As Dreamers Do: American Magic Redux

Now that you mention it, I wouldn't mind having Hasbro deal with Nintendo for its early years. I mean, we could have a Hanafuda following in the United States if the two were successful enough together to bring the Big N's pre-gaming toys to the U.S.A.! Not to mention either better marketing for, or even another country with families to purchase the Ultra-Hand for their kids.
Also....I don't think "Hasbro" existed back then...
They were still "Parker Brothers" and "Milton Bradley" until the mid-late '90s I think...

But I like the idea though.
 
Also....I don't think "Hasbro" existed back then...
Actually, Hasbro existed since 1968. Heck, if you want to get technical, they started in 1923 thanks to a trio of Polish-Jewish brothers in Rhode Island. Yes, really.


So, in other words, using Nintendo's beloved characters to give Hasbro an earlier start in the gaming industry would sound actually good. I mean, if Namco can own a hockey team, then Nintendo can partner with a toy company.
 
Actually, Hasbro existed since 1968. Heck, if you want to get technical, they started in 1923 thanks to a trio of Polish-Jewish brothers in Rhode Island. Yes, really.


So, in other words, using Nintendo's beloved characters to give Hasbro an earlier start in the gaming industry would sound actually good. I mean, if Namco can own a hockey team, then Nintendo can partner with a toy company.
Oh, huh...I coulda sworn I remembered them only being formed by the merger....whelp, I'm wrong.

Hmm.....ya know...having Nintendo and Hasbro being partners might actually lead to a game like Jackel or Contra being called "G.I. Joe" for its console release...at least its NES release...it might have its regular arcade name if it gets a Tengen release for other consoles.
 
Hmm.....ya know...having Nintendo and Hasbro being partners might actually lead to a game like Jackal or Contra being called "G.I. Joe" for its console release...at least its NES release...it might have its regular arcade name if it gets a Tengen release for other consoles.
I looked up the Jackal game after reading this, and if I didn't already want to spare Contra from its potential renaming, I most certainly do now.
 
I think Touchstone should try importing European films to America. Or maybe Hyperion could try importing a few French films and the like. I don't know much about French films, so I can't suggest a beginning, but that would be a start.

Oh yeah, and I think Touchstone should have all OTL Touchstone films just because.
 
Hey, @OldNavy1988? I have two questions to ask.

1: Since people are begging to own a piece of the legacy, what is the filmography of Lucasfilm Ltd. up to this point?

Lucasfilm Ltd. filmography
American Graffiti (1973; Hyperion)
Star Wars (1977; 20th Century-Fox)
The Making of Star Wars (1977, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
The Star Wars Holiday Special (1978, TV Special) (In association with 20th Television)
More American Graffiti (1979; Hyperion)
Kagemusha (1980; Hyperion) (English Version)
The Empire Strikes Back (1980; 20th Century-Fox)
SP FX: The Empire Strikes Back (1980, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981; 20th Century-Fox)
Body Heat (1981; Warner Bros.)
Return of the Jedi (1983; 20th Century-Fox)
Classic Creatures: Return of the Jedi (1983, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
Twice Upon a Time (1983; Grand Diamond/Ladd Company)

Upcoming
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984; 20th Century-Fox)
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985; Warner Bros.)
Star Wars: Droids (1985) (Animated series produced by Grantray-Lawrence and 20th Television)
Labyrinth (1986; Touchstone)
Howard the Duck (1986; 20th Century-Fox)
Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988; Zoetrope Studios)
Caravan of Courage (TBA)
Radioland Murders (TBA)
Strange Magic (TBA)
Red Tails (TBA)
Willow (TBA)

Current Lucasfilm, Ltd. assets
Industrial Light and Magic (ILM)
Skywalker Sound
Fantasound (25%; Co-owned with Sony, Disney and Dolby)
Lucasfilm Games
Lucasfilm Computer Division/The Graphics Group​
 

Lucasfilm Ltd. filmography
American Graffiti (1973; Hyperion)
Star Wars (1977; 20th Century-Fox)
The Making of Star Wars (1977, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
The Star Wars Holiday Special (1978, TV Special) (In association with 20th Television)
More American Graffiti (1979; Hyperion)
Kagemusha (1980; Hyperion) (English Version)
The Empire Strikes Back (1980; 20th Century-Fox)
SP FX: The Empire Strikes Back (1980, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981; 20th Century-Fox)
Body Heat (1981; Warner Bros.)
Return of the Jedi (1983; 20th Century-Fox)
Classic Creatures: Return of the Jedi (1983, documentary) (In association with 20th Television)
Twice Upon a Time (1983; Grand Diamond/Ladd Company)

Upcoming
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984; 20th Century-Fox)
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985; Warner Bros.)
Star Wars: Droids (1985) (Animated series produced by Grantray-Lawrence and 20th Television)
Labyrinth (1986; Touchstone)
Howard the Duck (1986; 20th Century-Fox)
Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988; Zoetrope Studios)
Caravan of Courage (TBA)
Radioland Murders (TBA)
Strange Magic (TBA)
Red Tails (TBA)
Willow (TBA)

Current Lucasfilm, Ltd. assets
Industrial Light and Magic (ILM)
Skywalker Sound
Fantasound (25%; Co-owned with Sony, Disney and Dolby)
Lucasfilm Games
Lucasfilm Computer Division/The Graphics Group​
Given the circumstances of Lucasfilm as a whole, here's what I would do...

First and foremost, I'd have Disney outright buy Lucasfilm, Ltd. I know it doesn't make sense, but they managed to buy Marvel and Fox when they were at their most vulnerable, and look at those companies now!

Second, I'd buy Sony and Dolby's shares in Fantasound, then fold the whole thing into Skywalker Sound. That way, Skywalker Sound can double its workforce, while Fantasound can go down on a high note in the long run. Plus, it's just unnatural to have TWO sound-related assets in one studio!

Third, I'd rename the Lucasfilm Computer Division(AKA: The Graphics Group) to Pixar, and make Lucasfilm Games's projects as Atari exclusives. Doing the former would be par for the course, as that was what really happened to give the CGI powerhouse its humble beginnings as an independent studio, while doing the latter would cause the competition to worry that their own successes might not be good enough. I mean, Star Wars AND Indiana Jones as Atari exclusives?!? They'd be quaking in their shoes and clucking like roosters by New Years!

Fourth, I would still have films like Labyrinth and Tucker: The Man and His Dream be released by their respective distributors, and even sell the rights to the former to Henson Associates, but any Lucasfilm feature after Tucker would be released by Fox, Hyperion, or any of Disney's other divisions.

Finally, I know that this isn't a suggestion, but really a question, but is THX butterflied away as a sound studio?
 
Given the circumstances of Lucasfilm as a whole, here's what I would do...

First and foremost, I'd have Disney outright buy Lucasfilm, Ltd. I know it doesn't make sense, but they managed to buy Marvel and Fox when they were at their most vulnerable, and look at those companies now!

Second, I'd buy Sony and Dolby's shares in Fantasound, then fold the whole thing into Skywalker Sound. That way, Skywalker Sound can double its workforce, while Fantasound can go down on a high note in the long run. Plus, it's just unnatural to have TWO sound-related assets in one studio!

Third, I'd rename the Lucasfilm Computer Division(AKA: The Graphics Group) to Pixar, and make Lucasfilm Games's projects as Atari exclusives. Doing the former would be par for the course, as that was what really happened to give the CGI powerhouse its humble beginnings as an independent studio, while doing the latter would cause the competition to worry that their own successes might not be good enough. I mean, Star Wars AND Indiana Jones as Atari exclusives?!? They'd be quaking in their shoes and clucking like roosters by New Years!

Fourth, I would still have films like Labyrinth and Tucker: The Man and His Dream be released by their respective distributors, and even sell the rights to the former to Henson Associates, but any Lucasfilm feature after Tucker would be released by Fox, Hyperion, or any of Disney's other divisions.

Finally, I know that this isn't a suggestion, but really a question, but is THX butterflied away as a sound studio?

Fantasound is the THX of TTL. Basically, a sound system standard to reproduce a film's soundtrack as the sound designer intended.

Skywalker Sound provides sound effects libraries and sound design, recording and mixing facilities to filmmakers employing their services.
 
Fantasound is the THX of TTL.
As someone who was, and still is, afraid of the THX logo, you have no idea how happy I am to see that the accursed logo has been butterflied away and replaced with something that represents one of Walt Disney the First's crowning achievements!

I suppose I'll add this to the list of reasons why TTL is much better than OTL, along with "Walt Disney having a biological child" and "John K. is ousted in the 80's".
 
Personally I think Lucasfilm should stay independent. Meanwhile, the Graphics Group should be sold to Virgin, Turner, Microsoft, Hasbro, Mattel, Sony, Panasonic, Gulf & Western, Time, MCA, or Viacom.
 
So, I had this idea for a movie. It's about a teenage superspy named Max Ryder. (I've had that name in the back of my head since 4th grade.) He also has a sister named Molly. Oh yeah, and a second sister named Moxie. (I know it's kind of a strange name.) His parents are named Charlie and Emma.
 
So, I had this idea for a movie. It's about a teenage superspy named Max Ryder. (I've had that name in the back of my head since 4th grade.) He also has a sister named Molly. Oh yeah, and a second sister named Moxie. (I know it's kind of a strange name.) His parents are named Charlie and Emma.
Not gonna lie, this seems tailor-made for a TV show. Maybe the movie comes first, and the show follows the film's plot?
 
The real question is why did so many John Hughes movies have Chrysler cars in them? I think every family in The Breakfast Club except the "princess"' had a Chrysler product, and Ferris's mom also did. Was it some paid product placement deal, or did he just like Chryslers.
 
Has John Lasseter met Joe Ranft (Whose IOTL death is also hopefully butterflied away like it was in the original "AM" thread) yet? Is so, hopefully Joe is restraining John from being inappropriate around women. I say this because I recall Brainbin over on the "Jim Henson at Disney" thread that Ranft was Lasseter's conscience...
 
Has John Lasseter met Joe Ranft (Whose IOTL death is also hopefully butterflied away like it was in the original "AM" thread) yet? Is so, hopefully Joe is restraining John from being inappropriate around women. I say this because I recall Brainbin over on the "Jim Henson at Disney" thread that Ranft was Lasseter's conscience...

Yes, Joe and John have met. Both have been at Famous Studios, where they've worked together on A Wrinkle in Time and Woody Woodpecker: Behind the Laughter.
 
Yes, Joe and John have met. Both have been at Famous Studios, where they've worked together on A Wrinkle in Time and Woody Woodpecker: Behind the Laughter.
So, if Lasseter and Ranft met at Universal's animation division, and even worked together on a 1983 feature, does this mean that Pixar is radically different than IOTL, if not butterflied away outright?
 
Entertainment News for January 1984
The last few months of speculation pointed to corporate raiders like Saul Steinberg and Carl Icahn as frontrunners to buy Lucasfilm, Ltd., break it up and sell the parts for a profit. Such speculation arose when it was reported that George Lucas was putting his filmmaking assets for sale to facilitate his divorce settlement.

But now, we can finally put all the speculation and hype to rest as Lucas has accepted a last minute, $43 million USD bid from Amblin Entertainment. For now, 20th Century-Fox, a Disney subsidiary, retains the distribution rights to the Star Wars trilogy and the upcoming follow-up to Raiders of the Lost Ark. But in the coming months, Amblin will gain the rights to produce merchandise and further film installments for each property. Amblin will also gain custody of Lucasfilm Games, The Graphics Group, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic and Lucasfilm's stake of the Fantasound process.
- The New York Times; January 3, 1984

Super Bowl VIII (Tampa, FL): The Los Angeles Raiders dominate the Washington Heroes in the first-ever shut out in a Super Bowl.
- The Los Angeles Times
 
Top