"An Exchange of Lions for Swans" A 1300s Plantagenet-De Bohun TL

I am wondering what Elizabeth relationship with her husband will be like and I do believe she will be intelligent noblewoman because it wasn't until the late 16th and 17th century Nobel woman became less educated and perceived their lot in life has just broodmares. Elizabeth's mother Eleanor of castile manage heir own estates and was a moneylender creating revenue for herself and husband. She was also the woman that introduce wallpaper to England which back then was putting carpets on the wall. Also in the book Eleanor of castile the shadow Queen written by Sara Cockerill she suggested that Edward's conquests and campaigns where inspired by Eleanor and and her father Ferdinand III of castile. I am looking forward to seeing your Elizabeth in action wish you luck stay safe and have a good weekend.
 
Chapter 9: The Royal Brood
In the early months of 1308, the once-again pregnant Queen Elizabeth would take a pilgrimage along the Way of Saint James, and upon reaching Santiago de Compostela, would meet another royal Pilgrim; Martin I of Portugal. The Two would discuss many matters, and after some weeks of enjoying eachothers company, would part ways. Shortly after arriving in England, Elizabeth signed a treaty giving Portuguese Merchants fewer restrictions within the Cinque Ports of the Southern English Coast.

It would be in the April of 1308 that the third son of Elizabeth I of England and Humphrey de Bohun, King-Consort of England was born. Christened as Prince James Henry, owing to his mothers pilgrimage. the Boy was given the title of Duke of Clarence, and in the same moment would grant the title Duke of Westminster to her eldest son; Humphrey Edward, Prince of Wales, and the Title of Duke of Gloucester to their second son; Prince Alphonsus John.
Discussions would also begin between the crown of France in regards to a marriage between Eleanor; the sole daughter of the Queen and King-consort, and the third son of Phillipe IV; Charles of France, and it would be agreed that upon her turning sixteen, the pair would marry.


  • Elizabeth I, Queen of England and Lady of Ireland B. 1282, M. Humphrey de Bohun, King-Consort of England and Earl of Hereford B. 1276
    • Princess Eleanor of England B. 1304, Betrothed to Charles of France B.1296
    • Humphrey Edward, Prince of Wales B.1306, Betrothed to Isabella of Aragon B. 1305
    • Prince Alphonsus John, Duke of Gloucester B.1307
    • Prince James Henry, Duke of Clarence B.1308

 
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I am wondering what Elizabeth relationship with her husband will be like and I do believe she will be intelligent noblewoman because it wasn't until the late 16th and 17th century Nobel woman became less educated and perceived their lot in life has just broodmares. Elizabeth's mother Eleanor of castile manage heir own estates and was a moneylender creating revenue for herself and husband. She was also the woman that introduce wallpaper to England which back then was putting carpets on the wall. Also in the book Eleanor of castile the shadow Queen written by Sara Cockerill she suggested that Edward's conquests and campaigns where inspired by Eleanor and and her father Ferdinand III of castile. I am looking forward to seeing your Elizabeth in action wish you luck stay safe and have a good weekend.
Here's hoping she's like Eleanor of Aquitane!
 
Chapter 10: The Great Famine
It would be the harvest of 1308 where the first signs of the dismal sprimg and summer csme to fruition, or rather a lack of it. Across Europe, crops failed, and animals died. The price of all.food stocks rose exponentially, so much so that those families whos crops could not sustain them not even purchase more. Death strode across Europe with wonton disregard. Men, Women and children died in their droves, even two Kings are known to have died due to lack of foods; Charles Robert of Hungary and Haakon V of Norway.

In regards to England, the famine was as harsh as anywhere, with the borough of Liverpool declaring some sixteen thousand deaths to starvation alone. Her Majesty Elizabeth I sought to do her best, and so, to emcourage greater influx of foods, she removed all tariffs on trade of foodstuffs, and many merchants wishing to make a pure profit did follow through, and cash in on this opportunity. secondly, she also would make the grave decision to create new farmland upon the New Forest, with many thousands of acres of woodland being cleared, and crops being planted in the hope that the harvest of 1309 would be kinder.
 
Chapter 11: La Guerre du Sang, or the French War of Disaccord
With the betrothal of Charles of France to Princess Eleanor of England, almost all of the French Court were pleased with the Kings policy of maintaining peace amd friendship between the two kingdoms, aside from the Heir to the French Throne and the uncrowned King of Navarre; Louis of France and Navarre. He argued that the English refusal to arrest the Templars rendered them excommunicated, and thus his brothers association with them poisomed his own reputation and that of the Frencn Crown. He begged his father to abandon the betrothal amd when the King of France did refuse, Louis would leave the Île-de-France, never to return.

He would travel South, heading to his own Kingdom of Navarre where he issued a statement declaring that his fathers mind had been poisoned and led astray and that he harboured enemies of the Church and France herself. He declared that he was the King of France due to his fathers weakness, as Louis X of France and I of Navarre. The Count of Foix, and thus the Viscounty of Bearn would support Louis, as would numerous other nobles and Lords of the South.

As the ancient epithet goes, an army marches upon its stomach, and in the midst of the Great Famine, there was scarcity across all of Europe, and so while Louis gathered his men amd support, and so did Philipe IV of France, neither army yet marched.
 
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Not quite sure if Charles would be called 'prince', more likely that he's called the 'Duke of wherever'.

The usage of 'prince' to refer to a male child of a monarch was introduced considerably later in history, about the 17th or 18th century IIRC.

A notable exclusion is the prince of Wales, but that was because said Prince ruled over a principality, not because he was a son of the monarch.....
 
Chapter 12: The Guerre du Sang, Part two, or The Battle of the Brothers
As the Winter of 1308 gave way to the Spring of 1309, the early blooming fruits and vegetables gave hope for the harvest of the autumn, and Phillipe IV, eager to feed his growing armies, would offer the crown of England some fifty thousand Livres to supply the food. Thanks to Elizabeth's policies of the year prior, especially the clearing of the New Forest, It appeared the famine had passed from England. As English food poured into the many ports of the northern french shore, Phillipe's army stocked herself and marched south. Phillipe IV himself would lead this army, and had places his new heir; Phillipe le Long as commander of the Cavalry, and so botj father and son rode to war against their own flesh and blood. England was not alone in her relief of the famine, as much of Southern and Western France would experience the same good fortune, while the rest of europe struggled on.

Phillipe had also good tidings, for in 1308, his wife; Joan of Burgundy, had given birth to a son; Philippe of Burgundy as he is currently known at the French court. Phillipe of Burgundy was not the sole new addition to the House of Capet as Louis X and I also had a new child; Theophania of France and Navarre. The Armies of Philipe and Louis would meet at La Roche-sur-Yon, and almost immediately fell upon one another, and one of the earliest casualties of the battle would be the young Phillipe himself, being taken from his horse by a blunted lance. While not dead, the french heir would be carried from the battle by his retainers. For some six hours, the two armies would push to and fro, until the Bearnese Militia on the left flank of Louis's army gave way and the line collapsed, resulting in a retreat by Louis X and I, and his supporter. While not a stunning victory with the injury of his son, Phillipe IV was still pleased with the result and the bloodying of his eldest sons nose. As the Winter of 1309 encroached, the War for the crown of France did also march on.
 
Chapter 13: La Guerre du Sang, Part three, or A Swan in Battle
As the Winter of 1309 took place, little fighting took place, but it still did occur, particularly a Battle of Mende, in which a militia of some five thousand Mendois rose up in support of Phillipe IV, proving a massive blow to the support of Louis X and I. Phillipe IV himself had beem in further communications with Elizabeth of England, and so in December 1309, the English did sail. Fifty four vessels carrying six and a half thousand Englishmen did land in Gascony, led by the King-Consort of England himself; Humphrey de Bohun. The English Army did join the forces gathered by the Gascon lords, and so de Bohun stood at the helm of an army some ten thousand strong.

While the Army of Phillipe tore into the Northern lines of Louis's territory, the English Army did rip into their flank, with de Bobun leading every charge and assault, and at the Battle of the Ariège, Humphrey did personally face Louis X and I, and in a battlefield duel between the two, did give Louis a bloody and broken nose. After this battle, Support would fall away from Louis continually, and by the February, even the most ardent supporter; the Count of Foix, would leave his side amd beg forgiveness from Phillipe IV. It would be in April, 1310, where the climax of The War of Blood would happen, in Louis's own Kingdom of Navarre in a grueling four month long siege of Pamplona. After the walls had been breached, Louis did face his brother; Phillipe le Long, and in a duel, the younger son of the King would rise victorious, and phillipe le long would gain the nickname of "Tueur de Frères". The Peace between the regents of france was simple. Theophania of Navarre would be recognised as her fathers heir, but only in regards to Navarre, and Phillipe would be recognised as his fathers heir. Once the peace of Pamplona was dealt with, Phillipe IV would give Humphrey de Bohun his prize; The lands of Foix and Bearn
 
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First of all, Foix and Béarn have just been made available, as many other fiefs if this is a revolt against royal centralism - which is the only way Louis le Hutin could prove a threat to France.
Second, Philippe only needs the Salic Law exhumed to get the same settlement.
 
First of all, Foix and Béarn have just been made available, as many other fiefs if this is a revolt against royal centralism - which is the only way Louis le Hutin could prove a threat to France.
Second, Philippe only needs the Salic Law exhumed to get the same settlement.
there we go, Humphrey got given Foix and Besrn as vassals of the crown
 
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