Ann Aenglikonagur þeddr

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Ella.is.crazy, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. Homer Simpson & the Brain World Conquering Drunk *burp*

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    No problem. Also, I think I might have been a bit hasty in saying the Norse had no name for Great Britain as a whole. When you'll download the map, you'll notice the name "Bretland" hanging from Wales, but when I google-translated "Wales" into any of the Scandinavian languages there was no difference at all. It's probably pronounced differently in each tongue, but "Wales" being spelled the same in all of them is a strong clue the name's modern form might have started out as a Norse bastardization of the Old English "Wealas".

    In other words, Bretland might actually be the Norse name of Britain.
     
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  2. Ivoshafen Just A Man From Gondor - Recovering from SATS

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    Thank you :p
     
  3. The Professor Pontifex Collegii Vexillographiariorum

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    I suspect it's a bit of both. Originally Britain then narrowed down to the Britonic survivors before becoming Britain again as the AS/English Kings acquired the name to signify their dominion over the island (or at least the nonScottish bits).
     
  4. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    s l a v.png


    s q u a t
     
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  5. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    I forgot Avars weren't Slavs but oh well
     
  6. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    Iberia!
     
  7. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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  8. Ivoshafen Just A Man From Gondor - Recovering from SATS

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    Honestly, this thread is kinda inspiring me to try my hand at a altlang myself :p

    Good work! Loving the maps!
    Especially Slavenia
     
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  9. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    Ceite ast prabenne umma du Bargonde langunna.
     
  10. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    worlda.png
     
  11. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    Arpad Justinian az első, a Népföldek királya.
     
  12. Hominid The Real Hominid

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    I love this so far.

    Who are the Salqids? And what is the current year?
     
  13. The Professor Pontifex Collegii Vexillographiariorum

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    Btw this implies an Imperial King named Charles. ;)
     
  14. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    The current year is about 2019.

    The Salqids are a Bedouin dynasty that, with the help of the now extinct Fatamids, took over Sicily.
     
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  15. ruth 高い城の女

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    The modern form of 'Wales' in modern Scandinavian languages is a loan from English, not an English loan from ON. 'Welsh' is cognate to ON valskr, which means 'Celtic/Roman/foreigner in general', but it originated independently from its own Old English root, with much the similar meaning. (Fun fact, the same root is the source of Wales, Wallachia, Wallonia, and Gaul.)

    Imo the use of 'Bretland' easily expanded from its use in Wales to cover the entirety of the British Isles OTL, I see no compelling reason why it wouldn't happen again; this kind of metonymy is ubiquitous throughout history...

    but if you want to really go off the wall, you could adopt a new name for the island from the root that yielded Albion, which would yield something like Álfaland, that is, well, "Elves' Land."
     
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  16. Ella.is.crazy New England Nationalist

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    Ooooooooooo, good idea
     
  17. Homer Simpson & the Brain World Conquering Drunk *burp*

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    Never said "Wales" a loanword from Old Norse to English, I simply thought it came about through Danish settlers trying to pronounce "Wealas" ending up saying "Wales", or something similar, instead because they were hindered by how they were used to pronounce "valskr".
     
  18. Hominid The Real Hominid

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    While English vowel changes are hard to figure out, it appears that "ea" did become "a" in certain circumstances. See weax becoming wax, heard becoming hard. This is especially common after a "w." I suppose it's possible that this could reflect Norse influence, but there's no reason to think that, since the modern Scandinavian words for Wales are simply loanwords from modern English AFAIK. Maybe an actual linguist or expert on Old English could give better insight.
     
  19. Hominid The Real Hominid

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    How did they end up being Catholic?

    Also what's the technology level like ITTL?
     
  20. Homer Simpson & the Brain World Conquering Drunk *burp*

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    I admit that my theory pretty much comes from typing "valskr" into the Danish slot on Google Translate and listening to how it got pronounced, so not exactly a solid base, but I didn't find anything more substantial either.