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The Rise of Politics: First Four Years of Jefferson
Jefferson agreed with most Washington Era Politics. However, he was in opposition to most of the new states in the north, which banned slavery, which would make agriculture hard. Personally, Jefferson saw slavery as a necessary evil. First, he urged Congress and the Chair of Interior James Monroe to make slavery legal in all territories and Congress. Now with a Democratic-Republican majority, it passed easily. However, it was highly unpopular.

Then there was the Barbary Pirates. They had been taking control of American and French ships since the 1780’s, and had stopped excepting US tribute. The leader of Tripoli had been exceptionally harsh, so Captain William Bainbridge (later Chair of the Navy) on the USS Philadelphia which successfully took control of the city. They received short of a slap on the wrist, and the Barbary Powers backer off, officially joining the Ottoman Empire in 1817.

Although this improved his approval, more disputes where forming. First, both Britain and the US both claimed Bermuda. Secondly, Portugal claim a region known as Uruguay, under Spanish occupation. Finally, the status of Central America was questionable. No war broke out, but Jefferson seemed ready to hand over Bermuda to the British, in order to achieve a trade alliance. This led to a Hamilton election
 
The Rise of Politics: Other actions of the 4th Executive Council
New faces ran the Executive Council. An aging John Paul Jones was serving as Chair of Defense, and heavily disliked the name. James Monroe wanted a African colony, while John Adams, as persuaded by his son, wanted to restrict slavery, which meant an African colony was out. James Madison wanted to cut tariffs on Britain and Europe as to make southern trade easier. John Marshall wanted to expand the power of the Federal government, specifically the courts, and to repeal a clause that would remove a Supreme Court justice after seven years of service. Finally, Hamilton wanted to expand the government to an unseen amount, as to even disband the Executive Council and replace it with a ‘President.’ And with that, well, the Fourth Executive Council got to work.

John Paul Jones did not want re-election. He wanted to return to New York in peace. He would later say. “In the American War of Independence, I had not even begun to fight. In the Executive, I had begun to not want to fight.” He worked with Congress to dissolve the position, and replace it with Chair of the Army and Chair of the Navy. Hamilton refused to pass the law. He wanted fewer, not more council seats. There was a possibility for override, however. If Jefferson and three-fourths of the Executive Council wanted to override, then a vote of Congress, with a three-fourths majority could counter the decision.The day before the Executive Council voted, Hamilton signed. John Paul Jones simultaneously served in both, and retired in 1801.

James Madison, James Monroe, and John Adams where in a tug of war. Monroe needed Adams to agree to start a African colony, which meant more funding of the cut taxes would go to Africa. John Adams wanted that funding to go to New England, which meant trade, which meant more money. Finally, all signed on to the African Act of 1799, establishing a colony in Africa at the mouth of a river, as decided by Merriweather Lewis, a growing explorer.

John Marshall finally succeeded in February of 1800 in passing the 1st Amendment, making court seats permant unless a 7/10 vote of Congress removed the person for Treason or High Crime. His first appointee was John Jay, who appointed six others as he was ‘Chief Justice.’

Finally, Hamilton achieved many victories. He supported the First Amendment, and also led to the organization of the government of Texas, which was formerly Tejas, as a Commonwealth. He got Mexico admitted as a commonwealth, and pushed the break of Alta California, as a territory expanding from the Rio Grande to the Pacific., with Washington City as it’s capitol. He was pleased with his behind the scenes work, but desperately want a new money system, since the current ‘dollar’ wasn’t really working. He pushed through Theodore Sedgwick the Monetary Act of 1800, creating a national bank and the the American Pound, with the symbol $.
 
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Finally, Hamilton achieved many victories. He supported the First Amendment, and also led to the organization of the government of Texas, which was formerly Tejas, as a Commonwealth. He got Mexico admitted as a commonwealth, and pushed the break of Alta California, as a territory expanding from the Rio Grande to the Pacific., with Washington City as it’s capitol. He was pleased with his behind the scenes work, but desperately want a new money system, since the current ‘dollar’ wasn’t really working. He pushed through a new Senator, John C. Calhoun, the Monetary Act of 1800, creating a national bank and the the American Pound, with the symbol $.
Similar to Napoleon, unless Calhoun's birth was butterflied to an earlier date, Calhoun would be only 18 at the time when he became senator, which, unless the Constitution's age restrictions on senators are different ITTL, would make him ineligible for the position. I believe a better choice for this would be Theodore Sedgwick of Massachusetts, as he supported Hamilton IOTL, or Albert Gallatin if you want a more familiar name but a less likely person, as he was involved in America's early finance, but supported the Democratic-Republicans.
 
Similar to Napoleon, unless Calhoun's birth was butterflied to an earlier date, Calhoun would be only 18 at the time when he became senator, which, unless the Constitution's age restrictions on senators are different ITTL, would make him ineligible for the position. I believe a better choice for this would be Theodore Sedgwick of Massachusetts, as he supported Hamilton IOTL, or Albert Gallatin if you want a more familiar name but a less likely person, as he was involved in America's early finance, but supported the Democratic-Republicans.
This just makes me feel stupid. Once, okay. Twice, clearly I need help with the TL. Thank you for your concern and assistance in helping with this TL.
 
The Rise of Politics: A new election
Thomas Jefferson was loved in the South, loved in Quebec, and mildly disliked everywhere else, while Hamilton was loved everywhere north of Virginia, except Quebec. He won by a 60% vote in the election of 1805.

Office (Chair)OfficeholderVotesdefeatedvotes
ExecutiveAlexander Hamilton50Thomas Jefferson33
ConstitutionalThomas JeffersonN/AN/AN/A
StateJames Madison44John Adams39
TreasuryJohn Adams47James Madison36
JusticeJohn Marshall81Various others2
InteriorJames Monroe75Various others8
ArmyJohn Quincy Adams50DeWitt
Clinton
43
NavyWilliam Bainbridge 70Various others13
 
A Note to Readers
The butterfly effect is a beloved piece of Alternate History. This states that after the POD, things change; which change more things, and on and on. This means people will change. To any AH.com readers, I have seen some TL include new fictional people, so I want anyone reading to suggest those. Anyone born on or before December 31st, 1805 will exist in this timeline, with a different type of life. Some people born on or before January 1st, 1806 through December 31st, 1810 will exist. Finally, everyone born on or before January 1st, 1811 will not exist. Anyone with an account can suggest a person to be included, but I reserve the right to put some, not all people in this TL. Thank you.
 
The Rise of Politics: The Alien and Sedition Acts
On of Hamilton’s first acts was to give the power to deport ‘Aliens’ and to regulate unloyal Americans to the Chair of State. He hoped Adams would have his job back in four years, and the law would be unenforced by Madison. Then, Madison took a different approach.

Hamilton was born in the Indies. He had risen to prominence after the Revolution. Madison knew this, and when he rose to the enforcement, Madison took advantage of this. This led to Hamilton v Madison, in which it became a landmark case.

Of course, Hamilton kept his job, but it showed that Madison was rising. Hamilton challenges Madison to a duel, which had a huge media impact. Madison, quite the smaller, declined. From what continued in his term, things started to die down. West Cuba, Louisiana, and Tennessee became states. However, tensions where beginning to rise in Europe
 
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The Rise of Politics: U.S. Map c. 1806
1580437438318.png

Following an Act of Hamilton, the remainder of the of the Ohio Territory was split into the Ohio and Michigan Territories, lower and upper respectively.

States:
Delaware
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Virginia
Quebec
Georgia
South Carolina
North Carolina
Maryland
Connecticut
Pennsylvania
New Jersey
New York
Rhode Island
Vermont
Nova Scotia
East Florida
West Florida
West Cuba
Louisiana
Tennessee

Commonwealths:
Arkansas
Cuba
Kentucky
Labrador
Mississippi
New Brunswick
Newfoundland
Texas

Territories:
California
Canada
Canadian Islands
Iowa
Louisiana
Mexico
Michigan
Missouri
Mississippi
Northern Territories
Ontario
Ohio
Oregon
 
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The pre-Napoleonic War world
1580591696778.png

The World, c. 1806
Major Powers:
France
Spain
The Netherlands
The German Republic
Sweden
Minor Powers:
Greece
The United States
The Papal States
Major Powers:
Britain
Portugal
Russia
Ottoman Empire
Denmark
Minor Powers:
Naples
Sardinia
Sicily
Tuscany
 

Attachments

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The Napoleonic War: The Breakout
The world was a powder keg. Nations against nations. A variety of nations hated each other. On of these was the Germans and the Hungarians. Both claimed Hungary. Germany backed Greece, Hungary's top enemy, and the Hungarians where the middle block. Eventually, Hungary launched an attack on Vienna, later the Siege of Vienna, in October 1807. This caused Germany to declare war. This caused war to break out in Eastern Europe. Then German, French, American, Dutch, Spanish, Greek, Swedish and Papal leaders met in Paris. Alexander Hamilton and John Quincy Adams both wanted protection for America, but Napoleon Bonaparte, a favored soldier of Lafayette, wanted to unify Europe under him. He would personally attack and take control of the Italian peninsula. However, there was much more to the plan.

First, France would conquer the entire Italian peninsula to its own rule. Sweden would attack Norway. Germany would hold the Danish border until it conquered Hungary. Greece would hold its own. The Dutch would defend the European coast. Spain would take over Portugal. All nations give some force to fighting the British. A Irish rebellion in Ireland would help with this. However, the British had their own plans. Denmark and Russia would squish Sweden, then move on Germany. The British would knock out the Dutch, and Portugal would hold their own. In addition, the British would massacre the Americans. Finally, the plan in America was to hold their own.

France quickly marched throughout Italy until Milan, where the Italians held them up for a couple of days. The Germans retook Vienna and made it to the Bratislava, where the where held up for two months. Sweden and Denmark fought in the battle of Scandinavian Sea, as it was retroactively called as the area between the North and Baltic Sea. Russia pushed through Northern Sweden, and the rest of the world fell into stalemate. All except America...
 
The Napoleonic War: Campaign in America
Britain was boiling about the lost of its precious colonies. They conceived a clever plan. Attack Florida, Cuba, Texas, and Oregon. Then, move into the South, cause slave rebellions, and move up through Philadelphia, where they would hopefully surrender. However, the only battle they won was in Florida. In the battle of Arnold's Island, the British where cold from Russian Alaska, and where massacred. In Cuba and in Texas, they had under compensated the populations of the regions. Then in Florida, the Americans looked vulnerable in Florida. A popular phrase was "Remember the Sand Beach!," which later became a major city in Florida. When the rest was fired upon, the British where destroyed. However, the army in American constituted 5% of the entire army. The other 95% was fighting a massive war in Europe.

1580597391382.png
 
The Napoleonic War: 1808
America was only one part of the war. Europe was by far the largest. A couple if battles where fought in the Mediterranean, some off the African coast, but that was it. Chair John Quincy Adams attempted to get help from an unsympathetic Europe. However, to understand how things came up to this.

After returning to Europe, Lafayette had come to power in Europe. Slowly over 30 years, the powers of the king where reduced and given to the Le Premier président du Royaume républicain de France, a president elected for life. In the will of Louis XVI in 1805, he shocked the world, giving most of his power to Le Premier président du Royaume républicain de France, now commonly called Le Premier-president, rather than to his wife Marie, killing to royal line, mostly. Lafayette had planned a trip to the American Federal District to meet with Thomas Jefferson, leaving his Le président secondaire du royaume républicain de France, Napoleon Bonaparte. A election was called for the Second Premier-president, in which Napoleon won by a large margin.

Napoleon moved once the chance was given. He had taken northern Italy, annexed the Papal States, and where now in the Kingdom of Naples. Germany was holding its own, destroying Hungary and defending herself against Denmark. Spain won the Battle of Gibraltar and the Battle of Porto. Finally, Spain toppled its Iberian neighbor, Portugal. Greece and the Ottoman empire fought against each other to little effect. That Christmas, the Entente looked dull.
 
The Napoleonic War: The Entente strikes back
Italy and Portugal were lost. Britain was embarrassed by being held back by the Dutch. Russia was doing little. Then, the Alliance let there guard down.

Britain moved in to the now West coast of Spain, freeing Portugal after the Siege of Lisbon. Porto and A Corona where taken. Then, the Norwegian rebellion collapsed. Russia attacked Stockholm. Denmark attacked Goteborg. Russia and Hungary moved into Poland. Ottomans moved into Cyprus and started launching attacks on Greek islands.

Now, the turn of the war only came because of the British breaking through the Dutch blockade. After the American Revolution, the British maintained a massive military, but the Dutch built up a massive navy so they could protect Mediterranean, South American, and Asian colonies. However, it only took the British a couple of months to break the Dutch navy, even with German, French, and Spanish help. However, America had a surprise...
 
The Napoleonic War: A Victory
The only way for the Alliance to win was to subdue Britain. The only way to do that was to attack and/or cause a uprising in Ireland. And that is exactly what America did. John Quincy realized that America was not accepted as a world power. To counter this, winning a world war seemed like a good idea. The entirety of the American Navy, the seventh largest in the world (after Britain, the Netherlands, France, Russia, Spain, and Denmark) arrived at Cork on March 4th, 1810. Rebellion against Britain broke out in Dublin and Cork. Britain had to pull out of Portugal, allowing Germany to repel Hungary, Denmark, and Russia. Norway did not end up independent, but Italy and Portugal had fallen. Portugal became a state of Spain. Italy became a province of France.

Of course, Ireland was not freed... yet. This was the second Irish rebellion. Ireland looked up to America, another daughter of Britain, was freed. (Of course, not including the slaves, but that would be resolved soon) America was capitulated to the top of the international spectrum, of course behind Britain and France, but it was in the likes of the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, and Russia.
 
The Napoleonic War: A saddend America
During the war, George Mason and John Paul Jones die of natural causes. A funeral is set for inside the capitol building on April 10th, 1810. Hamilton hosted the funeral.

After the proceedings where over, a concerned Thomas Jefferson and John Adams called him over.

"What is it?" Hamilton said.
"Whose not here?" Jefferson said.
"Mason and Jones. I thought that was implied."
A dark stare at Jefferson quickly broke after he saw tears.
"Do you see Washington?" Adams said, avoiding Hamilton's gaze.
"No..."
"On his way here, his horse got spooked. He and Martha drowned in the Potomac." Jefferson said through tears.
"What?! He's what, 78?" Hamilton said.
"Alex, he's gone! The father of this nation is dead! America is orphaned!" Adams yelled, seeing Hamilton wasn't getting the memo.
Hamilton cried. Jefferson and Adams joined him. It seemed it would take a funeral to get the two tycoons of American politics to compromise.

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George Washington (1732-1810)
American military figure, statesman, and politician
Executive Chair, 1785-1797
 
The Rise of Politics Part 2: The Industrial Revolution
In the midst of the Napoleonic War, America was stranded from European goods. This led to massive manufacturing in New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Quebec, and the Great Lakes territory. This led to massive growth, creating the states of Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Huron, Ontario, and Superior, from former Ontario and Ohio territories.

Eli Whitney became famous for the cotton gin, leading to a massive growth in slave demand in the south, to the dismay of Quakers and Puritans in the North. Interchangeable parts soon also grew to the point that manufacturing. The growth of Industry would cause Samuel Morse to invent the telegraph and a variety of others inn twenty years.
 
The Rise of Politics Part 2: Global affairs, post-war
After Spain united the Iberian peninsula under the reign of Madrid, Portugal's colonies could be sold off to pay of debt. France bought its African colonies, but Spain didn't feel comfortable selling Brazil, being so close to its colonies. This led to the founding of the Federal Republic of Brazil, with a capitol at Rio de Janerio and an instant membership into the French alliance and trade partnership with the U.S.A.

Tensions in Central America where beginning to rise, while slavery issues where rising in the U.S., as well as religous conflict...
 
The Rise of Politics Part 2: In America
America in 1811 was made up of 3 regions (unofficially), and 26 states, 6 commonwealths, and six territories. 11 where slave states, with new commonwealths introduced that year as states. Mississippi and Kentucky made it even. However, Pennsylvania, New England, Quebec, New York, New Jersey, and the Great Lakes states had all banned slavery. If one state broke this delicate balance, the future of slavery would be decided.

For most of the history of the oligarchy up until now, slavery took a backseat to the Hamilton v. Jefferson struggle. However, major global events regarding the institution are in play.

A brief history of slavery after the American Revolution up to this point:
  • 1785- The Federal Republic of Germany adopts an anti-slavery, anti-serfdom constitution
  • 1787- Spain becomes the first Western major nation to abolish slavery
  • 1792-Portugal abolishes slavery in Europe, is maintained in Brazil
  • 1796-The Netherlands abolish slavery
  • 1800-All Scandinavian nations have abolished slavery
  • 1803-France abolishes slavery
  • 1808-Britain abolishes slavery
  • 1810- Pius VII denounces slavery as a morale evil, push to abolish slavery in Brazil
Major Catholic states in the U.S. started to fight against slavery. The Commonwealths of Texas and Mexico abolished slavery, as well as California territory. On August 1st, 1811, Maryland held an election to decide the future of slavery. The vote to abolish slavery was 57%, while pro-slavery was at 43%. To quickly solve what looked like could be Civil War, Congress allowed Arkansas to become a slave state. A new face on the Executive Council, Merriweather Lewis, signed the bill, as well as Hamilton and Jefferson. The nation had been saved, but it was only prelude to what was to come.
 
The Rise of Politics Part 2: A New American Order
Jefferson and Hamilton controlled politics through the early 19th Century. Adams and Madison where there henchmen. Jefferson was elected into the 1812-1816 Executive Council, and the 1816-1820, where his three terms expired. At that point, Jefferson retired from politics, while Hamilton led the Federalist party until around 1827, and remained an active member until his death in 1838. Each party got new faces, and the first third party system. First off, the Democrat-Republicans, now revived by Jefferson, and continued in 1824 by Madison, saw John C. Calhoun enter its ranks. However, in 1822, the party split along regional lines. The Democrats, a small government party in the South, was led by Madison and Calhoun. The Republicans where made of moderate and disaffected Democrats and Federalist who wanted to see the fall of political parties and to listen to the will of Washington led by new faces Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson. The Republicans where primarily in the West.

Meanwhile, King George III died in Windsor Castle on January 29th, 1820, and his son, King George IV was coronated soon, but he had served since 1811 as regent due to his father's illness.
 
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