Anastasia Film/Musical and Russian/Soviet Alternate History

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Joseph1, May 29, 2019.

  1. Joseph1 Member

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    Sep 12, 2017
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    This place is to discuss the 1997 film and 2016 musical Anastasia, specifically its quality as an alternate history for Russia. The 1997 animated film is quite inaccurate historically and even stretches the alternate history by making Grigori Rasputin directly responsible for the Bolshevik Revolution out of revenge. That is some ASB alternate history. The 2016 musical is more accurate with its main villain being a Red Army general known as Gleb, but it is still alternate history. I would like to know what the alternate history community as a whole thinks of Anastasia. Is it painfully inaccurate or watchable with a suspension of disbelief? I personally think the animated film is too inaccurate, but I am glad the Soviet Union got some attention in a fairy tale. I have not seen the musical yet, so I don't know how to judge its quality as an alternate history piece.
     
  2. Sicarius yeeeeehaw

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    Dec 5, 2010
    [​IMG]
     
  3. herkles Well-Known Member

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    May 8, 2017
    I want to know what a historical accurate Anastasia animated Musical would be like? :D
     
  4. Yorel Well-Known Member

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    May 27, 2010
    I'm shocked! I awlays believed Rasputin was an evil sorcerer who made a deal with the devil in order to get the power to destroy the Romanovs!
    If you're expecting an historically accurate adaptation of Anastasia's story, you've picked the wrong movie.
    If you're expecting basically a Don Bluth animated movie that has basically the same qualities as a Disney animated movie, then you're in for a very good time. Unless that's not your thing, but it certainly was mine.
    Dark and depressing most likely.
     
  5. Danthefan28 Well-Known Member

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    Nov 10, 2018
    Personally I really like the 1997 Anastasia musical.
     
    Yorel and terranova210486 like this.
  6. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 6, 2014
    Same.
     
  7. Joseph1 Member

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    Sep 12, 2017
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I do wish Lenin, Stalin, or even Trotsky had been mentioned in Anastasia. Comrade Stalin would have made an excellent villain with his mustache. It can still be alternate history with Anastasia surviving, but Stalin and the OGPU could be after her.
     
  8. teg The Worst Unionist

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    Sep 24, 2009
    Location:
    Aberystwyth
    I genuienly don't think you could do real life Anastasia in that format. Regardless of what else you can say about late tsarist Russia, and there is oh so very much that can and should be said about it, the story of Nicholas II's family is pretty purely tragic. I get the impression both Nicholas and Alexandra were poorly equipped to be parents, let alone rulers, and I strongly suspect that Alexandra at least had serious mental health issues after 1905.

    I generally like Anastasia, although I would probably also enjoy a take that subverts the idea of Rasputin the Mad Monk and the Bolsheviks as his puppets...
     
  9. Mr_ Bondoc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2004
    Well, here is the trailer for the musical, which actually looks pretty good:

     
  10. Yorel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2010
    I wouldn't say they were poorly equipped to be parents. Nicholas II's family left the image of a united family with very close bonds. Nicholas and Alexandra were probably a bit overprotective at times, but otherwise they looked to be good parents.

    What they weren't prepared for was having to deal with an haemophiliac Tsarevitch, especially in a time period where we didn't really know how to treat that. And to be fair, most parents wouldn't be and it's incredibly hard to take care of child suffering from a severe sickness. Just ask all the parents who have to raise a child who is unlucky enough to suffer from Cancer or any other illness of the like. Even if they love that child, it's not always easy to handle the situation. And it can take its toll, both physically and mentally.

    That proved particularly problematic with Nicholas II because he was an Absolute Monarch but really couldn't get his mind of the affairs of the state... Not that he had been well-prepared for his charge anyway, having received a very Reactionnary education and been a bit ill-prepared for the job. He really didn't need his son to be born with a sever sickness too.