The new showrunner
BBC News - 24th January 2016

It was announced last night that, after five series at the helm, Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat's next series will be his last as lead writer and executive producer. He has confirmed that his successor will be his close friend Toby Whithouse, creator of the BBC Three supernatural comedy-drama Being Human. Whithouse has written for Doctor Who numerous times over the past ten years, most recently for 2014's two-part episode Under the Lake and Before the Flood, and, like Moffat, is a lifelong fan of the show. Moffat congratulated him today on taking on the 'best job in the universe', while Whithouse paid tribute to his predecessor and praised him for growing the show's global popularity.

Moffat's Series 10 will air in spring 2017, while Whithouse's debut series as showrunner will premier in summer 2018. It's been reported that Peter Capaldi will definitely reprise his role as the Twelfth Doctor for Series 10, but that he is undecided about continuing for Series 11, with some suggestion that the new showrunner would appreciate a clean slate.

Toby_Whithouse.jpg

From "The Dreamer of Impossible Dreams: A Behind-the-Scenes History of the Revived Doctor Who" by Paul Cornell and Nicholas Briggs, 2026

In hindsight it is shocking to appreciate how close was the decision to make Toby Whithouse the third showrunner of the revived Doctor Who. In 2009, there had been only one realistic successor to Russell T. Davies. No one except Steven Moffat - the writer of The Empty Child, Blink, Silence in the Library and The Girl in the Fireplace, some of the most acclaimed episodes of Davies' tenure - was seriously considered for the role. In 2016, the situation was much less clear-cut. Moffat had already agreed to stay for series 10, even though he had originally intended to depart after the 2015 Christmas special 'The Husbands of River Song', because of the sheer lack of obvious alternatives. Jamie Mathieson and Peter Harness had both been mooted as potential contenders, but neither wanted the job.

Eventually, the choice came down to either Whithouse or Broadchurch producer Chris Chibnall, who had also written numerous episodes for Doctor Who and Torchwood; and, on the face of it, all the obvious advantages seemed to be with Chibnall's bid. The BBC was concerned by the slight but nonetheless noticeable decline in ratings during the 2014 and 2015 series of Doctor Who, and believed that the show needed a shake-up, with fresh blood and a willingness to radically reinvent the cast and production. Chibnall's vision seemed to fit more obviously into this agenda. He promised to cast the first female Doctor in the show's history, to appoint an entirely new team of writers with a focus on diversity and representation for women and black/minority ethnic writers, and to reduce the number of episodes per series from 12 to 10 in order to increase the budget per episode and promote a more cinematic production style. By contrast, Whithouse wanted to stick with the tried-and-tested formula of 12-episode series even if this meant a lower budget, and although he had no objection to a woman playing the title role, he had a male actor in mind for the role of the Thirteenth Doctor . He was also keen not to shake up the writing team radically and to continue to solicit contributions from Harness, Mathieson, Mark Gatiss, an other mainstays of the show's creative team. Chibnall was coming off the vast international success and critical acclaim of Broadchurch, while Whithouse's Cold War spy thriller The Game had been cancelled after a single series. A punt on Whithouse seemed both more of a risk, and to fail to provide the radical change the show needed.

But there were factors pointing in the other direction too. First, although Broadchurch (at least its first series) had been widely acclaimed, Chibnall's previous contributions to Doctor Who had been generally less well regarded, and he hadn't written for the show in any capacity since 2012. Second, Chibnall's commitment to diversity was much praised, but his intent to shake up the production team and employ entirely new writers meant that Mark Gatiss was firmly in the Whithouse camp; and besides, his ideas for the show simply did not seem quite as exciting. BBC controller Charlotte Moore later commented, 'We knew we'd take flak for the choice of Whithouse as a conservative pick. His casting choices were decidedly less flashy. But the more we heard about his ideas, the more we wondered if we had it back to front. The places he wanted to take Doctor Who just seemed...more inspiring.' Finally, Chibnall was always on the fence about whether he really wanted the job, and stated firmly that if he took it, he would stay for only three series. Whithouse by contrast was keen to match Moffat's total of six, and it was this latter factor - the promise of long-term continuity before the BBC had to go through this whole process again - that likely tipped the scales.

Given how transformative the Whithouse era was to Doctor Who, it is scarcely believable that his appointment rested on such a knife-edge. It is fun to speculate on what unique vision Chris Chibnall might have brought to the table. But it is hardly possible to imagine the legacy of the modern show without the man who cast three Doctors and became the longest running showrunner in Doctor Who's history.
 
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OOC: Hi everyone. I'm TrainedCormorant and I'm a Doctor Who fan who has long wanted to try an alternate history of the show as a fun creative writing exercise. We're taking as a point of departure that the initial press favourite for the job, Toby Whithouse, was appointed as showrunner in 2016 instead of Chris Chibnall, and we will write a history of his entire fictional 'era' as showrunner, including episode synopses and plot details, cast choices, contemporary reviews, and behind the scenes production notes. I might also invent a new spinoff for the show down the line, but haven't decided on that yet.

We're aiming for a fair bit of plausibility - I won't write about any episodes that address darker themes the show wouldn't likely address in reality, and all my casting choices hopefully will make sense - but also I'm going to be as creative as possible.

I will try to post a new update at least a couple of times a week, but will make a firm promise to update at least once a week.

And if you have any fun ideas for episodes that you might want to see, message me or post in the thread and your ideas might become part of history!
 
I would be greatly honoured if I could help you with this as I am a huge doctor who fan
That would be my pleasure. I already have the series-long arcs roughly planned out and every episode in my version of Series 11 drafted, but after that I will be delighted to have your help to fill in the details of this timeline. Really excited about it!
 
Any speculations about the identity of the Thirteenth Doctor?

They will be revealed tomorrow, along with the titles of the episodes in Series 11, and the casting choices for this series' two companions!
 
OOC: Hi everyone. I'm TrainedCormorant and I'm a Doctor Who fan who has long wanted to try an alternate history of the show as a fun creative writing exercise. We're taking as a point of departure that the initial press favourite for the job, Toby Whithouse, was appointed as showrunner in 2016 instead of Chris Chibnall, and we will write a history of his entire fictional 'era' as showrunner, including episode synopses and plot details, cast choices, contemporary reviews, and behind the scenes production notes. I might also invent a new spinoff for the show down the line, but haven't decided on that yet.

We're aiming for a fair bit of plausibility - I won't write about any episodes that address darker themes the show wouldn't likely address in reality, and all my casting choices hopefully will make sense - but also I'm going to be as creative as possible.

I will try to post a new update at least a couple of times a week, but will make a firm promise to update at least once a week.

And if you have any fun ideas for episodes that you might want to see, message me or post in the thread and your ideas might become part of history!

I'm quite interested to see what you will do with this.
 
I have an idea that we could possibly have Tom Hiddleston play the doctor
I'm happy to share with you in private my ideas for who the Doctors are going to be. I have already decided who the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Doctors are, but I think Tom Hiddleston would potentially fit for the Fifteenth. That's a way down the road, though.

I'm quite interested to see what you will do with this.
Thank you! When we get into the meat of each series I'll post every episode as a separate update, so I'm hoping that this timeline will be quite long-running.
 

kirbopher15

Kicked
I'm happy to share with you in private my ideas for who the Doctors are going to be. I have already decided who the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Doctors are, but I think Tom Hiddleston would potentially fit for the Fifteenth. That's a way down the road, though.
Go on ahead then
*Fades away due to regret
 
I'm happy to share with you in private my ideas for who the Doctors are going to be. I have already decided who the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Doctors are, but I think Tom Hiddleston would potentially fit for the Fifteenth. That's a way down the road, though.


Thank you! When we get into the meat of each series I'll post every episode as a separate update, so I'm hoping that this timeline will be quite long-running.

Cool. I've done several Nth Doctor timelines. Barbara Benedetti, David Burton, a version of the Nelvana Doctor Who animated series, and a Cushing cinematic history. Basically 90s interregnum stuff.

It's bold to go with a new era reimagining - a POD with Capaldi/Moffat and an alternative recent history. I'm interested to see how it shakes out, given developments like Brexit, the Trump era, Covid, the Culture Wars, and more.
 
It's bold to go with a new era reimagining - a POD with Capaldi/Moffat and an alternative recent history. I'm interested to see how it shakes out, given developments like Brexit, the Trump era, Covid, the Culture Wars, and more.
I considered doing a 'what if Doctor Who hadn't been cancelled' timeline but the issue is a) other people have done that before, probably with more knowledge of the fandom than I could and b) there's so much content floating out there in terms of novels, Big Finish adaptations etc. that I wouldn't have the creative freedom that this timeline gives me (there's no way that, if DW hadn't been cancelled, Human Nature or Lungbarrow wouldn't have been filmed in the 1990s, for instance).

I gather that this forum has a current politics ban so we will not address the above issues so explicitly, but there will definitely be a political subtext to some episodes.

First update coming very shortly.
 
Casting choices for Series 11
The Guardian - 2nd April 2017

Frontrunner to become the next Doctor Who, David Harewood, has sensationally ruled himself out of the race, in a move that is speculated to have upset the plans of showrunner Toby Whithouse. Bookies had suspended betting following speculation that Whithouse had met with Harewood formally to offer him the role, but any such offer appears to have fallen through.

Toby Whithouse, in an interview included in the bonus features for the box set release of Doctor Who, Series 14 - "Back at the start of my tenure as showrunner, I'd intended right away to cast the first ethnic minority actor to play the Doctor, but I didn't want the casting to be a gimmick. I planned to cast David Harewood simply because I thought he was the right man to play the Thirteenth Doctor as I saw him - a man of warmth, compassion, immense intelligence, and quiet, thoughtful gravitas. Unfortunately David was booked for so many TV and film projects in 2018/2019 that it simply became impossible for him to commit to our filming schedule. And I had another actor in mind who I managed, with some gentle coaxing, to poach from another series over in the States, and who fit my idea of the Thirteenth Doctor slightly differently but just as well. I don't regret that choice. But it did make me all the more determined that when we got round to Series 14, we'd get it right.

The Telegraph - 16th July 2017

The next star of Doctor Who has finally been revealed after intense speculation for many months. As of 2018, Matthew Macfadyen, star of Spooks and Ripper Street, will be taking over from Peter Capaldi as the Thirteenth Doctor. 'He was one of the first people on my initial shortlist', remarked showrunner Toby Whithouse, 'and as soon as I saw his audition, I knew that my hardest job would be in persuading him to take the role, not in deciding whether to cast him.'

Macfadyen's casting has generally been praised by those involved with the show, including outgoing showrunner Steven Moffat (whose final episode, this year's Christmas special Twice Upon a Time, will see Capaldi regenerate into Macfadyen), Twelfth Doctor Peter Capaldi, and previous Doctors David Tennant, Matt Smith, and Tom Baker. A few critics have, however, expressed mild disappointment with the choice, seeing Macfadyen as an unambitious pick and suggesting that this was the time to pick a woman or an ethnic minority actor to front the series.

matthew-macfadyen-2-2022-noms-450x600.jpg

BBC News - 4th October 2017

Incoming Doctor Who showrunner Toby Whithouse - who will make a cameo appearance of his own in this year's Doctor Who Christmas special, Twice Upon a Time - has revealed two characters who will be joining Thirteenth Doctor Matthew Macfadyen in the TARDIS next June. Both have worked with Whithouse on previous projects.

Tom Hughes - who starred as protagonist of Whithouse's 2015 Cold War thriller series The Game - will be cast as Tom Hawkins, who will be introduced as the Thirteenth Doctor's first companion. Whithouse hinted in an interview today that Hughes's character would come from a time period other than contemporary Earth, and cryptically remarked that much of series 11 would be focussed on his 'quest to find out who he really is.'

ab4e71c90de3dcaf7459421c92f03c3f.jpg

Lenora Crichlow - who starred as the ghost Annie Sawyer in Whithouse's comedy-drama Being Human - has been cast as an as-yet unnamed character. It is not yet clear whether Crichlow's character will be a recurring character or a full-time companion, nor is it obvious why Whithouse has chosen to keep the name of her character secret for now. Fans are already speculating whether Crichlow represents a recurring character from the show's history. Whithouse has confirmed on Twitter, however, that she does not represent an earlier incarnation of the Doctor's Moffat-era love interest River Song, whose story he believes has come to a natural conclusion - thus quashing one immediate speculation from fans.

Lenoracrichlow.png

 
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Series 11 Episode titles
BBC News - 25th January 2018

Showrunner Toby Whithouse has confirmed that the much anticipated Series 11 of Doctor Who, which will air on BBC One this June, will not feature any appearance from the show’s three most iconic returning villains the Daleks, the Cybermen, or the Master.

‘I think sometimes these things can get a bit overused and in need of a rest’, commented Whithouse last night. ‘We’ve had some wonderful Cyberman and Master/Missy stories in Peter Capaldi’s era and it’s time for us to focus on something new. I can promise that there will be a recurring monster in Series 11 though - just not one of the most obvious three!’

Doctor Who Magazine - 18th April 2018

The wait is nearly over - just two more months until Series 11 of Doctor Who under its new management - and we are able to reveal as a Doctor Who Magazine exclusive the titles of all but one of the episodes in the upcoming series! Team TARDIS will have the usual twelve adventures, and they will be titled as follows:

1. Doctors and Demons
2. Tabula Rasa
3. Terror on the Red Planet
4. The Pharaoh's Curse
5. The Labyrinth
6. [Not revealed]
7. Day of the Dead
8. Rosa
9. The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Astro
10. The Big Bad Wolf
11. Lightning
12. Thunder

We don't know about you, but we are tremendously excited about this list, and we love how it provokes far more questions than it answers. 'Lightning' and 'Thunder' are presumably the two halves of a series finale, but what are they referring to? Episode 8 seems likely to be the historical episode about Rosa Parks written by Malorie Blackman that we were promised last month, but apart from that, we have relatively few clues. What's the relevance of the Big Bad Wolf - an obvious callback to the first series of the revived show? Does the title of episode 9 promise a high-stakes sci-fi casino thriller? And why on Earth has the Doctor Who team chosen to keep the title of episode 6 a secret? We can't wait to find out!
 
Synopsis of first episode, together with ratings, reviews and production notes, will be posted tomorrow!

Comments on my casting choices and speculations on what the episode titles could mean are much appreciated.
 
Lenora Crichlow - who starred as the ghost Annie Sawyer in Whithouse's comedy-drama Being Human - has been cast as an as-yet unnamed character. It is not yet clear whether Crichlow's character will be a recurring character or a full-time companion, nor is it obvious why Whithouse has chosen to keep the name of her character secret for now. Fans are already speculating whether Crichlow represents a recurring character from the show's history. Whithouse has confirmed on Twitter, however, that she does not represent an earlier incarnation of the Doctor's Moffat-era love interest River Song, whose story he believes is finished - thus quashing one immediate speculation from fans.

View attachment 871443
Any guesses for who Lenora Crichlow will be playing?
Lenora is playing Lily from the pilot ep of Death in Paradise, who, turns out, is an incarnation of the Rani. DW and DiP in the same universe, confirmed. ;)

BBC News - 24th January 2016

It was announced last night that, after five series at the helm, Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat's next series will be his last as lead writer and executive producer. He has confirmed that his successor will be his close friend Toby Whithouse, creator of the BBC Three supernatural comedy-drama Being Human. Whithouse has written for Doctor Who numerous times over the past ten years, most recently for 2014's two-part episode Under the Lake and Before the Flood, and, like Moffat, is a lifelong fan of the show. Moffat congratulated him today on taking on the 'best job in the universe', while Whithouse paid tribute to his predecessor and praised him for growing the show's global popularity.

Moffat's Series 10 will air in spring 2017, while Whithouse's debut series as showrunner will premier in summer 2018. It's been reported that Peter Capaldi will definitely reprise his role as the Twelfth Doctor for Series 10, but that he is undecided about continuing for Series 11, with some suggestion that the new showrunner would appreciate a clean slate.


From "The Dreamer of Impossible Dreams: A Behind-the-Scenes History of the Revived Doctor Who" by Paul Cornell and Nicholas Briggs, 2026

In hindsight it is shocking to appreciate how close was the decision to make Toby Whithouse the third showrunner of the revived Doctor Who. In 2009, there had been only one realistic successor to Russell T. Davies. No one except Steven Moffat - the writer of The Empty Child, Blink, Silence in the Library and The Girl in the Fireplace, some of the most acclaimed episodes of Davies' tenure - was seriously considered for the role. In 2016, the situation was much less clear-cut. Moffat had already agreed to stay for series 10, even though he had originally intended to depart after the 2015 Christmas special 'The Husbands of River Song', because of the sheer lack of obvious alternatives. Jamie Mathieson and Peter Harness had both been mooted as potential contenders, but neither wanted the job.

Eventually, the choice came down to either Whithouse or Broadchurch producer Chris Chibnall, who had also written numerous episodes for Doctor Who and Torchwood; and, on the face of it, all the obvious advantages seemed to be with Chibnall's bid. The BBC was concerned by the slight but nonetheless noticeable decline in ratings during the 2014 and 2015 series of Doctor Who, and believed that the show needed a shake-up, with fresh blood and a willingness to radically reinvent the cast and production. Chibnall's vision seemed to fit more obviously into this agenda. He promised to cast the first female Doctor in the show's history, to appoint an entirely new team of writers with a focus on diversity and representation for women and black/minority ethnic writers, and to reduce the number of episodes per series from 12 to 10 in order to increase the budget per episode and promote a more cinematic production style. By contrast, Whithouse wanted to stick with the tried-and-tested formula of 12-episode series even if this meant a lower budget, and although he had no objection to a woman playing the title role, he had a male actor in mind for the role of the Thirteenth Doctor . He was also keen not to shake up the writing team radically and to continue to solicit contributions from Harness, Mathieson, Mark Gatiss, an other mainstays of the show's creative team. Chibnall was coming off the vast international success and critical acclaim of Broadchurch, while Whithouse's Cold War spy thriller The Game had been cancelled after a single series. A punt on Whithouse seemed both more of a risk, and to fail to provide the radical change the show needed.

But there were factors pointing in the other direction too. First, although Broadchurch (at least its first series) had been widely acclaimed, Chibnall's previous contributions to Doctor Who had been generally less well regarded, and he hadn't written for the show in any capacity since 2012. Second, Chibnall's commitment to diversity was much praised, but his intent to shake up the production team and employ entirely new writers meant that Mark Gatiss was firmly in the Whithouse camp; and besides, his ideas for the show simply did not seem quite as exciting. BBC controller Charlotte Moore later commented, 'We knew we'd take flak for the choice of Whithouse as a conservative choice. His casting choices were decidedly less flashy. But the more we heard about his ideas, the more we wondered if we had it back to front. The places he wanted to take Doctor Who just seemed...more inspiring.' Finally, Chibnall was always on the fence about whether he really wanted the job, and stated firmly that if he took it, he would stay for only three series. Whithouse by contrast was keen to match Moffat's total of six, and it was this latter factor - the promise of long-term continuity before the BBC had to go through this whole process again - that likely tipped the scales.

Given how transformative the Whithouse era was to Doctor Who, it is scarcely believable that his appointment rested on such a knife-edge. It is fun to speculate on what unique vision Chris Chibnall might have brought to the table. But it is hardly possible to imagine the legacy of the modern show without the man who cast three Doctors and became the longest running showrunner in Doctor Who's history.
I'm now tempted to do that more humorous timeline of mine, with Mathieson as a potential showrunner and an alternate female 13th Doctor. :p
 
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Series 11 Episode 1 - Doctors and Demons
From "The Dreamer of Impossible Dreams: A Behind-the-Scenes History of the Revived Doctor Who" by Paul Cornell and Nicholas Briggs, 2026

Series 11 Episode 1 - Doctors and Demons by Toby Whithouse
The much-anticipated first episode of series 11 saw the newly-regenerated Thirteenth Doctor (Matthew Macfadyen) recuperating from his post-regeneration trauma in Victorian London and rapidly becoming drawn into the Paternoster Gang's investigations into a series of mysterious attacks on London pedestrians. Madame Vastra (Neve McIntosh) is convinced that these are the work of the urban legend Springheeled Jack. The group's investigations conclude that Springheeled Jack is really a renegade Arak, an extremely agile and hard to catch alien species that feeds on causing fear and distress.

Becoming separated from the group, the Doctor joins forces to investigate with a young Arthur Conan Doyle (Samuel West), still a doctor at the time; he has not yet written the Sherlock Holmes stories, and the episode implies that the Doctor may be his inspiration for them. He also meets a medical student called Tom Hawkins (Tom Hughes), a friend and colleague of Doyle who is afraid that he’s going mad and even begins to believe he could unknowingly be guilty of Jack’s crimes. The amnesiac Tom, who has a mysterious blue tattoo of a lightning bolt on his wrist, cannot remember anything before his 25th birthday, and has spells of sleepwalking where he wakes up in unusual parts of the city of London. At the end of the episode, as Jack evades the Doctor and Madame Vastra's attempt to trap him, Tom is apprehended by police after going missing, since his fiancée has become frightened by his disappearances and has come to suspect him of being Jack.

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The Thirteenth Doctor in his main costume for Series 11

Toby Whithouse, interview in Series 11 DVD bonus features - 'For the first episode, our aim was to strike that delicate balance - between reminding regular viewers that this was the same show, and giving new fans the perfect jumping-on point. Bringing back the Paternoster Gang to help the Doctor in his first investigation seemed like a perfect nod to the Moffat era - one that didn't need too much context to appreciate, since the main takeaway for new viewers would be that in this show you should expect the unexpected, including lizard people and angry potato-headed men randomly showing up to help! Apart from that, I wanted to give the Doctor a real runaround for his first taste of the action. No dwelling on post-regeneration trauma - instead, all these bits happen offscreen, and in the episode we're straight into the action.'

The Guardian, 3rd June 2018

So at long last we get our glimpse of the Thirteenth Doctor - and he's very different but also very familiar. Macfadyen plays the role with a real sense of gravitas - he's confident, forthright, compassionate, you couldn't imagine him becoming casually irritable in quite the same way as Capaldi, but he also seems...more distant and alien than the loveable curmudgeon Twelve had become. One gets a real impression of the Doctor as a formidable figure. He's truly the Oncoming Storm, as he was dubbed during the Moffat years.

Radio Times

It was interesting how quickly the mystery of Springheeled Jack's identity was resolved. Ten minutes in, the Paternoster Gang were quite sure of his identity and species, and the meat of the episode came in the comedic touches of the Doctor meeting Conan Doyle; the gang plotting on how best to apprehend Jack and realising the task was harder than they'd hoped; and the identity of Tom Hawkins. This final mystery seems likely not to be resolved anything like so quickly. Indeed, I'd say it seems likely to be the driving force for much of the story arc this season.

Digital Spy

A top-notch opening for the new era of Who - not the most politically meaningful or experimental of episodes, acting instead as a romp around Victorian London, but beautifully and atmospherically filmed with plenty of swirling mist and orange gaslight, and does a really effective job at introducing the new Doctor and his companion. And there is a hint at perhaps the wider theme of the series, which is a quest for identity. The Thirteenth Doctor - who seems more distant and aloof than previous Doctors, and almost tries to hold the audience at bay from accessing his inner world - is a man uncertain how to define himself, riffing off David Tennant's speech in The Christmas Invasion where he muses as to what sort of man his Doctor is going to be. Tom Hawkins, meanwhile, is uncertain who he really even is, and the foundations of his middle-class life are toppling as hints of old sins come back to haunt him. His is surely the most inauspicious beginning of any companion in the modern show - at the end of episode 1, he's in a jail cell, and has only met the Doctor for a single brief conversation. We're eager to see how this unusual partnership plays out over the next eleven weeks.

Date aired: 2nd June 2018
UK ratings : 7.78 million (5.76 million overnight)
 
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Apologies for failing to post this yesterday as I had promised. I've been a little ill - but I can promise that I've also finished the posts for Episodes 2 and 3, so you'll get full updates tomorrow and the day after.

I hope you enjoyed reading about the Thirteenth Doctor's first adventure (or, at least, the first part of this 2-part story). Would you like to watch it as much as the real Series 11, Episode 1 (The Woman Who Fell to Earth) ? If you have any suggestions please let me know!

Lenora is playing Lily from the pilot ep of Death in Paradise, who, turns out, is an incarnation of the Rani. DW and DiP in the same universe, confirmed. ;)


I'm now tempted to do that more humorous timeline of mine, with Mathieson as a potential showrunner and an alternate female 13th Doctor. :p

I love Death in Paradise and am tempted to include some more cast from it at some point x'D .

As for whether Lenora is playing an incarnation of the Rani, I could not possibly comment either way.

I'd love to read your alternative timeline too! Mathieson as showrunner has great potential. I loved all four of his episodes for the show.
 
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I hope you enjoyed reading about the Thirteenth Doctor's first adventure (or, at least, the first part of this 2-part story).
Personally, I did indeed.

Would you like to watch it as much as the real Series 11, Episode 1 (The Woman Who Fell to Earth) ? If you have any suggestions please let me know!
Definitely. You've also established the initial mystery pretty well. :cool:

I love Death in Paradise and am tempted to include some more cast from it at some point x'D .
I had just watched the premiere run of our dub over here, it started airing on the 6th of November. They're already at the beginning of series 4.

Joking about Lenora's guest role aside, I've been familiar with the series for a fair few years.

As for whether Lenora is playing an incarnation of the Rani, I could not possibly comment either way.
Fine by me. :) And get well soon.

I'd love to read your alternative timeline too! Mathieson as showrunner has great potential. I loved all four of his episodes for the show.
You've asked, I've started a look at a Mathieson showrunning era. Hope you find it interesting.

I'm starting with broad ideas, but I'll narrow them down over time, as I get to focus on the ideas behind the episodes.
 
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Series 11 Episode 2 - Tabula Rasa
From "The Dreamer of Impossible Dreams: A Behind-the-Scenes History of the Revived Doctor Who" by Paul Cornell and Nicholas Briggs, 2026

Series 11 Episode 2 - Tabula Rasa by Toby Whithouse

Within thirty seconds of the opening to the second part of Series 11's Victorian adventure, the stakes have been raised considerably. There's a cold open in which, as the Doctor and the Paternoster Gang debate their next moves, the door of their London townhouse is smashed down by a brigade of Judoon, who are also searching for the renegade Springheeled Jack and are typically unconcerned with who gets hurt along the way. The Doctor is presented with an ultimatum that unless Jack is caught within 24 hours, the Judoon will invade the city and capture him by force, regardless of the collateral damage.

The Doctor, Strax (Dan Starkey) and Madame Vastra race to apprehend Jack before the Judoon's deadline is up, while meanwhile Conan Doyle and Jenny (Catrin Stewart) attempt to prove to the police that Tom could not be the culprit. The Doctor gets a chance to meet Tom again, who unwittingly gives him clues on Jack's modus operandi and how to capture him; but the Doctor becomes disquieted by how Tom seems to know things about space travel that ought not to be possible for a man of the nineteenth century. He theorises that Tom is from the future and is marooned in the past, with his memories crudely and imperfectly wiped. After the Doctor succeeds in capturing Jack in the nick of time, Tom is released from prison; his engagement over, he chooses to travel with the Doctor, who promises to help him find out who he really is.

In a post-credits scene, in a futuristic but dystopian city a woman with a lightning bolt tattooed on her wrist - red, but otherwise identical to Tom's tattoo - tells her subordinate that they have lost track of Tom’s whereabouts. She asks him to proceed with the plan ahead of schedule.

FJtt--OXIAkl5hw.jpg:large

Tom Hawkins (Tom Hughes) considering whether to stay in Victorian London or to go with the Doctor

Toby Whithouse, interview in Series 11 DVD bonus features - 'The Judoon were always one of my favourites of Russell's additions to Who's roster of monsters. The idea of a intergalactic mercenary police force is an interesting one to explore because it shows the dangers of going too far and ignoring the rule of law when attempting to enforce order. And 'Judoon' is just such a wonderful name, it conjures up the image of cumbersome thugs stomping around! So, including them in this adventure was a perfect way to ramp up the stakes and to pay tribute to the man who brought back Doctor Who, after I'd already made a hat-tip to the Moffat years.'

Radio Times, 11th June 2018

So, Tom is in the TARDIS at last, despite having spent most of these two opening episodes either wandering around thinking he was going mad, or inside a jail cell. He's certainly an interesting character, and Tom Hughes brings a certain diffident and vulnerable charm to the role, but it will only really be possible to judge him as a companion when we see him properly in action next week. And what about that post-credits scene! It's pretty obvious that the mystery of who Tom really is will be the driving force of this series. While I appreciate continuity, I hope he doesn't turn out to be the Master in disguise or something of that ilk. It'd be far better to have something genuinely new, after a period where it felt as if the show was becoming a little too obsessed with itself and impenetrable to newcomers.

The Telegraph, special feature, 14th June 2018 - 'Conan Doyle: A Man Ahead of His Time?'

...one of the most interesting aspects of last week's episode of Doctor Who was how it portrayed Arthur Conan Doyle, even in his youth, as more than just an author - as a humane man who was sincerely interested in justice. Towards the end of the episode the Doctor mentioned to his new companion that Conan Doyle would ensure numerous wrongfully convicted people were exonerated, and referred to George Edalji, a British-Indian lawyer wrongfully convicted of harming animals and freed after Conan Doyle advocated for him. It's wonderful to see Doctor Who taking itself seriously as a show that educates as well as entertains - this is all completely true, and indicates that Conan Doyle had a more forward-thinking attitude towards race than many of his contemporaries...

Date aired: 9th June 2018
UK ratings : 7.39 million (5.27 million overnight)
 
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