Blue Skies in Camelot: An Alternate 60's and Beyond

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by President_Lincoln, Nov 29, 2017.

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  1. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    @President_Lincoln can I request that you make the song Southern Nights (released on January 7th 1977) a chapter title later on please, if it fits with your plans of course.
     
  2. President_Lincoln The Great Emancipator

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    You certainly can! :) I'll try to fit "Southern Nights" in there somewhere during the chapters on 1977. :D
     
  3. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    The future where Aku's evil is law, babe.
    I’d be very interested in seeing some interviews of Soviet soldiers from their war in Afghanistan ITTL.

    Also for a future chapter that returns to Afghanistan might I suggest “Who Will Save The World” as a title?

     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
  4. PNWKing There's Still Hope Out There!

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    Whatever came of the following celebrities ITTL?:
    Jim Henson
    Steve Jobs
    Carly Simon
    James Taylor
    John Lennon

    What is the status of Chrysler ITTL?

    What is the status of AMC ITTL?

    What are Bill Gates & Paul Allen doing ITTL?

    What is the status of United Artists ITTL?

    What is the status of Hershey ITTL?

    Will any new TV networks be popping up ITTL?
     
  5. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    Have you read much of the TL?
     
  6. AndyWho Well-Known Member

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    Louisiana
    I sent you a message pertaining to sports (albeit something looking towards the 1980s), Mr. President.
     
  7. wolverinethad InfoSec for America

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    Not that anything can ever be guaranteed in AH, but dollars to donuts Reagan will get shot and get to show his grace under fire.
     
  8. President_Lincoln The Great Emancipator

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    Allow me to try and answer some of these questions for you! :)

    Jim Henson is currently working on The Muppets Show in the United States after it was initially picked up by NBC back in 1970 ITTL. A movie is in the works, and Henson, Oz, and the rest of his puppeteer team are also being requested to do consulting work on big budget Hollywood pictures.

    Steve Jobs (and Steve Wozniak) are both working as technicians at Atari after Wozniak impressed the company by creating his own version of their game, Pong, from scratch. Jobs undertook a personal pilgrimage of sorts to India as he did IOTL, and by 1975, he and Wozniak were working together on circuit boards for arcade machines for Atari. :)

    Carly Simon and James Taylor are pretty much following their OTL trajectories of success in the pop music world, as well as being married to one another. They currently have a one and a half year old daughter together, named Sally.

    As mentioned in previous posts, John Lennon is following something of an interesting path ITTL. The Beatles never broke up, and are currently undergoing something of an artistic transitional period. 1974 brought their first tour since 1966, and their 1973 album Power to the People showcased an acoustic, folk-inspired sound and an increasingly political message from the group. Due to his TTL marriage to Ursula Andress and friendship with Stanley Kubrick, Lennon is also something of an amateur actor, appearing in films and television shows whenever his schedule permits. Lennon played a minor role in Kubrick's 1971 film, A Clockwork Orange, and his first major supporting role as the Chevalier du Balibari, an itinerant gambler and possible Irish spy in 1975's Barry Lyndon. "The thinking man's Beatle" has also won acclaim for his books of poetry and notoriety for his outspoken political views, particularly his support for the UK Labour Party (particularly Tony Benn) and a united, nationalist Ireland. Lennon and Andress had their first child together, a daughter they named Molly in 1973.

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    Chrysler is suffering from similar challenges from the 1973 oil shock changing customers' demand toward smaller cars as well as increased competition from imports.

    American Motors Corporation (AMC) is doing very well for themselves in TTL's 1970's, as former CEO George Romney's decision to focus their efforts on small, compact cars is paying massive dividends as AMC takes over market share from the "Big Three" car companies and the compact "Hornet" line becomes one of the iconic cars of the decade.

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    Thank you, @AndyWho! I'm sorry that I haven't had a chance to get back to you on your ideas yet. School has been killing me lately and I hope to rectify this as soon as possible. :)

    It's a possibility! Know that Moore could target someone totally different as well...
     
  9. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    I don't think Moore will target Reagan or Bush. We are going to be completely surprised again. Personally, I think either RFK or Ted will be shot but I am probably wrong. Man of my predictions have been wrong, but I am still holding onto President Shirley Temple. I wonder what she has been doing recently?
     
  10. Alpha-King98760 Aku's most favorite assassin, babe!

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    The future where Aku's evil is law, babe.
    I want a President Hillary Rodham Bush! :biggrin::p (Never thought I’d want Hillary as Commander-in-Chief, damn you @President_Lincoln!)
     
  11. Kaiser Julius Well-Known Member

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    How are The Eagles and who's playing James Bond?
     
  12. Nerdman3000 On the hunt for Great Caesar’s Ghost!

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    Miami, Florida
    You know, I’d love it if Timothy Dalton got to play Bond for more movies.
     
  13. Kaiser Julius Well-Known Member

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    Me too, he's my favourite.
     
  14. Roger Redux The Revisionist

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    The Mother of all ASBs (a.k.a. "The Real World")
    Thirded and agreed.
    I wouldn't say he's my favorite, but I definitely think he's criminally underrated.

    All it would really take is for him to accept the part one of the earlier times they offered it to him.....
    ...The first time he thought he was too young to do the part justice, and the second...I think he was either committed to something else or he still thought he wasn't quite experienced enough yet...
     
  15. Nerdman3000 On the hunt for Great Caesar’s Ghost!

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    He was offered in 1980 for the second time, but said no because he hadn’t been happy with the direction of the films at the time. So you’d have to change the direction of the films themselves, which honestly considering how cartoonish and bad the later Moore films were, would only be a good thing.

    Maybe a rewritten version of 1985’s A View to a Kill could be Dalton’s ITTL first film or retcon 1983’s Octopussy into something else which Dalton could star in.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  16. Threadmarks: Chapter 94

    President_Lincoln The Great Emancipator

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    Chapter 94: Born to Run - The Democrats Line Up for ‘76

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    Above: Hoping to capitalize on his recently widened national profile, Senator Eugene McCarthy (D - MN) became the second major Democratic candidate to enter the Presidential race, doing so on February 14th, only days after Rep. Shirley Chisholm (R - NY).


    Senator Eugene McCarthy was a lot of things to a lot of different people: a bigot, for his staunchly anti-immigration views; a peacenik, for his support for unilateral nuclear disarmament; a libertarian, for his supposedly firm commitment to the defense of civil liberties and attacks on the Internal Revenue Service; and a poet for his occasional dalliances with the written word. More so than any of these things however, McCarthy was a caustic, nasty man with a brutish personality and a restless, moody demeanor to boot. Fellow Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey (D) described Gene McCarthy as “one of the most unpleasant men I’ve ever known in politics, and I’ve known Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms!” In 1969, McCarthy left his wife Abigail of 24 years and their children to take up an “on again-off again” affair with CBS News correspondent Marya McLaughlin, leaving his five children to Abigail, and campaigning all the while against abortion, contraception, and “the decline of family values in this country”. The hypocrisy was glaring enough to bother those “in the know” about McCarthy personally, but to millions of young people tired of being spoken down to by their parents’ political party, the GOP, the nationalist liberal with a tough-talking personality seemed like he might be the Democrats’ ticket back to the White House. His campaign announcement was a spectacle and a half, to say the least. Declaring from the Senate floor that he “aimed to send that faux-Texan back to the oil fields whence he came”, McCarthy used his speech to immediately jump up on his soapbox to decry the administration’s foreign policy and neglect of its supposedly “warm and fuzzy” domestic agenda.


    In an extremely poorly-calculated move, McCarthy made nuclear disarmament, a controversial issue if ever there was one, a core component of his campaign’s central message. “With tensions on the rise once again with the Soviet Union,” the Senator explained. “We cannot afford to blow up the only world we’ve got. That is why I am calling on Moscow and Washington, and every capital around the world from London to Beijing to swear off these weapons of mass destruction, and vow to bring about their disarmament immediately.” Pundits, fellow politicians, and the public mocked McCarthy all the way to the bank. He came out looking like an impractical, starry eyed idealist at best and a downright naive fool at worst. Nonetheless, he was the hero of many an anti-war intellectual and college student, who believed his very upfront, vocal position to be very brave in a sea of arms dealers and war profiteers. McCarthy pitched himself as a “different” kind of liberal. Never again would entitlement spending be paid for on the national credit card, he swore. He wanted to ratify a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, to slash military spending and use the savings to pay down the national debt. He campaigned as the anti-Kennedy, a clear attack on what he described as “the New Frontier excess” of the previous decade, and alienating a great number of potential supporters, who would now undoubtedly look elsewhere for a horse to back.


    It wouldn’t take much looking to find possible contenders. Down in Dixie, the southern, conservative, and populist wings of the Democratic Party would be treated to more than their fair share of possible nominees. Lyndon Baines Johnson of Texas, the great founder and preserver of this wing of the party, the titan of socially conservative, New Frontier populism, first Vice President of Jack Kennedy, and the Democratic Party’s nominee for President in 1972, had finally met his end from a massive heart attack while working in his Senate office on February 28th, 1975. His last words, according to an aide, were “Lady Bird is going to fucking kill me for this”, referring to his heart attack. He was 66 years old. Johnson’s passing was mourned far and wide, throughout the party and beyond. His allies were numerous and his stature gigantic. Even Senator Robert F. Kennedy, his great political nemesis and rival, the de facto leader of the party’s northern, progressive wing, was forced to admit “we’ve lost a champion today” when he and his wife, Ethel, heard the news. Johnson’s funeral, on March 3rd, would be attended by his old boss, the former President Kennedy, nearly every Senator, Representative, and dignitary in Washington, and most of the national press corps as well. Even as the race for the Democratic nod in ‘72 was getting under way, the prodigious shadow of LBJ was bound to hang over all of the candidates. These were indeed massive shoes to fill.


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    In light of Johnson’s passing, it was perhaps fitting that the first Southern Democrat to announce their candidacy was fellow moderate Lloyd Bentsen (D - TX), Governor of the Lone Star State and a longtime LBJ protege. Unlike many of his fellow southerners, who would dive into the race without much longtime preparation before the fact, the two-term Texas Governor had been planning a Presidential run since before his own reelection the prior November. Throughout 1974, Bentsen had embarked on a nationwide tour of speaking events and “political water testing”. He visited 30 states and raised over $350,000 from a single fundraiser in his home state alone. By the time of his official announcement on February 17th, Bentsen had raised more than $1,250,000, the most of any prospective candidate, and won the endorsement of the soon to be deceased LBJ. In terms of establishment appeal, the tall, handsome, Texan, who’d flown combat missions as a Colonel in World War II, winning the Distinguished Flying Cross four times for his bravery in battle, and built a reputation during his time in the U.S. House as a protege to the legendary Speaker Sam Rayburn and as a mean card player with the perfect poker face seemed to be pretty high up there. His candidacy was, in the words of commentator and writer Hunter S. Thompson “as formidable as it was depressing.” The Governor, who was 53 at the time, certainly had a lot of things going for him, but he had weaknesses as well. An uninspiring record in the House and a largely forgettable time served in the Governor’s Mansion left an overall impression that he was a “party man” rather than a potential leader of his fellow men. He gave off the appearance of a Johnsonite-stooge, someone who hoped to luck his way into the nomination (or at least the VP slot) without putting in too much effort, just because his centrism and moderate-to-conservative, blue collar appeal made him look, on the surface, like LBJ come again. Bentsen did not initially have a strong national organization, and his conservative outlook was bound to make him unpopular with organized labor, whose help he needed to counter his lack of national prominence in the Northern, industrial cities. The Texan knew he needed to rebrand himself, and win powerful allies if he was to secure the position of “front-runner” in the soon-to-be crowded field he so desperately craved. He did receive a major boon in the form of an endorsement from Senator Henry M. “Scoop” Jackson of Washington, a largely conservative hawk who after failed bids of his own in ‘68 and ‘72 decided that he’d be better off sitting out ‘76 and hoping for a VP nod or perhaps a cabinet position. He figured he’d make a strong Secretary of State, Defense, or the Interior, for instance. The Texas Governor was also aided by another endorsement from an unexpected source, a new political magazine.


    The 1976 Democratic primaries saw the true beginning of a “culture war” in the political realm. The Doe v. Bolton decision had enraged Catholic and Evangelical Democrats, who felt like the Kennedy/Liberal wing of the Party had neglected their anti-abortion views for too long. Through the publication of a new Magazine, American Values (founded by Evangelist preacher Rev. Billy Graham, policy man Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Pro life Activist and New York Congressional Candidate, Ellen McCormack, and Congressman Bob Casey of Pennsylvania) an effective voice for this movement was born, with its inaugural issue stating that its mission was to “bring America closer to a place where our God-given rights to Life, Liberty, and Pursuit of Happiness are protected to the fullest extent, whether it be in the Womb, in the Factory, or on the Front lines”. It also became an informal training ground for Pro-Life Democratic Candidates, with many a contributor going on to run for office in the future. The magazine countered the growing calls for Social Democracy within the Democratic Party and instead promoted “Christian Democracy” - an ideology typical in European political parties, which espoused social and cultural conservatism but center-left economic policies, “for the benefit of the common man, his values, and to celebrate Christian teachings.” This populist bent played perfectly with Bentsen’s campaign, and he appeared on the magazine’s inaugural cover story in July of 1975.


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    Above: Governor Lloyd Bentsen (D - TX), Democratic candidate for President giving a newspaperman a sit down interview, at a roadside diner in Dallas, shortly after his announcement.


    Unfortunately for Bentsen, the field exploded with competition in the immediate aftermath of his mentor’s passing, beginning first with the populist Congressman Wilbur Mills of Arkansas, who as ranking Democrat and former Chairman of the immensely important House Ways and Means Committee had long been known colloquially as “the most powerful man in Washington”. Founding his campaign on what he saw as the need for an automatic Cost of Living Adjustment to Social Security, and running on his record of helping to secure the funding for Medicare, Medicaid, and the rest of President Kennedy’s New Frontier, as well as his renowned fiscal restraint, Mills declared that his run was “the cure for all of our country’s fiscal ills”. Mills also made farmers’ issues a key plank of his positions as well, hoping to corner the vote in early voting rural states like Iowa and New Hampshire. After the ‘72 convention fights, the Democratic National Committee had adopted open primaries for most of the states in the nation, which meant candidates would need to build momentum early. Unlike Bentsen, who hoped to capture moderate to conservative voters throughout the country from his stalwart base of support in the Solid South, Mills actively hoped to bring in disaffected Northern liberals as well, who could not bring themselves to back the much loathed Gene McCarthy but insisted on the defense of New Frontier programs and their expansion in the wake of Bush-era austerity and tax cuts. Mills actively courted the support of former Senator George McGovern (D - SD), whose narrow defeat in his ‘74 reelection bid had killed McGovern’s own hopes for a serious run at the White House in ‘76, and who was widely seen as a hero to farmers across the nation. For the time being, McGovern remained distant, but did realize that he could possibly hope for a cabinet post in a future Democratic administration. For the time being, he satisfied himself with a return to academia.

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    Congressman Wilbur Mills (D - AR) enters the race, March 3rd, 1975​


    As if Bentsen and Mills’ candidacies weren’t enough for the Southern wing of the party to consider, they were soon joined by several more competitors as well. There had been much talk of recently elected Senators Dale Bumpers (D - AR) and Jimmy Carter (D - GA) getting into the race for President, but their jump to the Upper Chamber of Congress seemed to be enough of a climb for both of them for the time being, as they both disavowed any attempts to draft them and promised not to seek the Presidency in ‘76, pledges they would both uphold. Likewise, fellow “New South” Governor Reubin Askew of Florida, despite his reputation as the incorruptible “Reubin the Good” and penchants for compromise, leadership, and bridge-building, had made an election promise to the people of the Sunshine State to serve a full second term if reelected. He didn’t earn that spotless reputation by going back on his word to his constituents. Despite Bumpers, Carter, and Askew sitting ‘76 out, Bentsen and Mills would still fight over the title of “choice of the South” with two more sons of Dixie: Senator J. Terry Sanford (D - NC) and Governor George C. Wallace (D - AL). Sanford had been JFK’s second and more popular Vice President with New Frontier Democrats. Socially and economically liberal, with a history of service as a decorated veteran of the Second World War, then an FBI Agent, then Governor and Senator from his State (not to mention an eagle scout), Sanford was in many ways the quintessential “all American” candidate, and his campaign announcement in early March, 1975, reflected that. Speaking from his home state’s capital in Raleigh, Sanford gave his announcement from a massive wooden bandstand, with the smell of barbeque and beer in the afternoon air, and called on “a renewed commitment to the ideals of the party of Jefferson, Roosevelt, and Kennedy.” Though not a charismatic speaker, Sanford was eloquent and chose his words carefully and deliberately. He used his speech to address what he saw as “the elephant in the room: we have to keep moving forward”. It wasn’t enough, Sanford argued, to preserve and protect Jack Kennedy’s legacy, it had to be carried forward into the future. Sanford called for aggressive desegregation of public schools throughout the South and beyond by busing or “forced integration”, a controversial stance, but one that won him respect with liberals throughout the country. He made better race relations a major theme of his campaign, and worked extensively with Civil Rights leaders to advocate for continued economic aid to African American communities across the nation.


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    Senator Terry Sanford (D - NC) enters the race on March 10th, 1975​

    George Corey Wallace’s campaign was dominated by two messages from its very inception: “I no longer support segregation” and “I am a loyal Democrat, down to the bone.” Both of these were a hard sell with the voters, however. Wallace’s insistence on “moderating” his racial views to catch up with Johnson’s New Southern machine and the rest of the country was inconsistent with his continued opposition to desegregation through busing, and the memory of his run with the abominable American Conservative Party in 1968, which likely cost Hubert Humphrey the White House, left a terrible taste in most Democrats’ mouth as the primary campaigning got under way. He hoped nevertheless to corner the same market as Congressman Mills’ campaign. By appealing to blue collar workers and social conservatives, though no longer out and out racists, Wallace believed he had a viable path to the nomination. A letter from Wallace to LBJ from four years prior however, in which the Alabama Governor vowed never to run for President again, quickly resurfaced and was leaked to the national press who took the ball and ran with it. Though Wallace would remain in the campaign after the letter scandal broke over the summer, he would never poll above the single digits anywhere outside of his home state. He dropped out in September, and began to consider running for a Senate seat instead. With Wallace out, it was time for the Northerners and Westerners to dive in as well. By the end of March, half a dozen more candidates announced their own bids. Senator Edmund Muskie, the narrowly defeated runner up from ‘72 seemed a worthy contender, though his campaign was plagued by rumors of infighting and poor organization from its inception. It seemed like his moment had passed, and if he couldn’t beat LBJ in ‘72, he would struggle even more with several liberal competitors in ‘76. Besides, Muskie’s cold, intellectual effect did not play well to crowds of prospective voters, especially on radio and television. He came off as distant, aloof, and erudite, not the sort of man you’d naturally elect to grab a beer with, let alone make leader of the free world. Senator John Glenn (D - OH) the moderate senior Senator from Ohio, former Gemini Astronaut, and Vice Presidential nominee last time around emerged as the early front-runner and was also a seemingly “safe” pick. He had the support of many big party bosses in Cleveland, Detroit, and other industrial cities with his pledges to “support American labor and American businesses” - running a populist streak into his normally bland, middle of the road policy proposals, and his excellent name recognition and reputation for non-partisan, “common sense solutions” gave him a big boost in the early polls. Once again though, Glenn suffered from a lack of enthusiasm among his supporters and generally struggled to break through as a superstar in his own right. What the liberal wing of the party desperately wanted was to fall in love. They wanted a “feel good” candidate with charisma, style, and flair they could rally behind. They wanted someone who could really fill the massive hole left by RFK’s inability to run.


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    Above: Senator Edmund Muskie (D - ME) and Senator John Glenn (D - OH) each entered the race in mid-March, 1975, a period referred to by Hunter S. Thompson as “the real March Madness”.


    Though no one candidate could fully satiate liberal Democrats’ desire to be wooed by their eventual nominee, as no one could live up to RFK and his elder brother in the eyes of many, there was one individual whose campaign announcement did manage to stir, energize, and fire up the progressive Democratic base in a manner that few others did. Congressman Morris K. Udall (D - AZ) better known as “Mo”, was a tall (6’5”), Lincoln-esque figure renowned in the political world for his self-deprecating wit and easygoing manner. Udall once said that his physical stature and lanky frame kept him from ever having a date throughout high school, and thus he developed his self-deprecating sense of humor “to survive”. Beloved by his usually conservative constituents despite his very liberal, independent views for his irreverent and casual style (especially his western clothes and cowboy boots, which he often wore to work) and his impeccable personal integrity and ethics, Udall was once summed up by political junkie James Perry as “funny, smart, down-to-earth, honest, sassy, and patient”. Udall was born on June 15th, 1922 in St. Johns, Arizona to Louisa and Levi Udall, a writer keenly interested in Indian life and culture, and a lawyer who served as Chief Justice of the Arizona Supreme Court from 1946 to 1960. One of six children, Mo and his elder brother, Stewart, would often remember their father’s dinnertime sermons about the importance of responsible people entering public service. Both Stewart and Mo would take these lessons as a call to arms. At the age of six, Mo lost his right eye during an accident involving one of his closest friends and a pocket knife. The two boys were attempting to cut some string when Mo’s eye was accidentally cut, causing intense pain. Adequate medical attention was not immediately forthcoming, due to the family’s lack of money at the time, causing Udall to ultimately lose the eye. For the rest of his life, Udall would wear a glass eye; the loss would influence Udall’s life, personality, and inspire him to pursue the creation of a National Health Care system to help care for the sick and wounded everywhere. Udall would also note that life in his small, rural town was “harsh and primitive, at times.” “People where I come from didn’t own horses.” Udall claimed. “We had horses and plows.”


    While in High School, despite the lack of a right eye, Udall became a star athlete in basketball, and football, where he was the quarterback of an undefeated varsity team. He also played in the school marching band, wrote political editorials for his school newspaper, and took leading roles in school plays. Later, he would attend the University of Arizona, where he was again a star basketball player and co-captain of his team, not to mention President of Student Government. After graduation he played one season of professional basketball with the NBA team the Denver Nuggets during the 1948-49 season and earned his law degree from the University of Denver law school in 1949. Raised Mormon, Udall’s personal views on religion would develop and change over time. He was driven away from his original faith, largely over the church’s teachings at the time on black people being “cursed”. He eventually discovered his own personal faith through philosophy and history studies in college, but believed “strongly” in the separation of church and state. During World War II, Udall attempted to enlist in the United States Army, and nearly succeeded. During the necessary eye exams, Udall would simply cover his glass eye whenever he was told to alternate. The young Arizonan was medically cleared and would likely have gotten away with the deception, if it weren’t for another potential enlistee complaining that he had failed on account of flat feet, “but Mo Udall had passed with just one eye!” The examiners tested Udall again under additional scrutiny, and he was rejected. A year later, medical standards changed and Udall was able to serve in the Military in non-combat roles for the remainder of the War. Udall enlisted in the Army Air Corps and commanded an all-black squadron for two years, another experience which Udall said “shaped his life forever”. Udall’s service alongside black troops inspired in him a lifelong dedication to Civil Rights causes, and made him both aware and open-minded to the struggles of the black community. After the war, Udall finished his military service and retired with the rank of Captain.


    Mo practiced law alongside his brother Stewart in Tucson, creating their own firm, Udall & Udall in 1949. Mo was also elected Pima County chief deputy attorney and county attorney, taught Labor law at the University of Arizona law school in the mid-50’s, and and in 1961 became vice president of the State Bar Association. Udall always dreamed of a career in politics, but his hopes were delayed by his first wife, Patricia, who demanded that he remain in a career closer to home. Thus, when an opportunity arose to run for the House seat for the U.S. Second District in 1954, Mo deferred to his older brother, who ran for and won the position. Stewart would serve in that capacity until 1961, when he was appointed U.S. Secretary of Agriculture by President John F. Kennedy. Mo won a special election to finish his brother’s term, and was then narrowly elected to a term in his own right in 1962. Handily reelected in every race since, Udall’s seat was considered far and away one of the safest in the country, despite its intensely conservative, Goldwater-ite voter base. During his twelve years in the house thus far, Udall had become known as “the Conscience of the House”, and a leading expert on labor relations, conservation and environmental protection, making access to quality health care universal to all Americans, regardless of income level or wealth, and of a peaceful, value-based foreign policy which upheld American ideals of freedom and goodness, as outlined in the Kennedy Doctrine. Udall announced his candidacy for President in front of his childhood home in St. Johns, and made it clear from the beginning that he intended to be the liberal candidate to beat in the race. More progressive than virtually anyone else in the race, Udall hoped to rally the Kennedys and their supporters to his cause with his charm and personality, something that other leading liberals McCarthy and Muskie sorely lacked. Due to his labor expertise, Udall quickly earned the backing of Senator Hubert Humphrey (D - MN); the Congressman hoped this was only the first of many endorsements still to come. Privately, former President John F. Kennedy told Jackie that he was pulling for Udall. “We ought to keep an eye on Stewart’s brother.” He said with a wise grin. “There’s something really special about him.”


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    Above: U.S. Representative Morris K. “Mo” Udall (D - AZ), 52 years old, enters the race on March 26th, 1975.​


    April 1st, 1975 - Gallup Poll of Likely Democratic Primary Voters (Nationwide)


    Who would you most prefer to be the Democratic Nominee for President?


    Senator John Glenn (D - OH) - 22%

    Governor Lloyd Bentsen (D - TX) - 16%

    Senator Ed Muskie (D - ME) - 14%

    Representative Mo Udall (D - AZ) - 12%


    Senator Eugene McCarthy (D - MN) - 12%

    Senator Terry Sanford (D - NC) - 8%

    Representative Wilbur Mills (D - AR) - 7%

    Representative Shirley Chisholm (D - NY) - 2%

    Other/Undecided - 7%

    [​IMG]


    Next Time on Blue Skies in Camelot: Southeast Asia and the People’s Republic of China
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  17. Gerbbro John Bel Edwards Democrat

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    Rest in peace, LBJ you magnificent bastard. Those last words are so him. Well done. I am very glad that he got to live longer than OTL and that he managed to have a successful career despite him never having reached his goal.

    Regarding the rest of the update, I'm personally rooting for Lloyd Bentsen.
     
  18. SavoyTruffle Illennial

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    Tamriel
    And so passes a great statesman of his age.

    Not sure if this is the Democratic field or a Smash Bros roster.
     
  19. President_Lincoln The Great Emancipator

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    Thank you, @Gerbbro! :) I'm glad I could give him a worthy send off. Bentsen definitely has a lot going for him, especially as new ideological wings like the Social Democrats and Christian Democrats are on the rise.
     
  20. President_Lincoln The Great Emancipator

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    Har! I love it. :D
     
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