Battleship of the Future (From 1940)

Hi guys,

A quick question here. I found the below picture somewhere - Probably FaceBook - And was thinking about the exhaust system. Specifically that.

AzHCp58 22[1].jpg

Ignoring the obvious flooding issues with the exhaust just above water, my question is this:

In the above the exhaust runs along a waterline blister to the stern where it exits the ship. I presume this is to avoid smoke on the horizon and aid in spotting your own guns (No smoke hinderence).

My question is: What would the effect of the cold seawater be? The 'funnel' is below water level, so there will be quite a dramatic cooling effect on the hot exhaust gasses. Will they exit at the stern as cold clean air having dropped all the soot particles etc out, or will the soot etcc still exit? Will it condense into a kind of liquid sludge that needs cleaning at a later date etc?

Thank you :)
 

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Looks like it was designed by the good idea fairy department. 😱

Working that ship would be a PITA for the crew

I mean launching a boat for a run ashore.....without any boats cranes etc...MUTINY! lol

How does it recover its float plane?

3 different design of main turret?

Oh my days
 
There's a thread over at World of Warships on these concepts: The Streamlined Battleships
This includes a line drawing of the UK design with it's mix of twin, triple and quad turrets.

ETA: Now that I think on it, this might be a possibility for the British Republic of the EDCverse late in the Eastern War once airpower is demonstrated as a significant threat to capital ships.
 
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Looks like it was designed by the good idea fairy department. 😱

Working that ship would be a PITA for the crew

I mean launching a boat for a run ashore.....without any boats cranes etc...MUTINY! lol

How does it recover its float plane?

3 different design of main turret?

Oh my days
TBH I am only looking at the exhaust system, but the WoW thread above answers some of those Q's.
 
There's a thread over at World of Warships on these concepts: The Streamlined Battleships
This includes a line drawing of the UK design with it's mix of twin, triple and quad turrets.

ETA: Now that I think on it, this might be a possibility for the British Republic of the EDCverse late in the Eastern War once airpower is demonstrated as a significant threat to capital ships.
Thank you.

Tzoli sure does some nice images. They don't answer the exhaust gas question really, apart from that crew quarters aft will be HOT!!! lol
 
Thank you.

Tzoli sure does some nice images. They don't answer the exhaust gas question really, apart from that crew quarters aft will be HOT!!! lol
Handy if they're spending time in the Arctic...

Now personally I'd prefer a 4/3/2 layout fore and aft and no midships turret. Maybe 6" secondaries and an extensive 3" heavy AA tertiary battery. In the EDCverse it should be around late in the Eastern war, just as improved airpower and guided weapons dooms the battleline...
 
... snip

My question is: What would the effect of the cold seawater be? The 'funnel' is below water level, so there will be quite a dramatic cooling effect on the hot exhaust gasses. Will they exit at the stern as cold clean air having dropped all the soot particles etc out, or will the soot etcc still exit? Will it condense into a kind of liquid sludge that needs cleaning at a later date etc?

Thank you :)
Initially, the exhaust at the rear would be cooled significantly, but still smoky, as particles would stay suspended in the highish-velocity gasses.
However, condensed steam and would tend to coagulate with soot onto the cool surfaces and on any disruptions in the tubes, lining them with a nice insulating layer. Thereafter, the exhaust would be much as typical flue gasses - hot, steamy, smoky.
The muck would reduce draught, and therefore performance, and would no doubt be a revolting job for defaulters and CPO's 'eager volunteers' to clean.

Aside from the numerous other issues with the design, I note the hull cross-section and armour distribution pictured is essentially that of HMS Hood - not exactly a cutting-edge 1940s design!
 

GarethC

Donor
I'm kind of expecting that North Atlantic weather will make the whole question moot by flooding the exhaust every ninety seconds or so until, so that it can't draw and so the boilers go out after burning the available oxygen.
 
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The exhaust stack running along the water line is just asking for flooding from Battle damage. One penetration from a shell or torpedo into the exhaust system and water will leak into every engineering compartment, causing the ship to lose power and rapidly sink
 
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GarethC

Donor
The exhaust stack running along the water line is just asking for flooding from Battle damage. One penetration from a show or torpedo into the exhaust system and water will leak into every engineering compartment, causing the ship to lose power and rapidly sink
Nah, that won't happen.

Any list will result in capsizing from that triply-superfiring main battery far before the engineering compartments can finish flooding! :)
 
Where is the magazine for the midship turret? Since the engines are below it the magazine must be in the superstructure above the waterline. How is that going to work out? Seriously I think the ships I drew in class when I was in 4th grade were better than this!
 
Where is the magazine for the midship turret? Since the engines are below it the magazine must be in the superstructure above the waterline. How is that going to work out? Seriously I think the ships I drew in class when I was in 4th grade were better than this!
I still do those, and they still look the same (On paper). Art is NOT my strong point! lol

:❤: drawing programs!
 
from pure layman's pov, what's useful on these? what is considered the minimum caliber to qualify as dp gun before it essentially is an AA gun?
 
from pure layman's pov, what's useful on these? what is considered the minimum caliber to qualify as dp gun before it essentially is an AA gun?
Usually minimum caliber for a DP gun is 100mm/3.9", though that is marginal and depends on perception, some heavier pieces still considered pure AA, really depends on the mount design, but nothing smaller than 100mm/3.9" is considered DP in the era

What is useful? Sheer size, good internal compartmentalization in the sense that each boiler/engine has its own compartment
 
Things that leap out.

The aft mast is telescopic. That will do your comms a world of good. Flags old boy.

Insert, item 3. Gas Turbine and blower?

Rounded surfaces mean that a shell always hits at 90 degrees?

Extra protection for barrettes :D

Concealed boats forward. No so concealed boats amidships.

The American ship in the insert is a carrier :)
 
another slight design flaw, the rounded side was intended to deflect Torpedoes above the water line, good idea. But also to deflect torpedoes further underwater, really really bad idea
 
Now personally I'd prefer a 4/3/2 layout fore and aft and no midships turret. Maybe 6" secondaries and an extensive 3" heavy AA tertiary battery. In the EDCverse it should be around late in the Eastern war, just as improved airpower and guided weapons dooms the battleline...
Well I would simply go for 8 guns 4/4 and 4.5"secondaries but what do I know....I mean you might only get two for the cost of this thing?
 
Well I would simply go for 8 guns 4/4 and 4.5"secondaries but what do I know....I mean you might only get two for the cost of this thing?
Probably. But it'd be the first new British capital ship after the Troubles and the fall of the monarchy. Plus they'd be leading the wrong lessons from the Eastern War regarding the new capital ship/airpower relationship. It looks like it could survive an air attack.
 
another slight design flaw, the rounded side was intended to deflect Torpedoes above the water line, good idea. But also to deflect torpedoes further underwater, really really bad idea
Kinda depends if the tinfish detonates or not..... Who is she up against and when? lol
 
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