Best rearmament of the Reichswehr?

So if we along the idea of the Reichswehr only having 40 divisions by the mid 40s, could the industry then support the large scale production of medium and heavy cannons?

No, because the state would act on peacetime orders.

The German division of the first wave consists of 36 105 mm Howitzers, 12 155 mm Howitzers and 4 105 mm guns. In addition, the peaceful Reichswarra would probably like to have all batteries motorized.

Additionally, you have 6 x 75 mm Huabics for each infantry regiment.

In addition, a 9-gun 210 mm mortar battalion for each corps with a 170 mm cannon battery.
 
Don’t know if this helps, but the Black Reichswehr of OTL was largely built with Soviet aid.
No, it wasn't. The Black Reichswehr was the Reichswehr's domestic apparatus including paramilitaries to deal with domestic opponents. Reichswehr cooperation with the USSR was its own thing entirely.
 
They're easier to make, but they take longer to reload, are less accurate, give away firing positions (requiring a shoot and scoot approach), and aren't capable of continuous fire. Very bad for artillery duels.
Very true. Like I mentioned later, they'd theoretically fill the infantry support and/or saturation bombardment roles, freeing up the limited arty for more important things.
 
No, because the state would act on peacetime orders.

The German division of the first wave consists of 36 105 mm Howitzers, 12 155 mm Howitzers and 4 105 mm guns. In addition, the peaceful Reichswarra would probably like to have all batteries motorized.

Additionally, you have 6 x 75 mm Huabics for each infantry regiment.

In addition, a 9-gun 210 mm mortar battalion for each corps with a 170 mm cannon battery.

Thats similar to what the nazi era army was aiming at circa 1939 or 1940. A corps of two infantry divisions would have 145 cannon, including the 18 75mm caliber regimental cannon. For comparison the French X Corps defending Sedan 13 May 1940 had 172 cannon, about 40% of them medium and heavy cannon of the corps Groupment. The actual number varied from one corps to another & depended on the current mission. The army commander also had a groupment of heavy cannon battalions & batteries.

Given the actual cannon production of 1934-1940 a 21 division Reichswehr of 1940 could very likely be equipped with up to ten corps groups of medium and heavy cannon with a average of forty eight cannon each.
 
No, it wasn't. The Black Reichswehr was the Reichswehr's domestic apparatus including paramilitaries to deal with domestic opponents. Reichswehr cooperation with the USSR was its own thing entirely.

Earlier I referred to Kleine-Albrandts interviews with the surviving Reichwehr officers. They explained that the core or formal part of the Black Reichwehr were the local police auxiliaries. The Army disposed of large quantities of small arms including machine guns and mortars in compliance with the Versialles treaty disarmament provisions, by handing them over to the city and state police forces. Often by just giving them the keys to the old Imperial army kasserene & armories. The police forces then recruited reliable veterans as police reservists and younger men as the 1920s passed. The Reichswehr was not allowed to maintain a 'reserve' for mobilization into the standing Army. But the police auxiliaries were organized so they could be formed into infantry battalions with MG & mortars. Their training consisted of basic infantry skills. Utility automobiles and horses were also available to the police auxiliaries. Once mobilized this police force or Black Reichswehr constituted a large force of infantry battalions or regiments that could reinforce the existing seven divisions of the Reichwehr, supplement them as independent formations, and provide replacements for combat casualties. Klien-Albrandt estimate this 'police reserve' at 300,000 men. The Reichwehr officers interviewed considered the other paramilitaries less reliable, the 1920s nazi SA being a example of the worst of the lot. The police reservists being screened for reliability and discipline.
 
Thats similar to what the nazi era army was aiming at circa 1939 or 1940. A corps of two infantry divisions would have 145 cannon, including the 18 75mm caliber regimental cannon. For comparison the French X Corps defending Sedan 13 May 1940 had 172 cannon, about 40% of them medium and heavy cannon of the corps Groupment. The actual number varied from one corps to another & depended on the current mission. The army commander also had a groupment of heavy cannon battalions & batteries.

Given the actual cannon production of 1934-1940 a 21 division Reichswehr of 1940 could very likely be equipped with up to ten corps groups of medium and heavy cannon with a average of forty eight cannon each.
I followed the example of those from 1939/40 because that's probably what they were striving for. Hitler did not take his plans for organizing the division from heaven either.

If the 21st Division's plan for 1940 years is a realistic scenario, 40 division is unlikely. Especially since the Lufftwaffe and Panzerwaffe would begin to form on the ground.
 
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I followed the example of those from 1939/40 because that's probably what they were striving for. Hitler did not take his plans for organizing the division from heaven either.

If the 21st Division's plan for 1940 years is a realistic scenario, 40 division is unlikely. Especially since the Lufftwaffe and Panzerwaffe would begin to form on the ground.

I agree a target of 40 divisions, or 15 Corps is unlikely for 1935 or 1940. But 21 Div is still inadequate for defense over the longer run. Adding 20 more third wave reserve divisions 1945-1950 would not be economically impractical. As the reservists trained in the 1930s age they would be the fillers for these third tier infantry divisions. One or two of the additional divisions might also be add on armored or motor inf formations. Alternately a handful might be some form of Bodenstange formations. The Imperial Army had several"'fortress divisions' for garrisoning place like Metz, Strausberg, Konigsberg...

Theres also the US Army model, which during the interwar years maintained a cadre for about 40 divisions in the for of the Reserve Officers Corps, but did not maintain actual formations or enlisted reservists.
 
I agree a target of 40 divisions, or 15 Corps is unlikely for 1935 or 1940. But 21 Div is still inadequate for defense over the longer run. Adding 20 more third wave reserve divisions 1945-1950 would not be economically impractical. As the reservists trained in the 1930s age they would be the fillers for these third tier infantry divisions. One or two of the additional divisions might also be add on armored or motor inf formations. Alternately a handful might be some form of Bodenstange formations. The Imperial Army had several"'fortress divisions' for garrisoning place like Metz, Strausberg, Konigsberg...

Theres also the US Army model, which during the interwar years maintained a cadre for about 40 divisions in the for of the Reserve Officers Corps, but did not maintain actual formations or enlisted reservists.
The question of the possibility of producing cannons. Maybe as part of building a deep base, they would expand production in Sweden or the Netherlands. Additionally, with regular orders and limited calibers.

It would be possible to expand to these 40 divisions, 3 armored divisions and another 2 motor divisions by 1950.
 
The question of the possibility of producing cannons. Maybe as part of building a deep base, they would expand production in Sweden or the Netherlands. Additionally, with regular orders and limited calibers.

It would be possible to expand to these 40 divisions, 3 armored divisions and another 2 motor divisions by 1950.

If they want to spend the money. Theres also the matter of needs. If there has been no major European war for 2-3 decades people may have a attitude similar to the current Europe.
 
The question of the possibility of producing cannons. Maybe as part of building a deep base, they would expand production in Sweden or the Netherlands. Additionally, with regular orders and limited calibers.

It would be possible to expand to these 40 divisions, 3 armored divisions and another 2 motor divisions by 1950.
That's assuming, of course, that Poland doesn't do something stupid in the meantime, like launch an invasion of East Prussia with Soviet support.
 
That's assuming, of course, that Poland doesn't do something stupid in the meantime, like launch an invasion of East Prussia with Soviet support.
While Polish leadership frequently showed poor judgement, they are unlikely to stick out their necks like that. Nor would the Soviets support such a thing. After all, they're still cooperating with the Reichswehr and want to continue exercising influence in Germany through the KPD.
 
While Polish leadership frequently showed poor judgement, they are unlikely to stick out their necks like that. Nor would the Soviets support such a thing. After all, they're still cooperating with the Reichswehr and want to continue exercising influence in Germany through the KPD.
Still though, you can never be too careful with Uncle Joe in the Kremlin.
 
Still though, you can never be too careful with Uncle Joe in the Kremlin.
Stalin was notorious for being paranoid and cautious. He's not going to start World War II. The idea that he would do something without Hitler messing things up and distracting the West is based on needing a villain in alternate WWIIs, not historical reality.
 
That's assuming, of course, that Poland doesn't do something stupid in the meantime, like launch an invasion of East Prussia with Soviet support.
Any Polish state free from Muscovite domination willingly allying itself to the Soviets has already exhibited a willingness to risk revolution from their own people to keep power but also tempt the Russians to set up bases and never leave - in other words, weapons-grade stupidity.
 
How would tank designs differ from the Nazi ones? I doubt that there will be heavy tanks.
Intially they won't differ much. The original layout or specifications of what we call the Mk II, Mk III, & MkIV reached back to the work Guderian & his fellow Panzer fans did back in the Reichwehr days. The Mk I was a intern vehicle, hastily designed & fielded during the 'nazi' expansion 1934-1939. intended as a training vehicle it was retained in the combat formations as a scout vehicle as production fo the MkII had not caught up to needs. In a more methidical and less ambitious Reichwehr growth the Pz MkI would probably not appear in combat formation, if at all.

The Pz Mk IV was originally considered a heavy tank by the German armor leaders. With its 75mm short cannon and HE ammo it was to be added in small support units in the panzer battalions, for attacking AT guns of bunkers. There was a proposed Pz Mk V heavy tank. Only ten prototypes were built for tests. In 1940 these were deployed as a support company to Norway. If you reach deep enough you can find propaganda photos of these parked around Oslo, or later other West European cities. Absent a war nothing like the Taigers or panther would be built. Those were built to reflect the experience of 1939-1941 & without that experience design of the next generation will go in other directions.
 
Maybe they take that radical late WWI design with the 57mm gun that looks a lot like a Panzer III as a starting point. And maybe that's enough to convince the US Army to buy Christie's 1924 prototype. Leading Germany to copy the suspension...
 
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