Fuuuuuuck. I just turned off my computer.

That is minor problem, the major is that William Ketter, whom Sophie of Prussia married was never duke of whole Courland, he divided the Duchy with his brother Friedrich (unless you plan to kill Friederich off), though it'd be interesting if Jacob Kettler was the first cousin of much richer King of Poland, it'd mean that he'd receive serious backing in his colonial plans and PLC could enter colonisation.
 
Interesting update! Looks like the Polish Valois are going to get to rule Prussia too! So no Prussia-Brandenburg Union it seems.
 
Interesting update! Looks like the Polish Valois are going to get to rule Prussia too! So no Prussia-Brandenburg Union it seems.

I'd bet that duke of Prussia would become Prince of Wales-like title granted to eldest son of king of Poland when his father is still alive.
 
I'd bet that duke of Prussia would become Prince of Wales-like title granted to eldest son of king of Poland when his father is still alive.
Hmm, that’s interesting but what’s the exact title? Prince of Prussia sounds cools but what about Grand Prince of Prussia or Grandduke of Prussia?
 
Hmm, that’s interesting but what’s the exact title? Prince of Prussia sounds cools but what about Grand Prince of Prussia or Grandduke of Prussia?

There was no tradition of Grand Ducal title in Prussia, so I suppose that they'll go with already existing title of "duke of Prussia" so in Polish "książę Prus" (and Polish doesn't have different word for royal prince and aristocratic duke, they're both called "książę")
 
There was no tradition of Grand Ducal title in Prussia, so I suppose that they'll go with already existing title of "duke of Prussia" so in Polish "książę Prus" (and Polish doesn't have different word for royal prince and aristocratic duke, they're both called "książę")
Oh I see so ksiażę would be Polish title and Royal Prince the English title?
 
I just wanna point out that it wouldn't be Prince of Prussia. To have the title of the heir be a Princedom, it needs to have been a former kingdom/country. Asturias, title of the spanish heir, was a medieval kingdom, and Wales is a country.
 
I just wanna point out that it wouldn't be Prince of Prussia. To have the title of the heir be a Princedom, it needs to have been a former kingdom/country. Asturias, title of the spanish heir, was a medieval kingdom, and Wales is a country.
But Prussia was an independent Duchy. Besides Girona wasn’t a country and the Aragonese used that, same goes from the Dauphin.
 
I just wanna point out that it wouldn't be Prince of Prussia. To have the title of the heir be a Princedom, it needs to have been a former kingdom/country. Asturias, title of the spanish heir, was a medieval kingdom, and Wales is a country.

It doesn't matter. In Polish, the title sounds the same regardless whether it's princedom or dukedom (so "książę") and TTL English translation would probably be technically wrong, but who cares? They would just go to Poland, notice that heir to the throne has title associated with Prussia and would assume that it's princely.
 
It doesn't matter. In Polish, the title sounds the same regardless whether it's princedom or dukedom (so "książę") and TTL English translation would probably be technically wrong, but who cares? They would just go to Poland, notice that heir to the throne has title associated with Prussia and would assume that it's princely.
True actually, we English speakers have a thing for translating a name wrong but sticking with it anyhow, lol x'D
 
Chapter Forty - Philip I New
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A Burgundian map of the Siege of Pernambuco.

On 13 September 1594, one thousand Spaniards arrived on the shores of Recife, Pernambuco. There, they met with the other two thousand that had already arrived over the past few months and reinforced the ongoing siege of Recife and Olinda, two of the major cities of the captaincy. This was the start of the Spanish side of the Colonial War against Portugal, a direct follow-up of the War of the Triple Alliance.

To maintain the siege, Spain sent over sixty ships, led by the Reina Catalina and the Santa María, to prevent anyone from leaving the two cities and any assistance from coming in. This was done because, at the time, Pernambuco was the largest and richest sugar-producing area in the world. Its prime position and importance to the Portuguese crown meant it was highly desirable by the enemies of Philip I, which explained the sudden need of Philip III to gain it.

The siege, which started in August was short-lived, lasting just under two months before the officials of the two cities surrendered on the first of October, 1594. Alexander Farnese, the Duke of Parma, led the assault on the city, sacking Recife and Olinda of all its riches, which included mounts of unrefined sugar that were worth around one million reals. Because of his brutality, Alexander Farnese, or Alexandre Farnésio in Portuguese is still known as o Terrível in Pernambuco or the Terrible. It’s rumored that around a thousand Portuguese Brazilians, women, and children including, were killed by his hand, but the number of just a hundred is more likely.

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A brazilwood tree.

The fleet returned victorious to Spain, leaving 1,500 men in Brazil to control the conquered land. They brought a bulk of cotton, sugar, brazilwood, and expensive merchandise. To celebrate the conquest, King Philip declared a month of festivities in Madrid with masques, parties, and feasts to commemorate the defeat of the enemies of Spain.

But the Portuguese were not humiliated by the defeat. Instead, King Philip worked to secure his personal rule, and win back the lost lands in the Americas. As his court celebrated his brother’s wedding to Elizabeth of Braganza, he began to plan his return to power.

The two most powerful noble families of Portugal were the Lencastres and the Braganzas, the latter of whom were already on Philip's side. Unfortunately, Philip's youngest brother, Prince Francis, had been dedicated to the church at a young age and the king's own religion prevented him from marrying his brother before he took his vows.

Instead, in early 1595, King Philip promised his daughter, Infanta Maria, to the son and heir of Afonso de Albuquerque, 3rd Duke of Goa, a boy of just four years also called Afonso. This pleased the Albuquerques, who had been mostly ignored by King Sebastian and would one day bring them to the line of succession when Maria eventually had children with her husband.

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Coat of arms of the Dukes of Goa.

With two powerful families by his side, Philip felt secure in performing a coup d'etat against his mother and her lover, the Duke of Aveiro. Just before midnight, on 13, March 1595, King Philip and fifty guardsmen overpowered the guards of the Duke of Aveiro and Queen Margaret, who were found sleeping in the same bed. There, Philip announced their arrests for charges of conspiracy and sedition against the King, charges which were treasonous according to Portuguese law at the time. As evidence, Philip produced a letter written by his mother to George of Lencastre, planning the continuation of the regency despite his majority in 1589.

Queen Margaret was put under house arrest at the Castle of Palmela in Lisbon, where she was forbidden to write to anyone and was kept under vigilant guard by men loyal to her son. Saddened by what she saw as a filial betrayal, she began to write her entire memoirs, detailing her childhood, arrival in Lisbon, and her relationship with the Duke of Aveiro. The book, published years later, was censored in Portugal and Philip was known to have never read it.

Despite her imprisonment, however, Margaret was still treated according to her rank as queen and her status as the King’s mother. George of Lencastre, on the other hand, was thrown in prison, where he would face charges of treason.

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Queen Margaret's memoirs.
 
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