plants is less, therefore the amount that is acquired by other is even smaller producing plants more efficient in scraping even the tiniest amounts of light that reach them, some of them completely outside the visible spectrum. This creates plants with dark leaves.


Amensalism, a relatively unknown word. An ecological relationship. Amensalism, while not nearly as spectacular as the fight for life found in predation nor apparently producing such amazing adapted traits as competition, is a force of biological interaction.

Deep, deep inside the jungles of the equatorial continents exists a region with a type of ecosystem unparalleled by any on the planet. They are not biome on themselves, just a subclass of tropical rainforest, the hyper-density rainforests.

As it is implied by its name what distinguishes this type of jungle it’s the enormous density of species and individuals concentrated by area; the highest in the planet excepting the great coral reefs.

These jungles present us with a spectacular sight, immediately drawing our attention towards them. It is the colourful display of leaves they have what separates them form the rest of the tropical rainforests. This is when amensalism comes into play. As the trees compete for light their coups go higher and higher into the skies, trying to surpass their neighbours they also overshadow smaller plant life, which has never been able to reach that far into the skies. The solution that nature has granted this disfavoured plants is simple, to run parallel instead of against. As taller plant life feeds on some types of light and reflects others, some of it reaches the lower levels; nevertheless, this isn’t the original multiple-spectrum light. Therefore plants don’t have the same pigmentation as their larger cousins. Different pigmentation in turn means different coloured leaves.
On Earth, less than two per cent of the light reaches the soil of a tropical rainforest, in planet name in hyper-density tropical rainforests this number approaches zero.

On one hand, amensalism has created the appearance of these jungles, given them character and definition; however, it is competition that has given shape to them. In the race for light plants can be as vicious and spectacular as a plainclaw bringing down its prey. Lianas creep along the trunks of trees only to extend past them, between them, enormous distances sometimes with concentrations so dense that it creates a ground for the growth of other plants above them and can supplant the real soil in the eyes of the inexperienced. And they do, most of the time the real ground is never exposed. Flowers blossom in all the colours of the spectrum against the backdrop of the multi-coloured jungle, hoping to attract the largest possible number of the uncountable that inhabit the rainforest, some of them even outside the human visible spectrum. The trees reach the highest heights of the continent on these places. Enough number of plants parasite others to make a common ecosystem just themselves. Some animals don’t see the light of the day in weeks. Many wonders are in this patches of land, however, almost all species contained within them are the same that inhabit the rest of the tropical rainforest, these lands being just the most extreme manifestation.

Wow cool post.
 
I'm needed in proto-languages ?

Proto-Toroq

Vowels:

i ĩ u ũ /i in u un/
e̞ ẽ̞ o̞ õ̞ /e en o on/
a ã ɒ ɒ̃ /a an å ån/

Consonants:

p t ʈ k q ʔ /p t ṭ k q '/
tʼ ʈʼ kʼ qʼ /t' ṭ' k' q'/
t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ʃ ʈ͡ʂ /ts tl tš ṭṣ/
t͡sʼ t͡ɬʼ t͡ʃʼ ʈ͡ʂʼ /ts' tl' tš' ṭṣ'/
ɸ s θ̠ ɬ ʃ ʂ x~χ h /f s θ l š ṣ ḥ h/
β z ð̠ ɮ ʒ ʐ ɣ~ʁ /v z ð ł ž ẓ x/
m n ɳ ŋ~ɴ /m n ṇ ŋ/
ɾ ɽ r ɽ͡r /r ṛ rr ṛṛ/
j w /y w/

Syllable structure: CV(C)

Stress accent: high pitch on penultimate syllable.

Type: Agglutinative-Fusional
Main alignment: Nominative-Accusative
Ditransitive alignment: Secundative

Tense: Past remote, Past proper, Present.
Aspect: Imperfective, Iterative, Perfective
Voice: Active, Passive, Causative, Causative-Passive
Mood: Indicative, Imperative, Hortative, Conditional
Preverb: towards, away from, inside, outside (preffixed)

Verb structure: Preverb + Root + Root's extension + Voice + Tense + Aspect + Subject + Mood

Number: Singular, Plural (optional for inanimates)
Gender: Animate-Inanimate distinction (suffixed)
Cases: Nominative, Accusative, Instrumental, Benefactive, Allative, Ablative, Locative, Abessive (suffixed)
Definiteness: Definite proper, Definite distant (proclytical)

Noun structure: Definiteness + Number + Root + Root's extension + Gender + Possession + Case
 
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Proto-Kwardic

Vowels:

iː uː
eː oː
ɔː


i u
e o
ɔ
a

Consonants:

m n ŋ
pʰ tʰ kʰ kʷʰ
p t k kʷ
b d g gʷ
t͡sʰ t͡ʃʰ
t͡s t͡ʃ
d͡z d͡ʒ
s ʃ x xʷ h
r l
j w

Syllable structure: (C)V(C)(C)
 
Is anyone still here? I've randomly found this thread and it has really caught my attention. I love how detailed you guys made it so far. Wouldn't it be worth it to revisit it again?
 
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