Any interest in classical music timelines?

There are many threads around this site outlining changes to popular culture and music. However, it has long been my intention to write a timeline chiefly concerning the development of classical music. As a result, I just want to enquire as to if there are any on this site who would be interested in either reading or working on such a project. My initial thoughts would be to centre around the early 1900 - hence the forum - and primarily the premiere (or not) of Igor Stravinsky's 'Rite of Spring.' Feel free to private message me if you so wish.
 
Yeah, some post-1900 "classical" music AH would be cool. Can't speak for anyone else, but I'd be interested in what you've got. :D
 
My classic music knowledge stop around the early 20th century so I will not be any help. I would be interesting in reading a Classical Music timeline. Give it a shot.
 
I would be interested in British composers of the period 1910s to 1950s. Names which come to mind are Benjamin Britten, Edward Elgar, Ivor Gurney, Gustav Holst, Michael Tippett, Ralph Vaughan Williams.
 
Many many years back, I responded to a classical music thread, and created a fictional timeline in which the young Franz Schubert survivied his illness (during which he had a norse-themed vision in my TL) and went on to become the greatest German composer of all time and the voice of an entirely different and (non-Wagnerian) series of programmatic symphonies, operas and cantatas extolling Germanic mythology and all things German.

I would also enjoy speculating on how the careers and styles of Russian composers like Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, as well as OTL exiles like Rachmaninov and Stravinsky might have differed had there been no Russian Revolution, or at least no Lenninism-Stalinism.

I am also interested in speculation regarding how German music and the careers of composers like Orff, Richard Strauss, as well as exiles like Hindemith would have differed in the absence of Hitlerism.
 
Many many years back, I responded to a classical music thread, and created a fictional timeline in which the young Franz Schubert survivied his illness (during which he had a norse-themed vision in my TL) and went on to become the greatest German composer of all time and the voice of an entirely different and (non-Wagnerian) series of programmatic symphonies, operas and cantatas extolling Germanic mythology and all things German.

I would also enjoy speculating on how the careers and styles of Russian composers like Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, as well as OTL exiles like Rachmaninov and Stravinsky might have differed had there been no Russian Revolution, or at least no Lenninism-Stalinism.

I am also interested in speculation regarding how German music and the careers of composers like Orff, Richard Strauss, as well as exiles like Hindemith would have differed in the absence of Hitlerism.
Thank you.
What an exquisite response!

As I have already stated, my prime directive at the moment revolves around the absence of the 'Rite of Spring' due to Najinsky leaving the Ballet Rus. Obviously, such backlash would affect the lives and output of other prominent composers. I'm also interested in writing, in another TL, about altering the life of Debussy. I'm a strict modernist at heart, and would also like to promote the sadly-obscure work of some fantastic Eastern European composers such as Aho, Artyomov and Myaskovsky.

A British TL would also be interesting - perhaps revolving around Percy Gainger due to his connections with the continent - but I can't stand RWV. ;)
 
Beethoven lives long enough to produce s tenth symphony. No ninth curse.
Then "Das Lied von der Erde" would have been Mahler's 9th Symphony, and he would have died after completing his 10th Symphony (9th in our TL).

I suppose Schubert and Dvorak would still die after their "9th symphonies", but at the time neither of these works were fully understood as "9th symphonies" by the broad public.

The result might be a perceived "10th curse" instead
 
It would be intersting, or making something like this kind of music more mainstream:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVuVIfL2UO8
This actually does sound pretty "mainstream" to me. It is tonally and harmonically conservative, rather like film music influenced by people like Part and Gorecki. I like it as a mood piece.

Can't tell if it's synthesized or played by an actual orchestra from an actual score. But it sounds like it may be synthesized. I suspect that all-electronic music will never be truly mainstream in "classical" music. Part of the unwritten arrogance of the "serious" music establishment is that should take a great deal of musical skill and formal education to compose it and perform it. Synthesized orchestral music virtually eliminates the performers and (depending on the programs used) opens complex "symphonic" composition to anyone with a keyboard and good synthesizing program. I'm sure there are "rank amateurs" out there with only the most minimal understanding of music theory composing powerful and beautiful music on their computers that 99% of us will never be able to appreciate as pure music.
 
I vaguely recall reading a published short story of an ATL where beethoven finished his 10th Syumphony and it galvanized German nationalism, resulting in an earlier German unification. Sorry, I can't recall title, author or much in the way of detail.
 
I vaguely recall reading a published short story of an ATL where beethoven finished his 10th Syumphony and it galvanized German nationalism, resulting in an earlier German unification. Sorry, I can't recall title, author or much in the way of detail.
That's a shame. That sounds like a most interesting TL, and potentially useful for the timeline. Any indications as to where I might find it?
 
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