Breaking News - A News Timeline

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Ying Blanc, Jun 21, 2018.

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  1. Threadmarks: Chapter 1 - Prologue

    Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Yorkshire. UK
    Prologue

    Hello and welcome! This is my first proper timeline covering an actual narrative, and it is my first timeline in general in 3 or 4 years. I'm highly confident that I've matured and improved over those years to make a riveting, and diverse story. The narrative of this timeline comes from the creation of an early competitor to the BBC decades before ITV came to be. So sit back, and I hope you enjoy my first foray into an actual narrative timeline.

    Breaking News – Chapter 1
    A News Timeline by Aces California


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    Edward Lloyd – Founder of the Daily Chronicle

    Before the 1870s, Edward Lloyd; the third son of an impoverish family, always had ambitions of publishing, including his self-hated fictional short stories published between the 1830s and the 1850s.

    After many attempts at self-publishing; penny dreadfuls, clear to day plagiarism, and tiny publications with equally tiny circulation, in 1876, Edward bought out the local Clerkenwell News and London Daily Chronicle newspaper for a total of over £180,000. Remodelled to become a national newspaper and renamed to the Daily Chronicle, it entered London's circulation the following year without warning. Valued initially for it's content from the beginning, Lloyd's steadfast belief in objective reporting of facts, unadorned by comment or speculation, led to the paper growing in popularity, and leading the way in news print; eventually hiring special correspondents for specific stories and reporting on news from the wide colonies of the British Empire.

    Come the 1890s, the Daily Chronicle under Edward Lloyd and his editor Robert Boyle, a prominent Irish journalist, had grew in reputation becoming arguably the best selling daily newspaper in the country. However, at the front end of 1890 the newspaper was struck by two huge losses. In February, the newspaper lost it's editor, Robert Boyle, and in April it was Edward Lloyd's time. Towards the end of his life, Edward called upon his son, Frank Lloyd, to become the owner of the newspaper on his death. when Edward Lloyd's passing finally arrived at 75 years old, Frank became the new owner of the Daily Chronicle. The new editor, Alfred Fletcher, hired before Edward's death, took the inexperienced son of his deceased boss under his wing. Since then, multiple editors have passed until the story picks up again; the newspaper being passed from Fletcher to Henry Massingham, and William Fletcher, before William Fletcher passed the newspaper down to Robert Donald. Robert was an editor who stood for everything the Lloyd family stood for; thoughtful, principled, and objective news, and championing of the warrants of editorial independence. A perfect fit for the newspaper.

    With the newspaper entering into the new century with a great and stable reputation, and with Frank Lloyd still owning the newspaper, Robert Donald editing it, business continued to progress quickly, until a series of misunderstandings would place the paper, Robert, and Frank against the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in one of the most turbulent times for the country.

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  2. historybuff Well-Known Member

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    You have my attention.
     
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  3. Threadmarks: Chapter 2 - Split of Politicians

    Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Thanks to everybody who read my first chapter, and to @CrazyGeorge and @historybuff for their contributions. I hope you all like how I am setting up the bulk of the story to come, there is 1 more prologue as is before it reaches the POD, but there may be small changes unrelated to the main story line that will be covered in the next chapter.

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    Chapter 2

    [​IMG]
    Herbert Henry Asquith at the dispatch box in the House of Commons

    1908, Herbert Henry Asquith, known popularly as H.H Asquith, began his role as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, following the resignation of Henry Campbell-Bannerman. Moving from one prestigious office from the Chancellor's office, to another in the Prime Minister's office, an equally prestigious office, H.H Asquith began his term unknowing of the events that would come in the world during his time, which will effect his premiership to the point that it would put a stop to it.

    The first rough patch for the Prime Minister of the time was a duo of elections in 1910, looking to sure up his government, the elections pushed the Liberals from being a majority party to a minority, a state of governance that Asquith would run until the Great War. When the Great War came around, Asquith entered the country into the war, and was at first applauded, but as time went on, and a coalition government was formed, the premiership of H.H Asquith became unsuccessful and unpopular to the press, people, and cabinet.

    The conflicts inside the government started when the Chancellor of the Exchequer and Minister of War David Lloyd George and other members of multiple parties including Lord Curzon, Lord Milner, Bonar Law, and Arthur Henderson formed the War Cabinet that would handle the war effort for the country. However, before it even began, H.H Asquith shut down the efforts and consequentially created a split between the Prime Minister, and David Lloyd George.

    This came to a head in 1916, with H.H Asquith being forced to resign from his premiership in 1916, ominously with David Lloyd George vacating his Chancellor's seat on the same day. Suspicions became warranted after the Chancellor of the Exchequer was invited to form a government by the members loyal to his faction in the Liberal Party, whilst those opposing became the Opposition bench in Parliamet.

    [​IMG]
    A young David Lloyd George in 1911, now Prime Minister

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    Robert Donald, the editor of the Daily Chronicle, under ownership of Frank Lloyd, the son of founder Edward Lloyd, came to back the new Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, with Robert becoming particularly close to the Prime Minister. David Lloyd George in return heavily supported the Daily Chronicle, being a fan of it's, and Robert's, impartial, objective coverage of the news. However, as David Lloyd George supported the newspaper, he was mistaken in thinking that they, and Robert, were uncritical supporters. This only being supported by the efforts Robert Donald agreed to to assist in distributing propaganda for the Great War.

    However, in the same year as the propaganda efforts, David Lloyd George would make a massive error in the relationship between Robert and himself, the same type that split H.H Asquith and his Chancellor of the Exchequer apart. The Prime Minister, armed with a backer in the form of Lord Leverhulme, aimed to buy the Daily Chronicle for it's £900,000 stated price by Robert. However, Lord Leverhulme pulled out from the deal, stating the cost being too high for him. So Lloyd George looked elsewhere.

    Lord Beaverbrook, the Conservative press baron with the Daily Express already under his hand was invited to meet with David Lloyd George. The Prime Minister asked after him distinctly, and after walking through the heavy wooden doors, he was met by the Prime Minister, offering a proposal to Lord Beaverbrook on matters of a certain newspaper.

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    Last edited: Jun 28, 2018
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  4. historybuff Well-Known Member

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    Keep it up when you can.
     
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  5. Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Historybuff, I'm tentatively looking at a Monday - Thursday release schedule :)
     
  6. historybuff Well-Known Member

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    Okay. Weird, when I saw the title, thought this would be a news headline format TL, not an alternate history for a Uk newspaper I haven't heard of before. Still, interesting so far.
     
  7. Threadmarks: Chapter 3 - Beginning of the End

    Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    I can see how the concept could be confused for that sort of format. And stick with me on this time, they'll be more than covering a newspaper! This is just the first moments of this timeline!

    I hope you all enjoy Chapter 3! And I'm going to be trying my best to actually come up with names for the Chapters at some point in the near future

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    Chapter 3

    Lord Beaverbrook, invited to the offices of David Lloyd George, was offered with a proposal straight from the Prime Minister himself, finance the Prime Minister's attempt to but the Daily Chronicle from the man who was a thorn in the Prime Minister's side currently, Robert Donald, the current Editor of the Daily Chronicle. Unknown to Lord Beaverbrook, the press baron who owned the likes of the Daily Express, this was the second attempt by the Prime Minister to buy the newspaper through a member of Parliament, after the previous attempt with Lord Leverhulme fell through.

    Discussing and arguing what would be in his interests if he were to finance the buy out of the Daily Chronicle, Lord Beaverbrook proposed the strongest and last deal of the long discussions on the table, with the support of the Lord for five years for David Lloyd George's minority government.

    On the other side of the deal for the Daily Chronicle, Robert Donald sat, nervously awaiting response from David Lloyd George, hoping that the sale of the newspaper would be shot down like before. So when the news arrived from David Lloyd George that he had a new financier, a Conservative financier even, and one who owns a direct competitor for the Daily Chronicle; for Robert Donald, to hand over the newspaper to that man, Lord Beaverbrook, and David Lloyd George, would be detestable. Donald had to fight back, attempt to fight back, in any way he can. He began late night calls on the day the news arrived in an attempt to form his own rival consortium to buy the newspaper for him...for his own set extortionate price of £900,000.

    Weeks to months went, with both parties tussling and fighting for ownership of the newspaper. Any growth in respectability and readership slowed as all workers were affected by the back and forth and uncertainty in the deal. But eventually, time just ran out. Both sides, without headway into their bids for months, pulled their bids away. Months of uncertainty and tensions had come to nothing, but at least it was a good nothing to Robert Donald, he kept his newspaper to himself, and defeated the Prime Minister and Government, leaving him with a head held high and moral even higher.

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    Soldiers living in the British Trenches in the Great War

    The dealings however, damaged the reputation on both sides, the impartial views of the newspaper by the general public was shifted aside, to the view that the newspaper was against the current Government, and the Liberals. On David Lloyd George's side, the underhanded nature of the Prime Minister on his side of the negotiation damaged his image, and damaged the reputation of the Prime Minister in a vital time during the fighting in the Great War.

    However, it was not the dealings that put the nail in the coffin against David Lloyd George's premiership.

    Starting in 1918, with a lie discovered concerning the Great War; the Prime Minister approached the Parliament, under fire from claims from members of Parliament that the promise of not reducing the numbers of British Troops facing the German forces in Europe was not being upheld. Lloyd George announced to the Parliament, and to the Press, who would then go on to tell the Great British Public, that there would be no reductions of British soldiers on the German front lines.

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    Portrait of Frederick Maurice found in the National Portrait Gallery of London

    However, a member of the Military had something else to say. Frederick Maurice, the General of Statistics on the Western Front in Europe approached a collection of newspapers, and leaked numbers, directly showing that the Prime Minister was lying. The Daily Chronicle was one of the newspapers leaked too, and ran with the story, the Prime Minister being targeted by a Robert Donald, still with fresh memories of the underhanded, swindling techniques of negotiation, that David Lloyd George was performing to get his paper.

    Public response was harsh, opinions of David Lloyd George collapsed, and opened up a vulnerable front that H.H Asquith, former leader and Prime Minister of the Liberal Party of the United Kingdom, capitalised on. The debate on 9 May, 1918, named after the man who started it all, Frederick Maurice began between the Prime Minister and his Coalition, and the Opposition of H.H Asquith and his Liberal Party.

    The Maurice Debate occurred with hours of debate and discussion between benches, culminating in a vote, which for David Lloyd George, was as good as a Vote of No Confidence. If he and his government lost this vote, he would go to the polls, to prove that support of his party was still strong, even after the events with the Daily Chronicle in 1917, with the Maurice Debate in 1918.

    [​IMG]
    A Political Cartoon from the Satirical Magazine Punch

    The vote ran on, and unbeknown to the Prime Minister, members of the benches behind him, from the front to the back, had grouped together during the debate. Their discussions lead to one possible leader post-David Lloyd George, the Secretary of State for War, a member who had served time in the military, time in the British Empire, and time in the War Cabinet. Lord Alfred Milner of the Conservatives.

    [​IMG]
    Lord Alfred Milner, Current Secretary of State for War

    However, the support of the rebels in the party was not enough, the Prime Minister won his theoretical Vote of No Confidence but with a much narrower margin than even his minority government. However, this did not discourage the rebels from both benches, now knowing that the Prime Minister can very well be beaten at some point. And for Lord Alfred Milner, the confidence to potentially run in the future for Prime Minister.

    The result of the debate and the scandal brought on by General Frederick Maurice ended with the Prime Minister barely hanging to power, a potential competitor in the future, emboldened rebels, and the resignation of Frederick Maurice himself. However, this was not the end for Maurice, who surprisingly was quickly scooped up by the Daily Chronicle, becoming their new Military Correspondent, a final stab in the heart for the Prime Minister, already infuriated over the debate, the Daily Chronicle's movements in 1917, and his inability to win over the newspaper.

    One last ditch effort was made, David Lloyd George once again asked to buy the newspaper off Robert Donald, and with a gleeful glint in his eye, responded. £1.1 Million for the Newspaper. Deflated and defeated knowing nobody would dare attempt to finance him for petty revenge, the Prime Minister stood down his attack, and went silent.

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    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
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  8. historybuff Well-Known Member

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    Keeps getting more interesting, and I see the newspaper is only part of it.
     
  9. Threadmarks: Chapter 4 - The Media vs Radio

    Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    Thank you again @historybuff, and yeah, the newspaper won't be everything, I'm hoping that the deeper into the timeline I go, the more the events of OTL would change just enough to create more to write about. But first, I got another update on the newspaper! Thank you to @MatthewFirth and @CrazyGeorge for the likes on the last one, and those who liked the previous two chapters!

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    Chapter 4

    1922, the United Kingdom came to experience the start of one of the most important changes to media in it's history. Coming from the banks of the Thames, broadcasting from Marconi House, the British Broadcasting Company was founded. Broadcasting across London on channel 2LO, the BBC began broadcasts, including new radio news bulletins recapping all of the days events and news in one location to the masses, for one hour a day to start with.

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    [​IMG]
    The historic Marconi House, home of the BBC, and Fleet Street, home of London newspapers.

    However, as soon as the BBC started broadcasting, they came up against hearty opposition. The well established and popular newspapers of Fleet Street attacked the BBC for using their newspapers, headlines ripped straight off the front pages, to recap the news in the radio news bulletins.

    One Fleet Street newspaper to be outraged by this was the Daily Chronicle, however it wasn't an agreement amongst the highest ranks, Editor Robert Donald and Owner and Son of the Daily Chronicle's founder, Frank Lloyd. A split occurred between them, with Robert Donald being for the BBC using other newspaper's headlines; with the expectation that radio as a news format would never get off the ground, and wouldn't pose a threat to the newspaper. However, Frank Lloyd thought otherwise; like his father, he was raised, and practised in his adulthood, keeping a watch on the advancement of technology and insuring that his industry and business would not be left behind. And the reckless practices of the BBC would pose one of the deepest threats to the survival of the newspaper.

    However, the one thing both leaders of the Daily Chronicle agreed on was that the BBC, and radio for news, would never become a popular format. But the disagreement on the threat that the actions of the BBC were producing created a division between the two, with Robert Donald respectively electing to sit aside for Frank Lloyd, to join the Fleet Street Consortium against he BBC.

    In the consortium, an unlikely coalition between former enemies; Press Baron Lord Beaverbrook of the Daily Express, who Lloyd had come in contact with when David Lloyd George was attempting to buy out the paper, and rival newspaper founder; Viscount Northcliffe of the Daily Mail and Daily Mirror, was formed among other owners, founders, and editors of Fleet Street and beyond.

    The fight back against the BBC finished before the new year came around, with the newspapers winning their side of the argument, and the BBC being ordered by the UK Government to only use News Wire copies, the same copies that any other newspaper would use, putting them on equal footing with the rest of news-media. The BBC were soon unwilling but deflated subscribers to the likes of Reuters, the Press Association, and Exchange Telegraph to name a small selection of News Wires.

    However, this was not the end of the fight for Frank Lloyd, as during the fight against the BBC, one evening with the enemy turned ally; Lord Beaverbrook, at a larger social, turned into an idea that Frank Lloyd will run with. When commenting to Lord Beaverbrook his fears of threat from the BBC, especially the approach his father taught him of fighting against development, Lord Beaverbrook responded with relatively wise words; “Well that doesn't seem intuitive at all, the development of the printing press lead to our newspapers. We must never fight back to stop the progression of technology, if anything, we should embrace it. I only fight my case on the BBC because it does set a standard that nobody else should ever copy...as you know well”, taking a subtle punch at the plagiarised history in Edward Lloyd's past, before the founding of the Daily Chronicle. “I would prefer you not bring up my father thank you. But you raise a fair point”...

    Frequent visits to the suburbs of London succeeded the success against the BBC, with Frank Lloyd having an ambitious plan on his mind, one on scale that his father had probably concocted when planning to buy the Daily Chronicle. Frank Lloyd would thrust upon London another radio station. A competitor to the BBC, that will treat newspapers right, but aim to progress and overtake the BBC non the less.

    The assistance to the project that would come from being the sister media station to the Daily Chronicle would be a massive advantage, with their own journalism and own intellectual property to use. Whilst the radio station would be funded by another hour of short and personal advertisements, some at an added cost to a newspaper advertisement, and some as a dedicated payment, exclusive to the radio waves.

    The idea for the location was already present in his head. Years before, he watched and covered the construction, and following failure of Edward Watkin's pet project, the Wembley Tower, affectionately named Watkin's Tower, before infamously gaining the moniker of Watkin's Folly. The idea of a landmark that far out of London, drawing visitors, tourists, events, was a plan Lloyd had admired. Now, with plans to open a new radio station, a landmark would be the perfect symbol for the new innovation.

    The propositions offered for Watkin's Tower were still as relevant as they were when they were designed, but the ambitious mind of Edward Watkin was his downfall, wanting to beat out the Eiffel Tower, when a smaller tower would also be as effective. Frank Lloyd did not have this issue, as he identified this issue of ambition, and with a new scale in mind, he scowled over the files and files of drawings, before coming to a decision.

    A Proposal numbered No.54, an unreservedly Gothic design, reminiscent to the towers of Tower Bridge, but in that jungle of metal the Eiffel Tower was. The tower was rectangular in shape, with four legs spreading diagonally out, curved like a table leg for the support needed. The original designed height was 395m, but after back and forth with the architects behind it, they agreed on the much smaller scale of a 295m tower, which would still put it far above the building below it in rank, the Woolworth Building of Manhattan. And still put it in the sights of the Eiffel Tower, only 5 meters smaller in height.

    Watkins54.jpg
    Proposal No.54, picked from 68 designs for the failed Watkin's Tower
    However, before this progress was even started, Frank Lloyd confided the decision to his friend in the Daily Chronicle. Robert Donald's relationship with Frank Lloyd was fraught after the fight with Fleet Street against the BBC, but the announcement of the ambitious project by his boss put him over the edge. Thinking his boss crazy, Robert Donald resigned from position of Editor, in opposition to the risky venture. This left a large hole in the Daily Chronicle that needed to be filled as quickly as possible. The man who took the role was one Frederick Higginbottom, a member of the former Pall Mall Gazette before joining the Daily Chronicle in 1919.

    Closing in on his target for retirement, 1930, Frederick “Freddy” Higginbottom instantly snapped up the opportunity as one final challenge before he gave up on journalism at the end of his stint. Freddy Higginbottom delightfully did not have an opinion here or there about the ambitious radio station plans of Frank Lloyd, electing instead to continue carrying the newspaper through the times, and doing the best he can in his roll before 1930.

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  10. Unknown Member

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    What's the PoD for this?
     
  11. Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    The big plot-point for the PoD just happened, with a competitor being established for the BBC far back as early in their radio days. There were a few smaller PoDs that were either for flavour or to line up the timeline to the PoD of Competition, like for the former Alfred Milner being tipped as being a future leader, and for the latter, the fall-through of Lloyd George's attempt to by the Daily Chronicle, which did happen IOTL.

    So yeah, that's the answer, Chapter 4 had the big PoD that was the plot-point of this thread existing, and there were a few smaller ones dotted around to lead up to it.
     
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  12. Threadmarks: Chapter 5 - End of a Leader

    Ying Blanc Well-Known Member

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    Hello again and thank you for your patience! I would have had the Friday and Monday uploads ready but I'm afraid I was away from home from Friday to Monday exactly, so didn't have any spare time to post the two chapters. Plus I haven't have the time recently to continue writing chapters ahead, so may need a short break after this, Chapter 5, to catch up at least a few chapters ahead so I have something to release on drop-days. Again thank you for your patience!

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    Chapter 5
    Post War United Kingdom had still been governed by Prime Minister David Lloyd George, who started divisive to his own party, splitting the Liberals into loyalist Lloyd George Liberals, and opposition Asquith Liberals under former Prime Minister H.H Asquith; but bed-fellows with the Conservatives, the Prime Minister was still seen in the public eye as at the peak of his game, an opinion shared with applause of his Premiership over the Great War and it's aftermath. In 1918, Lloyd George called on an election which, competing in a coalition of Conservatives and his own Lloyd George Liberals, won a large majority, crushing the Asquith Liberals who however still retained opposition, and still coming away with more seats than the up-and-coming Labour Party. H.H Asquith himself did not come out of the election unscathed, with his seat lost, but retained his leadership of his branch of the Liberals. David Lloyd George continued to see a climb of popularity following on from the election after successful social reforms, and the Treaty of Versailles signed in France.

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    The Big 4 of the Versailles Peace Conference, Left to Right; David Lloyd George, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando, Georges Clemenceau, and Woodrow Wilson

    However, shortly after, in 1922, the fall of the Lloyd George Liberals would begin. David Lloyd George reached his pinnacle and would face a turbulent year.

    Fissures in the coalition between the Conservatives and Lloyd George Liberals would arise, antagonised by the Irish gaining their independence from the Union, and the seeming unwavering willingness to strike up Anglo-Soviet relations so soon after the Bolshevist Uprising. Further compounded by attempts to establish a self-governing India and a year and more of a wave of union strikes and economic downturn. Some Conservatives were tired of being on the losing side of government, and scandals in 1922 caused by the awarding of honours and titles in return for cash was the final straw with the Conservatives, with calls following demanding that Lloyd George resign over a lack of executive accountability.

    The event that spelled the end for the Prime Minister's time in office however was the potential war he would be willing to go under with Turkey over the Chanak Crisis. Calls for resignations rung out louder and more collective. Prominent Conservative figure Austin Chamberlain called a meeting to chair with other Conservative members to discuss the existing coalition, and the forthcoming election felt in the air from all the scandals striking blows on the Premiership of Lloyd George.

    Attended by names such as Bonar Law, Stanley Baldwin who had returned from retirement, and Lord Alfred Milner. Discussion span around the room from member to member. Law suggesting that breaking the coalition “wouldn't break Lloyd George's heart” whilst Baldwin added harsher comments like that Lloyd George would “tear the Conservatives apart”. However, plenty of members were present on the other side of the argument, supporting the continuation of coalition conditions, on account that if Lloyd George fell and his branch of the Liberals fell, the swing of votes to the H.H. Asquith Liberals could push them into a majority government. To decide officially on the issue once and for all, a vote was called, to decide if the Conservatives would fight their own battle in the General Election. With the vote of around 275 members across the entire benches of the party occurring later in the day, the results were as follows; 141 Aye votes, 100 No votes, Three abstentions. A rough percentage outcome of 58% to 42%.

    Austen Chamberlain agreed to step down from the leadership role, as he could see there needed to be a member of the Conservatives to lead who would be suitable for both sides of the party, with a result of 58 – 42 percent. Discussion turned among the members as to who could fill in the role, and after lengthy arguments and dealings, a decision was agreed upon, some more begrudgingly than others.

    Lord Alfred Milner was the favourite of the discussions on who should lead the party into the General Election. The previous candidate to replace Lloyd George before a no confidence vote after the Maurice Debate; Lord Alfred Milner had been around the upper eschalons of Lloyd George's Government since the Great War, first as a member of the British War Cabinet, before becoming Secretary of State for War, before finally landing a position as Secretary of State for the Colonies. He would be a popular choice for Prime Minister, as the groups thought.

    [​IMG]
    Previously on Breaking News; Lord Alfred Milner, proposed as Leader in the 1910s, became leader in the 1920s

    The meeting was called to an end, and signed off with the statement;

    “That this meeting of Conservative members of the House of Commons declares its opinion that the Conservative Party, whilst willing to cooperate with Coalition Liberals, fights the election as an independent party, with its own leader and its own programme.”

    And predictions by the Conservatives and Austen Chamberlain were correct, by the second half of 1922, David Lloyd George resigned as Prime Minister, and called upon a new General Election. The General Election was scheduled for October 1922.

    The results of the 1922 General Election were called on as a realigning of politics in the United Kingdom. The infighting between the Lloyd George and Asquith Liberals led to their collapse at the polls. The conservatives won a very comfortable election with a stable majority, under the wing of Alfred Milner, whilst the biggest gains were by the Labour Party, headed by J.R. Clynes put them into official opposition.

    Alfred Milner accepted the win for the Conservatives, and quickly got around to compiling his Cabinet, which by the end included many leading conservatives from each side of the party.

    1922 General Election Results;
    615 Seats in House of Commons

    Conservatives – Alfred Milner – 323 – 52.6%
    Labour – J.R. Clynes – 146 – 23.8%
    Asquith Liberals – H.H Asquith – 78 – 12.7%
    Lloyd George Liberals – David Lloyd George – 53 – 8.6%
    Independent Conservatives – Assorted Members – 3 – 0.5%
    National Party (NI) – Joseph Devlin – 3 – 0.5%
    Communist Party – Albert Inkpin – 2 – 0.17%
    Others – Assorted Members – 7 – 1.23%

    Big 6 of Alfred Milner's Cabinet;

    Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury – Lord Alfred Milner
    Chancellor of the Exchequer – Neville Chamberlain
    Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs – The Marquess Curzon of Kendleston
    Secretary of State for the Home Department - Stanley Baldwin
    Secretary of State for the Colonies - The Viscount William Robert Peel
    Secretary of State for India – Leo Amery

    =====================
    The race for radio news intensified over 1923, as the British Empire Exhibition went into full swing, and the BBC ramped up their efforts to become the major source of radio news in the United Kingdom. The increase in competition started with the BBC being officially granted a licence to broadcast Radio News Bulletins by the UK Postmaster General.

    Frank Lloyd knew the noose with tightening around his project, the Watkin's Tower radio station, after the BBC had been licensed before his project had been and to be completed enough to be able to exhibit at the British Empire Exhibition. Lloyd knew he needed funding, to double the speed and bring the finishing line closer to his favour. For this, he turned to his fellow Newspaper Barons, who he had successfully built a repertoire with over their collective rallying against the BBC using newspaper headlines. As well as the local railway services who would be fed increasingly and incessantly by new traffic coming to see the wonder of Watkin's Tower realised, and not just for the British Empire Exhibition! A landmark that would be permanent on the horizon and continue to bring in tourists and day travellers.

    This funding was found, after weeks and months of bartering, debating, and arguing. The boards of the Metropolitan Underground and Great Central Railways, both using local lines, agreed easily to fund the project, with the oversight that it would easily be paid back by the travel to the location. Exhibitors at the British Empire Exhibition also were easy to agree to funding, with the caveat that they would get space in the radio broadcast's advertising slots, and some asking for small metal signs; agreed to be at the base of the tower than the very top. Harder however, was the newspapers, selecting carefully from Fleet Street and beyond, Frank Lloyd found assistance in multiple Labour and Liberal leaning newspapers, who had heard the news of the BBC getting the licence, and wanting to set up competition before the Conservative government could bring it in as state owned media.

    With the funding gained, and the British Empire Exhibition just about to open it's doors, Frank Lloyd and the Daily Chronicle finally and successfully opened the second radio station in London in 1924. In the north of London, aimed at the newly built suburbs, the exhibition centre, for tourists, and commuters, the radio station ran under it's new name, sounding out inside of the halls of the British Empire Exhibition, 2WP had become the official competitor to the BBC.

    The BBC however, was not going to let 2WP operate without a fight, with the BBC there on opening day, to air the ceremonies live, whilst 2WP was inside the halls, being heard by the visitors and stall holders. Off the back of this fight inside of the British Empire Exhibition the Postmaster General once again had the tough challenge to decide whether to provide 2WP with the Licensing it needed to broadcast to the masses, in all terms against the BBC, or to stop them from broadcasting and let the BBC be the only stop for Radio News Bulletins. Behind the scenes of the government, Press Barons pushed in hard on new Prime Minister Alfred Milne to support the licensing of 2WP, giving another thing for the Postmaster General to think about.

    [​IMG]
    A postcard of the British Empire Exhibition of 1924, birthplace of the BBC v 2WP Rivalry
     
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  13. Unknown Member

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    Wonder what effects this will have on the pop culture in the long-term...
     
  14. historybuff Well-Known Member

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    Loved it. Great update.
     
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