An alternate history of animated films

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by NoName, Jun 12, 2019.

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What Dr. Seuss story should Warner Brothers make a film of first?

Poll closed Jun 23, 2019.
  1. Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose

    12.5%
  2. Bartholomew and the Oobleck

    50.0%
  3. Gerald McBoing Boing

    12.5%
  4. Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories

    25.0%
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  1. NoName Well-Known Member

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    I think it'll probably look more Disney-like.
     
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  2. NoName Well-Known Member

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    I think next update will cover both 1962 AND 1963. The latter year will give us Chuck Jones's The Jungle Book, which will adapt Mowgli's Brothers, Kaa's Hunting, and Tiger! Tiger!.

    Here is the voice cast I'm picturing:

    Mowgli: Kurt Russell or Paul O'Keefe
    Baloo: J. Pat O'Malley or Sebastian Cabot (I'm aware of the irony)
    Bagheera: Don Rickles or Jonathan Winters
    Shere Khan: Vincent Price
    Tabaqui: Paul Frees
    Father Wolf: Marvin Miller
    Mother Wolf: June Foray
    Akela: Hans Conried
    Kaa: Orson Welles
    Chil: Dallas McKennon
    Bander-Log: Mel Blanc, June Foray, Daws Butler, and Paul Frees
    Messua: June Foray
    Messua's husband: Jim Backus
    Buldeo: Junius Matthews
    Grey Brother: Mickey Rooney
     
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  3. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

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    Could you fill the rest of us, in on the joke?
     
  4. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Sebastian Cabot voiced Bagheera IOTL's version.
     
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  5. Mort the Reaper Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing this means Baloo's characterization will be closer to how he was in the original Kipling stories?
     
  6. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Yup. The film as a whole will be more faithful than Disney's OTL version.
     
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  7. Threadmarks: 1962-1963

    NoName Well-Known Member

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    1962
    MGM releases The Fellowship of the Ring. The film has less influence from Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera due to them being busy working on their television shows, but is still a big hit and gets good reviews. MGM officially announces plans to film the entire Lord of the Rings franchise.

    1963
    Warner Brothers releases Chuck Jones' The Jungle Book. This film is a big enough success that WB decides to announce an adaptation of the sequel, The Second Jungle Book, for 1966.

    Disney announces an animated film adaptation of P.L. Travers' Mary Poppins for 1964, and for the same year, Fleischer announces an animated adaptation of Theodore Pratt's 1942 novel Mr. Limpet, titled The Incredible Mr. Limpet for 1964.

    ----

    Sorry about the short update. I couldn't think of a lot to say for these two years.
     
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  8. Major Major Tired Old Man

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    Does this speed plans to bring out the books in paperback? Will cash-strapped Ace Books light on another public-domain work and put out a quick edition? What does Tolkien himself think of all this?

    In other news, I don't think Batman has a very good presence in this. Comics Code means no Catwoman (because when she wasn't making passes at him, he let her get away after recovering what she'd stolen) and a comic Joker (instead of a "I only kill people when it's funny" type).
     
  9. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Probably varying somewhere from "mixed" to "not a fan", like most authors when their work is adapted.
     
  10. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    Not an expert, but from what I've read, Carter is about as uncomical a character as you can get.

    Animation does lend itself to the Tharks, thoats, & such, tho. It also makes depicting Burroughs' four-handed Thark fighting style practical, which could be interesting.

    And for the record, it's Warner Bros.; the abbreviation is the correct form.

    Do I understand "Uncle Remus" meant to replace "Song of the South"? It looks like it's still going to generate backlash (=OTL) from using minstrel-based songs & Negro stereotypes.

    In ref the Superman film, does he get the powers from the serials, including flight, heat vision, & so forth, or stick to the original comics-level ones?

    In ref Batman, presuming this is aimed mainly at kids, does he take the Golden Age approach to villains (throwing them off buildings:eek: )? (I have to think the film censors won't allow that...) And does he have Robin aboard yet? (That would seem to be better for attracting a kid audience.)

    I'm opposed to origin stories, frankly, as unnecessary: you've got established audiences for both characters, numbering in the millions of kids (for Supes) & hundreds of thousands (for Bats).

    One character that would be kid- & animation-friendly would be Captain Marvel--if you can get past the DC-Fawcett lawsuit issues...
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019 at 8:40 PM
  11. DakotaTimeTraveler Well-Known Member

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    Getting into the 1960s, anime started being exported to other countries, especially the USA. Around this time in OTL, we'd get Speed Racer, Gigantor, Astro Boy and Kimba the White Lion.

    Is that happening too ITTL? Is this animated film boom in the USA affecting Japan in any way?

    What's more is that the 1960s anime wave set the ground work for the 1980s anime invasion that started in 1979 with Star Blazers and continued with tons of syndicated & cable shows like Voltron, Robotech, Saber Rider, Maple Town, the Mysterious Cities of Gold, Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics and more. I don't know if this TL will go into the 1980s and 1990s but will this 1980s wave of anime on American television happen?
     
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  12. Loulou Well-Known Member

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    How about have Lupin III be one of the first successful anime to be aired in America?
     
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  13. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    What is up with the insistence on zany & wacky?

    Especially with Don Quixote, of all things?
     
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  14. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

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    While Don Quixote has some wacky elements, It is about a man who loses his grip on reality and end up having to face reality again.
    He spend a lot of time in jail. It not a happy go lucky story.
     
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  15. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Okay, for those wondering what's up with the zany and wacky films...that's what Warner Brothers does best with their shorts, so I feel like that would apply to their films too. (I'm not going to use the abbreviation, BTW.)

    Disney made plenty of zany adaptations IOTL. King Arthur, The Jungle Book, and Robin Hood aren't exactly zany stories, and yet look at The Sword in the Stone and the respective Disney adaptations of TJB and RH. Hell, one of Disney's films from OTL started out as a serious drama before evolving into a zany comedy mid-production. (Kingdom of the Sun > The Emperor's New Groove)

    As for the question about anime, (spoiler alert) Osamu Tezuka is going to team up with Walt on a project later in the sixties.
     
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  16. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    I have to wonder why Hanna-Barbera is suddenly not the low-rent animation studio of OTL. I don't say Yogi or the Flintstones were bad characters, but the animation was not what I'd call top-drawer.
    Except, these aren't shorts, are they? They're features. And they're not created whole cloth, like Looney Tunes or Merrie Melodies (or whatever), they're based on serious works.
    Why? You prefer being wrong?
    Which doesn't mean they all have to be... Nor does it mean Disney was necessarily right.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019 at 12:27 AM
  17. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Bill and Joe never left MGM ITTL.

    That's just the spelling I'm used to typing.

    Hey, I'm just doing what I think makes sense.

    Are you this pedantic in every thread? Because I'm too far in to redo the early stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019 at 1:41 AM
  18. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Anyway, next up is Mary Poppins. This film will be fully-animated (since the animation age ghetto isn't as strong ITTL; hopefully P.L. Travers will hate it less), and the casting will be different.

    Here were the actresses considered for the titular character:
    Bette Davis
    Angela Lansbury

    Here were the actors considered for Bert:
    Fred Astaire
    Jim Dale
    Danny Kaye
    Cary Grant
    Richard Burton
    Alec Guinness
    Richard Harris
    Rex Harrison
    Ron Moody
    Laurence Olivier
    Peter O'Toole
    Peter Sellers

    Here were the actors considered for Mr. Banks:
    Richard Harris (again)
    James Mason
    George Sanders
    Donald Sutherland
    Terry-Thomas

    Which of the above choices do you like most?
     
  19. Loulou Well-Known Member

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    Peter Sellers for Bert
     
  20. NoName Well-Known Member

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    Before I get to the next part, I just want to know: was The Incredible Mr. Limpet a big hit (critically or financially) IOTL? I can't find a lot of info on Wikipedia.
     
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