Arthur I, by the Grace of God

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by desmirelle, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. VVD0D95 Lemmy is God.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2015
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    Technically he'd be Arthur I, due to the numbering being from the norman conquest.
     
  2. isabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    He will be likely King Arthur of England, being the first king of that name and will became King Arthur the First only after the start of the reign of another King Arthur of England (if his eldest son his named Arthur and became king after him, just after his death)
     
  3. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    Just to make it easier:


    Prologue

    As the eldest son of King Henry VII, Prince Arthur, Prince of Wales, was well-trained in the art of ruling. His father had kept him near at hand and shown him what was necessary to rule. He learned that frugality was a necessity to keep a full treasury, to know who your enemies are and keep a close eye upon them, reward those who support you, use land and titles to encourage those who are indifferent or wavering to come to your side. He learned to ride, to fight, to pray and to be seen doing all. England and Wales were surrounded by enemies and if Arthur could not hold his throne, he would end up like his father’s predecessor Richard III – dead with an enemy on the throne.


    Other lessons he learned from his father were not ones Henry VII intended to teach. Henry VII had, at his mother’s urging, wed Elizabeth of York to unite the factions fighting for the throne. He repealed Titulus Regulus, which justified Richard’s kingship – but only after making sure none of Elizabeth’s brother were alive to provide a rallying cry against Henry’s reign. Henry was polite enough to his wife, but saw her only during court functions or when visiting her chambers when she was not pregnant – and seemed to find that duty less enticing than other men. What interested Henry VII was power and control. What interested Arthur was his own belief that a king should be more interested in the welfare of his people than being a cheap, bitter man who believed everyone was after his crown. But then, Arthur didn’t have to fight for one.



    Arthur had been born on 20 September 1486, a honeymoon baby, which his formidable grandmother, “Mother of the King” Margaret Beaufort Tudor Stafford Stanley (there had been a marriage before Edmund Tudor, to John de la Pole, but it had not been consummated - she was born in 1443 and been annulled in 1453 - and one mentioned it to her at one’s peril). She had carried a vision for her only child, Henry Tudor from his birth and everything she had done had been to make him king.

    Like his father, Arthur's bride was chosen for political, rather than romantic, reasons. Catalina of Aragon and Castile, youngest daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, was selected after long negotiations and proxy marriages in 1497 (after the receipt of a papal dispensation because of their ages) and in 1499, King Henry VII told the King and Queen of Spain that the marriage would not take place the following year, on Arthur’s fourteenth birthday, because of his personal worries about Arthur being ‘too enamored’ of his bride. Henry suggested that he would inform them when Arthur was capable of being a proper husband.

    Ferdinand understood Henry’s reluctance. It was precisely what he believed happened to his son, John, in 1497. But Isabella was suspicious, especially when Henry declined to have Catalina in England until Henry VII thought Arthur was ready. She confided her suspicious to her husband. Being underhanded and duplicitous in nature himself, he was easily persuaded that she was correct.

    August – September 1500
    On 1 August 1500, Queen Isabella and her retinue arrived with Catalina for the wedding (which Isabella smilingly said she believed set for Arthur’s 14th birthday on 20 September that year), and was welcomed by King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth. Elizabeth diffused what could have been an awkward situation with the suggestion that the wedding take place, the wedding night be allowed and when Isabella left for home, the couple be separated for health’s sake until the time was right. Reluctantly, Henry agreed, still not believing that Isabella had ‘misread’ the letters.


    Isabella left England in good spirits, despite leaving a daughter behind. Queen Elizabeth had promised to look after Catalina as if she were her own daughter and Isabella believed her. She returned to Spain in much better spirits than she’d been in quite a while and Ferdinand decided it had been a good thing, seeing Catalina married with her own eyes.

    In England, Henry VII was as good as his word: Arthur and Cat (as he called his bride), were given separate living quarters and the interpreter explained to each Henry VII’s reasoning for it. After what had happened to her brother, Catalina understood it better than did Arthur. Arthur wasn’t pleased, but was obedient. Henry also informed them that Catherine (as he called her) would be learning English so that when the couple went to Wales in the coming spring, she could speak with courtiers without an interpreter. Arthur insisted that he also learn Spanish, something Henry found ridiculous, but his wife thought was ‘sweet’ and asked him, as personal favor, to permit it, as it proved their son was kind and wise, wanting his wife to feel not so alone in a foreign land. Arthur never saw this side of his father, who conceded his wife’s request without much more than a sigh.

    October 1500 – 25 June 1501
    The six nights together from the nuptials until Isabella’s departure from court (escorted by Henry himself) had been enough. By the end of October, Elizabeth was sure her new daughter was pregnant, and by the end of November, everyone else was as well. The first person to be notified officially, was Isabella – by Queen Elizabeth herself. Elizabeth informed the Spanish Queen that Catalina was now in her own household, to keep a close eye on her personally, so that no evil might befall the child. Elizabeth also told Isabella that she would go into confinement with ‘their’ daughter (having first informed Henry, who thought it a wise decision).


    Catalina’s pregnancy held the usual: morning sickness, swollen feet, food cravings, and being spoiled by one and all. Henry VII seemed more excited than the couple: his house was continuing. His mother was also excited and was busying herself planning the confinement and christening. When Cat asked the Queen if they shouldn’t be involved in these things as well, Elizabeth told her that in all probability this would be the only great-grandchild she would see and, in an aside, would keep ‘The Mother of the King’ from bothering them with advice. (Margaret had only gone through one pregnancy, at age 13, and been unable to conceive thereafter, while Elizabeth had seven pregnancies under her belt.)

    As the date of the confinement approached, Henry VII began experiencing pains in his left arm and chest; the doctors attributed it to the excitement of the coming child and his concerns about his petite Spanish daughter. The Mother of the King led Princess Catherine, Princess of Wales, into her confinement quarters, where Queen Elizabeth was already waiting (to avoid the appearance of upstaging her husband’s formidable mother), on 4 June 1501.

    Eighteen days later, Henry VII’s body, hands clenched over his chest and a grimace on his face, was found stiff and cold in bed. It was the 23rd of June and England had a new king.


    As Queen, Elizabeth had to be informed, so a letter was taken to her. She read it, folded it, and put it into her bodice as if it were a letter of no import and continued her lunch with Catalina. She had decided not to tell her expectant daughter, but the young woman had been raised royal.

    “Who has died?” she asked in her heavily accented English.

    “My husband. You are Queen now, my love.”

    “Then you need to go?”

    Elizabeth shook her head. “I cannot go to the funeral, you know that. I am more use to you here for now. I will send a letter to Arthur to find out what he wishes, will that make you happier?”

    “Si.”

    It turned out that Elizabeth could not remain with Cat. While Arthur carried himself with dignity and gravity appropriate for a king, Henry VII’s mother could not believe that God had allowed her son to die after so few years on the throne. She alternated between praying face down in front of the altar to crying uncontrollably with her ladies helplessly trying to comfort her to angry outburst. She informed Arthur she would guide him. That was when he sent for his mother.

    -

    Dowager Queen Elizabeth of York was in a large tub of cooling water sobbing almost uncontrollably when Lady Agnes Howard entered with a drying cloth and the letter from King Arthur. She was shocked to see Her Lady in such a state. She helped Elizabeth compose herself and dry off before giving her the letter. Arthur had been proclaimed King the day his father had been found; that was not the trouble. ‘The Mother of the King’ Margaret Stanley was uncontrollable. The woman who flinched at nothing, not even when her husband’s life was at stake for opposing her son, had broken.

    “The convent,” Elizabeth advised her son. “She needs to go there, at once. She cannot attend the funeral, it would break tradition.” Arthur listened and agreed. Lord Thomas Howard escorted her and her ladies to the convent where she traditionally stayed. Upon his return, he reported that the Countess of Richmond and Derby had continued the states of prayer and hysteria all the way to Collyweston.


    26 June 1501 – December 1507

    Catherine gave birth to her son the day Elizabeth advised her son to send his grandmother to convent. Arthur was going to name him Henry, after his father, but his mother counseled him to leave Henry for his younger brother’s firstborn son. She suggested Edmund for Arthur’s grandfather, but Catherine suggested Edward, for the Dowager Queen’s late brother. A letter given to Lord Howard by the Countess of Richmond and Derby, ‘commanded’ the king to name the child after himself – a second Arthur, to continue the coming revelations of wisdom and luck which were coming for King Arthur I (she had had a vision, the letter told him). The Dowager Queen advised her son to humor his grandmother, and name the second son Edward (Arthur had been willing to let his beloved Cat decide, but when she learned of Margaret’s ‘command’, asked him to honor his grandmother as well.) The christening of Arthur took place a week after his grandfather’s funeral, with the Dowager Queen as primary godmother (representing Isabella as well). The godfathers included King Louis of France and King James of Scotland both represented by their ambassadors.


    Margaret, Countess of Richmond and Derby, recovered and decided there was a need for a regency led and guided by her, aided by ‘select’ noblemen. Her chief opponent in this was none other than Lord Thomas Howard, son of John Norfolk, who had supported Richard III and died with him at Bosworth. Margaret not only left the convent and returned to court without permission, but brought with her husband, Thomas Stanley, Earl of Derby and nearly 400 men at arms, Howard and his 100-odd men held them outside London until the King’s pleasure was known. King Arthur allowed his grandmother, and her ladies to enter, but refused her husband and his men entry. Stanley was ordered ‘by the king’ (via Howard) to return home, but would not leave, as he said he had sworn to his wife he would remain where she needed him. When Margaret ordered the king to allow Stanley to head the regency with her, Arthur’s reply was one he had been suggested by his mother: He restored Howard to the Norfolk Dukedom and ordered him to escort Stanley – alone – inside to join his wife. With Stanley gone, the men dispersed. Margaret was furious and verbally abused not only Arthur, but his Spanish wife, his ungrateful mother and insisted that she, along with her husband, would have been the rational choice by her late son to head the ‘necessary’ regency. King Arthur decided that the Duke of Norfolk would escort the Countess of Richmond and Derby back to the convent, where she was to stay until summoned. The Count of Derby, Thomas Stanley would remain in the Tower until Arthur decided if he had intended treason, or, as suggested by the Duke of Norfolk (and both Queens) that he was simply a man ruled by his wife.


    Stanley was not a man who could stand up to the likes of Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk. Norfolk, no matter what his status, was the King’s man – no matter who the king was. Stanley told the Duke that his wife had only asked him to join him when she entered London to ‘discuss’ the regency with Dowager Queen Elizabeth; he brought his men without her request: he showed the missive she’d sent him. Howard told the king several things about Stanley: that Stanley had changed over the years and was no longer the powerful man he had once been, that Stanley meant nothing unless his wife meant for him to, and he had no idea what she’d wanted him to mean, and that it might be wise to grant Stanley’s title to his son and to retain Stanley in the tower until the Queen had gave birth to her next healthy child – be that the next pregnancy or the one after that – to send a message to anyone else who questioned Arthur’s ability to rule.

    Arthur invited George Stanley, Baron Strange, to the court, where he was given his father’s title “With the consent of the current Earl” (who attended and made public pleading that his son take the title). Thomas Stanley, now styled Baron Stanley, returned to the tower to remain at his majesty’s pleasure. George Stanley accepted the title with mixed feelings. He was ordered to take the news of his father’s divesture to his step-mother, with the assurance of the king that she was Dowager Countess of Derby, as if her husband had died, and could continue to style herself Countess of Richmond and Derby. The Mother Superior of the convent received the letter from the new Earl and promised to give it to the King’s grandmother when she was capable; she was still in (in the words of the Mother Superior) “such pain of heart and mind that to tell her these things at this time would be cruel.”


    The second Christmas of Arthur I’s reign found him signing a Treaty of Perpetual Peace with King James IV of Scotland. This treaty included a marriage contract between Arthur’s sister Margaret and James, to ensure the peace. Both kings were skeptical of perpetual peace, but were willing to give it a try. It also brought news from the Queen, who believed herself once more with child. James proposed that if Arthur named his next son after him – the King of Scotland; the second son of James and Margaret would be Arthur, both living symbols of the peace between the two kings. The slight build of Princess Margaret was of concern to Dowager Queen Elizabeth; James agreed to wait until she was fourteen for the formal consummation and to allow her to remain with her mother until then. Elizabeth would accompany the Princess for her wedding in Edinburgh, Christmas 1503. Margaret, who had received jewelry and cloth of gold and silver from James as betrothal gifts, was very sorry to see him leave.


    Margaret, “Grandmother of the King” – as he addressed the letter – was well enough to attend to her granddaughter Catalina (she could not bring herself to call her Cat as Arthur had requested, it lacked the dignity she felt necessary, but Arthur disliked Catherine except for public occasions) during her second confinement. It was into her hands that the second son of Arthur was born on 16 September 1502. Her husband, now Baron Stanley, was released for the christening, where he stood as representative for godfather James of Scotland. He then announced that he intended to enter a monastery, near to where his wife was living; that her example had shown him the evil of the world and its temptations. With the blessing of the King and Queen, he withdrew from court. Margaret, on the other hand, accepted the invitation of her grandson to oversee the education of the royal nursery. She had already established schools and was more than happy to forsake the convent for the future of England.

    The Dowager Queen of England had proved to have learned much from her upbringing, relations, and marriage to Henry VII – although she told her son she had married Henry at the insistence of their mothers, but grew to be fond of him. She advised Arthur not to wait long to betroth his younger brother Henry, Duke of York; Henry was a handful and taller and more muscular than his older brother. Elizabeth confided a secret to Arthur, one Margaret “Grandmother of the King” confirmed: Henry had a crush on Catalina.

    King Louis XII of France was suspicious of the “Treaty of Perpetual Peace” signed between Scotland and England; he wrote King James IV on the subject and received a letter back assuring him of the ‘Auld Alliance’ still standing but reminding the French King that James had asked for and been turned down for the hand of his daughter Claude – his only surviving child so far. Louis was furious; he had offered James Suzanne de Bourbon, daughter of Louis XI, only to have the Scottish King to decide he didn’t want to wait for the sickly girl to come of age, especially since (like Margaret Tudor), Louis wished to wait until she was fourteen. Margaret had a year and a half on Suzanne, and, according to the reports from his ambassadors, was ‘pale and without fire’. James liked fire in his women and saw it, unawakened, in Princess Margaret Tudor.


    Baron Stanley’s death at the monastery in May 1503 occurred the say day as Catalina’s first miscarriage. Catalina was inconsolable until her English mother Elizabeth told her about her miscarriages and pointed out that she still had two sons: Margaret Stanley, “Grandmother of the King” had never fallen pregnant after giving birth to her son Henry; Catalina had been spared that fate.

    In Scotland, King James received a letter from the French king requesting an agreement that in the next generation; a Scottish royal daughter would wed a French royal son or the other way around. After consultation with councilors (which did not include the English), he agreed. The fate of one of Princess Margaret’s children had been decided before her arrival in Scotland.

    In June, the Duke of Norfolk headed an army which landed in Ireland to stop what was becoming an inter-clan war there. Preferring to be nearer the king, he recommended his son Edmund for Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and left a country he personally thought was inhabited by Englishmen and savage. Lord Edmund lasted all of six months and then fell ill; it was thought he would die, but he recovered and was recalled to England, to the household of the Duke of York. Sir Edward Poynings replaced him.

    The ladies of the royal court were primarily interested in the wardrobe of Princess Margaret, who was start her journey north in September (with her mother), in a slow and leisurely progress designed to deliver her on the first of December to her bridegroom. The Princess’ prattling about how she was to be Queen of Scotland was endless and annoying: her mother finally forbade her to speak of it except while she helped sew on the dresses or between the evening meal and her bedtime – unless asked about it by her mother, her grandmother or her sister the Queen of England. Catalina seemed to have endless patience for her English sister’s excitement; making the Dowager Queen wish she could have silenced her eldest daughter more thoroughly. Finally, September arrived and the entourage was underway.

    Scotland was pleased with the marriage, in January, there were still celebrations here and there. Margaret had found the marriage night traumatic, as did many girls, but she recovered well and missed her courses in January; which turned out to be a false alarm, as they resumed in February. However, in March she missed them again and this time was not an alarm: come Christmas, Arthur was not the only Tudor who would have a child.

    Jamie (James) beat Isabella of England into the world by days. He arrived on the 15th and she on the 20th. They were betrothed at birth to one another, to Louis’ dismay. Arthur and James had decided upon this as a furthering of the ‘Treaty of Perpetual Peace’, since many viewed the treaty with cynicism.

    Henry, Duke of York, was 13 when his niece Isabella was born. He was handsome, well-built, and sure of himself and took advantage of this while Arthur’s queen was confined. By the time she came out, in February, he was going to be a father himself: Lady Elizabeth Boleyn, wife of courier Sir Thomas Boleyn and already mother of four living children (although one, the second child and first boy, was ailing and not long for the world). Her husband complained to the King in April, when they were sure of the pregnancy. Boleyn was not the father; he had been on the continent at the time of conception. Elizabeth admitted to her mistress that the only possible father was the Duke of York. Arthur made Boleyn Viscount Rochford and gave him additional lands; something he did not do for the family of the laudress who showed up with child before the birth of the Boleyn boy Henry. Born Sarah Miller, Sally gave birth without a husband, although for a promotion within the stables, Edward Danielson was willing to give her daughter a father and his name. Katherine Danielson was born on June 12th, exactly five months after Henry Boleyn. Arthur censured his brother and fined him the yearly income from his estates (to be held for future bastards); which Henry thought selfish and arrogant of his brother. He turned fourteen on the 28th of June and declined the bride offered by the King’s Advisory Council (Lady Elizabeth Howard, born in 1497; he would have to wait 1509 to wed her); he requested a Princess, as ‘befitted the son of a great King’.


    Arthur was, to say the least, exasperated with his brother. Their mother was only person (besides Cat, and Henry made her uncomfortable with his attempts at flirtation with her) Henry would listen to, so Arthur charged her with bringing him into line. She succeeded, much to everyone’s surprised, by using the leeway Arthur had granted her: if Henry expected to be in a regency council (Henry was convinced he was meant to govern), he would have to go through the same educational process that Arthur had under Henry VII. To that end, he would first go to Ireland, under the experience of Poynings (and forbidden to use his royal status) to learn the art of balancing conflicting interests in governing. So, to Ireland he went.

    And came home escorted by Poynings himself less than six months later. It seemed that Henry liked one of the FitzGerald girls. As the good-will of these particular FitzGeralds were necessary to the peace, Sir Edward brought the Duke of York back to the King personally so that there would be no miscommunication on what happened. Henry claimed the ‘lass was willing’ and Sir Edward informed the king that the lass’ brothers heard her scream and found the Duke atop her, trying to get her skirts up while she was trying to hold them down. She had a bruise on her face from a slap Henry had landed, which earned the Duke the first beating he’d had since his father had caught him writing in the chapel’s large Bible. The bruising on Henry’s face had not completely healed and the yellowish tinge of his face enraged his grandmother. But not the way he thought it would. Before anyone could stop her, Margaret Beaufort Stanley, “Grandmother of the King” was chasing her much-larger grandson about the room, swatting him with the broadside of a courtier’s sword and threatening to make another Abelard of him if he couldn’t behave as a prince of the realm. The Duke of York finally ran behind his mother and then exited the room through a door to the King’s quarters. Arthur then asked his Grandmother to stop, as he needed her help on the matter of the nearly-disgraced lass, and she could not help him and his mother with that while she chased ‘that knave’. The Countess then handed back the sword, still looking like thunder. All Elizabeth and Catalina could do was attempt to maintain straight faces, because they desperately wanted to laugh while Arthur and Margaret were furious. None of the quartet were happier half an hour later when Sir Charles Brandon reported that among the Duke of York’s comments were “When I’m King, I will be avenged on those FitzGeralds.” Sir Charles had been a favorite of the Duke’s (and a bit of hero to him, as well), but Brandon was the King’s man first. And the memory of Richard III was quite fresh to all in the room.


    Henry insisted that Brandon had heard him wrong. No one believed him, but as he was the Duke of York and the troubles of the Yorks were still in the memories of the older subjects, Arthur had but one thing to say to his charming brother.

    “I am no Edward IV, to forgive my brother George, nor am I Edward V, to be usurped by a Richard III. Your life is now in your hands. You have disgraced the Tudor name with your actions in Ireland. Nay, say nothing. Another such error of judgment you will not survive. On that you have my oath. So, brother, decide if you be a loyal subject of min or guest of my executioner; that choice I leave to you.”

    Arthur then nodded at his mother, who shook her head, she had naught to say to her wayward son; but when he nodded at the Countess of Richmond and Derby, she had something to say.

    “If you were not my son’s son, I would already be begging for your head. There are eyes upon you Henry, lips that will whisper poison and treason into your ears. The eyes are those who would look to you to support your brother and honor your father’s lifetime of toil to win his crown; the lips belong to no friends of yours, only to those who wish you ill and to bring down the House of Tudor. Heed your brother’s words; my son trained him in the art of kingship and he knows there can be but one king.”

    With that, Henry was dismissed to his rooms at court, under guard.


    The Mary Fortune was good ship and true and her captain knew what to do when Prince Henry, Duke of York, was assigned to her. He told the crew the young man was be addressed as Tudor, like any other new crewman and put into rotation for training. At first, Henry hated it. He hated that no one bowed and that no one paid the least bit of attention to his position or place in line for the throne (one rower told him, “I’m on that list, too, son, but two thousand have to die before I get the head of the line. So, you’d better sit down and learn a trade like I did.”) And then, on a cold, dark, windy night watch with a hint of rain in the air, he realized he liked being liked for being Henry Tudor, hard worker and a sailor who’d never had a hint of the sea-sickness and could pull an oar better than most if needed. He was respected, for the first time in his young life, for what he did and not who his father or brother was, and he liked it.


    Henry would spend two years at sea, heading out just before the quickening of the Queen was announced in November 1505, missing the birth (17 May 1506) and death (25 August 1506) of his nephew Edward. He arrived home in time for the Christmas festivities, 1507, still tall, more muscular and now 16 years old. But he was a different person in many ways: less cocky but with more inner confidence. He immediately began chasing the court ladies again, only to have the Queen request that he spare them until after her confinement (she was due again in late January and would go into confinement the day after the Feast of the Epiphany, which was held on the 6th of January). He cheerfully agreed. It had not been decided whether or not he would return to sea; the advisors to the king wished to see if he’d grown up enough to be trusted. Henry himself wanted to return, but he was gaining rank and things were changing for him in the navy and he knew it. He did not want to make a career at sea and if he continued, that might happen.

    Henry decided to apologize formally to his brother and request that Arthur find him a marriage ‘pleasing in his (Arthur’s) eyes’, saying that any woman his brother found him could not help but be pleasing to Henry. Arthur, after a long contemplation and much discussion with his council of advisors (which he had set up when he first began his rule and kept, liking the idea), told his younger brother that a bride would be found for him.


    January - March 1508
    The queen went into confinement right after the Feast of the Epiphany, among her ladies was Viscountess Rochford, Elizabeth Boleyn, whose son with Prince Henry was being raise with her children at the Boleyn home. Elizabeth had apologized to the queen, but since her husband had been willing to give the boy his name, he had been made Viscount Rochford for his courtesy to the king. On the first of February, Catalina gave birth to another daughter, Elizabeth, so named for the king’s beloved mother. The child was almost immediately called Bitsy, because she was so small and initially not expected to live long. But she survived, and the nickname stuck within the family.

    The betrothal contract between Prince Henry, Duke of York and Eleanor of Austria, niece of Catalina by her sister Joanna, was formalized at the end of January. The pope had granted a dispensation for the marriage in England, but declined the same for her Portuguese relatives, which gave England the edge it needed to make the union possible. Ferdinand, Catalina’s father, made her Duchess of Cadiz, with the revenues (along with a grant from him) and the title for her husband, as the dowry. Arthur, with Catalina’s urging, accepted the match after the properties for revenues were increased and the terms were settled: only the children of Eleanor would be eligible to inherit, but Henry could retain the title if she died and there were no children to assume the title. Henry, true to his word, proclaimed that the Pope could not have a match so pleasing to his person.

    Eleanor would arrive with her ladies (Catalina had explained that the English household had no provision for a male household, unlike the Spanish) in the spring of 1508, giving her time to learn English and English ways before her marriage. The wedding was set for the Christmas of 1510, after the bride had reached her 12th birthday (November), giving both time to become acquainted.


    April – June 1508
    At first, Henry thought the newly-raised Earl of Surrey, Thomas Howard, was a toady to the king, nosing about for chances to regain the family Dukedom (Norfolk), which had been lost when the family backed the loser at Bosworth. He thought the Duke of Buckingham would be a better teacher, but after watching the Duke and listening to him during cards and gambling among the other men, recognized the same arrogance he himself had been filled with before he went to sea. What Henry failed to realize that those traits he despised in Buckingham were still within him. Buckingham, he told Howard, was not long for court if he continued talking as he did. Howard’s only reply was “God willing, that day comes soon.”

    Arthur was negotiating for a piece of the prize the Spanish had been granted beginning with Columbus in the last century. It had been a caveat to the wedding negotiations, but one that had not been settled by the time Eleanor arrived. In May, however, a letter from Regent Ferdinand allowed the English to make a dozen settlements, but well north of the Spanish-established settlements, beginning after the marriage had been performed. That meant Arthur had two years to prepare for one of England’s greatest undertakings.

    The upcoming summer progress would encompass an idea the king had – he would hear the complaints of common subjects and pleas for justice himself when he visited an area. Catalina, going more and more as Catherine, agreed that it was an inspired idea, but cautioned that he should consult the Archbishops of York and Canterbury to determine if he should have church advisors for the same. Arthur thought (and prayed) about the suggestion, but decided against it; he felt it gave the appearance of what his grandmother had wanted, and his mother agreed. Just prior to the progress’ beginning, however, Catherine fell ill and the question of whether or not the progress was going to get underway was solved by the Earl of Surrey, who suggested that the queen remain at Lambert, with his wife, while the Queen Mother attended the king. That way there was still a masculine/feminine balance that the Dowager Queen wanted and the Queen’s health was not compromised further. That decision made, the ‘first summer of the king’s justice’ as it would be come to be called, was underway.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017 at 2:43 AM
    floriane, Shevek23, savemase and 4 others like this.
  4. olavops Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Great to see this TL return.

    So just to recap:
    Arthur Tudor is married to Catherine of Aragon.
    Henry Tudor the Duke of York has married Eleanor of Austria, and has fathered a bastard child with Elizabeth Boleyn called Henry(the Boleyn famiy is even more interesting now!)
    Arthur and Catherine have 3 children i believe, with the youngest being named Elizabeth(i wonder about her hair color)

    Looking foward to seeing this diferent Tudor dinasty unfold.
     
  5. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    Henry, Duke of York, is betrothed to Eleanor, who has arrived to learn English language and manners; the marriage is set for 1510, when she's legal. And you've left out his bastard daughter Katherine (by Sally, who married a groom who got a promotion for doing so)!
     
    olavops likes this.
  6. isabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    A wedding between Henry and Eleanor is really ASB: Eleanor is the eldest granddaughter of the King of Aragon, the Queen of Castile, the Holy Roman Enperor and the Duchess of Burgundy and marry a simple second son without any chance of inhereiting anything? No way her guardians will say yes to this kind of wedding (or to a wedding to her aunts' widower). Remember who Ferdinand has just his namesake in his hand and little Catalina in the convent with her mother whilke the other children of Juana (Eleanor, Karl, Isabella and Maria) are in Burgundy under the guardianship of their aunt the Dowager Duchess of Savoy. I do not think who either Margaret or Maximilian will agree to a such unfit match for Eleanor when she deserve at least a ruler in his own right. The French princess who was offered to the Scottish King or a princess of Navarre are much more logical and credible choices as bride for young Henry than the eldest granddaughter of the Holy Roman Emperor plus Maria of Aragon is still alive so Eleanor's proposed bridegroom can be only her cousin the Crown prince of Portugal
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017 at 4:55 PM
  7. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    It's a betrothal, don't get your knickers in a twist. If there is anything we should understand about betrothals in the 16th century, it's that (especially twixt royals) that they are often transitory. In fact, she has not yet arrived and it's summer!
     
  8. kasumigenx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    Henry, duke of York can marry a Borgia.
     
  9. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    Bit of a ret-con above: Manuel wanted Eleanor for his son originally, this is the dispensation the Pope disallowed........But Eleanor's aunt doesn't die until 1517; Pope Julius III is the pope who has given the dispensation for the marriage to the Tudors - he goes in 1513, followed by the one who did give it: Leo X. Right now, Eleanor is betrothed to Henry Tudor, Duke of York, but......
     
  10. kasumigenx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    Mary of Aragon can survive after 1517..
     
  11. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    Or Eleanor can marry before then.....she becomes "marriage legal" in November 1510.
     
  12. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    The emperor's oldest sister is wasted on a second son. Wed her to someone else. Like Christian II of Denmark
     
  13. desmirelle director of admissions, brookview sanitarium

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Location:
    Usually inside my head
    You and Scandinavia, Blue! :winkytongue:
     
  14. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Hey I am swedish and somewhat proud of it! Besides Eleanor is wasted on a second son
     
  15. olavops Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Tragedy could aways strike. Personnaly i'm still a supporter of a marriage with Princess Claude, for Henry, unlikely as it may be.

    Also, how old is Arthur's heir?
     
  16. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    I want to see a match with Margaret of Angloumene for Henry and either Isabella of Portugal or Isabella of Austria for Arthur jr
     
  17. olavops Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    I like Isabella of Portugal better, as it creates big ripples in the TL. Isabella of Austria was Eleanor younger sister, so if anything happened to Eleanor, she could serve as a replacement, marrying either Henry(Though it would take a few years more) or Arthur Jr.
     
  18. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Eleanor is 5 years older then Arthur jr. She is also to valuable to waste on Henry.
     
  19. olavops Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    I was talking about isabella, Eleanor's sister
     
  20. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Oh my bad I read it wrong