America's Silver Era, The Story of William Jennings Bryan

Since you used JFK's picture for Brendan O'Reilly, a Senator from Massachusetts who became Ryan Norwood's (who had George Wallace's picture) Vice President, it made me wonder how the Kennedy family turned up in this timeline. Joseph P. Kennedy Sr., the patriarch of the Kennedy family, was born in 1888, long before the 1896 point of divergence in this timeline, and I don't see any of the details of his youth being changed in this timeline or any reason for him to not go into business in the 1920s like he did in our timeline. His sons Joe Jr. and John were born in the 1910s so would they have been butterflied away?
 
Since you used JFK's picture for Brendan O'Reilly, a Senator from Massachusetts who became Ryan Norwood's (who had George Wallace's picture) Vice President, it made me wonder how the Kennedy family turned up in this timeline. Joseph P. Kennedy Sr., the patriarch of the Kennedy family, was born in 1888, long before the 1896 point of divergence in this timeline, and I don't see any of the details of his youth being changed in this timeline or any reason for him to not go into business in the 1920s like he did in our timeline. His sons Joe Jr. and John were born in the 1910s so would they have been butterflied away?
Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. was a Senator during the 20s and 30s. It does look like I forgot to actually add him into the TL 4 years ago when I was writing about those decades.

The Kennedy family is still rich, but not nearly as politically connected. The ITTL 1930s, 40s, and 50s were a lot less favorable to New England Democrats than they were OTL.
 
Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. was a Senator during the 20s and 30s. It does look like I forgot to actually add him into the TL 4 years ago when I was writing about those decades.

The Kennedy family is still rich, but not nearly as politically connected. The ITTL 1930s, 40s, and 50s were a lot less favorable to New England Democrats than they were OTL.
So do Joe Jr., Jack, Bobby, and Ted exist in this timeline? If they do do they have drastically different careers in this timeline since they would be in their 30s or 40s by the 1960s? How did Brendan O'Reilly, a Democrat, get elected to the Senate in Massachusetts if New England Democrats are a lot less prominent in this timeline?
 
So do Joe Jr., Jack, Bobby, and Ted exist in this timeline? If they do do they have drastically different careers in this timeline since they would be in their 30s or 40s by the 1960s? How did Brendan O'Reilly, a Democrat, get elected to the Senate in Massachusetts if New England Democrats are a lot less prominent in this timeline?
People with those names exist, and they might appear in this TL (I haven't decided yet).

Basically, Massachusetts before 1920 was hardcore Republican, and after that it was slightly more Republican than the nation as a whole. So in a good year a Democrat could win Massachusetts (if Democrats got really lucky they could win in Rhode Island or New Hampshire). From 1928 to 1958, especially from 1936, Republicans were dominant and thus a state like Massachusetts, which has voted for the winner in every election starting in 1928, was usually voting Republican during those years. Since the Republicans haven't been doing very well since 1960, Democrats now control the state.

In the update "Alexander Savage Part I" (I had actually forgot some of this information since I wrote it in 2019) it says that Democrats made modest gains in the 1954 midterms (they won most of the Senate races that year, but Republicans still held the Senate since these were mostly seats they were defending from 1948). According to a Senate map I made at the time and may or may not have posted, Democrats won the Senate races in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and in the update "The Civil Rights Acts of 1955" it mentions that New England had 10 Republican and 2 Democrat Senators, and that both Democrats voted for the bill. One of those Democrat senators was Brendan O'Reilly, though I wouldn't come up with his name until I wrote about the 1960 Presidential election.
 
This is what the Senate looks like now. Red=2 Democrats, Blue=2 Republicans, Green=1 Democrat, one Republican.

genusmap.php
 
1968 Republican Primaries
The 1968 Republican primaries were quickly becoming a competition between Joseph Niall and Glenn Gage. Rupert Kneller was determined to win as many delegates in the South and in Appalachia as he could, and then have his delegates support Gage at the convention so he could become his running mate. Though Niall and Gage were both from the Midwest, the competition was seen by many as a struggle between the Northeast and the Midwest. The Northeast was internationalist and more moderate or liberal. In contrast, Midwestern Republicans were more isolationist and conservative. These are of course generalizations, but they were true more often than not. Power in the Republican Party had been slipping away from the Eastern establishment for decades. Many in the Northeast, whose ancestors had been Republicans going back all the way to Fremont, looked down on the Midwestern isolationists, who were largely of German descent and whose grandparents likely voted for William Jennings Bryan. Likewise, Midwestern Republicans saw the Northeast as elitist. Niall was the candidate of the Northeast and Gage was the candidate of the Midwest.

The March primaries began in Virginia, where Niall triumphed over Kneller. He also won two narrow victories over Gage in Indiana and Ohio. Gage won Missouri by comfortable margins. Rupert Kneller won his first victory in Tennessee, where he won 41% to Niall’s 32%. He also won a narrow victory in North Carolina. In Nebraska, 57% of Republican Primary voters backed Gage. Augustine Taylor lost his own home state of Maryland to Niall, while Niall won his home state of Michigan. The results of the primaries were satisfactory to Niall. He had won four populous Midwestern states, including states like Ohio that an isolationist like Gage would have a hard time winning without. In April, Rupert Kneller won his home state of Kentucky along with West Virginia. Gage won Idaho and Oklahoma. Niall won Rhode Island, Oregon (where Eugene Cosimo came in second place), Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. By the end of April, most political analysts were convinced that Niall would win the nomination, and Niall switched to speaking exclusively against President Norwood.

Niall’s opponents were not ready to concede yet. Niall won three out of four May contests. He won Vermont, Maine, and Texas. Hawaii voted for Gage, despite being a state full of moderate Republicans, because the anti-war movement was strong there. Meanwhile, the US launched an offensive in France with the aim of breaking into Alsace-Lorraine. The offensive was largely a failure, as faulty intelligence had caused America to underestimate German strength in the area. Casualties were high. On the other side of the world, the US Navy lost a battle off the coast of Luzon. Both were bad news for America, but good news for Niall’s chances to become President. Norwood’s approval dropped below 50% for the first time in his presidency. In the June Primaries, Niall won California, Arizona, New Mexico, Washington, and Utah. Montana, South Dakota, Kansas, and Colorado voted for Gage. South Carolina narrowly voted for Kneller. Niall’s nomination was assured.
 
The War in 1968 New
In May 1968, America was determined to attack. America and France launched Operation Charlemagne. US and French troops would push into Alsace-Lorraine and then into Germany proper. American General Connell Branson had underestimated the German strength, partly due to faulty intelligence reports he received. Tens of thousands of American, French, and Italian troops died and little ground was gained. It was then determined that the British plan of invading Germany through Belgium would be the wisest course of action. In the East, Germany captured Vilnius, reinstating their puppet regime there. In June, Germany fought against a force of Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, and Greek troops in Minsk. Afte two weeks of fighting, the Germans retreated. That same month, Sweden declared war on Germany, despite being an ally two years earlier. Portugal declared war on Germany in July. The capture of German nuclear test facilities along with most of Germany’s nuclear scientists made nations much more comfortable declaring war on Germany.

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(General Connell Branson)

Fighting continued in Indonesia. The combined American, British, Australian, New Zealand, Philippine, and Indonesian rebel forces outnumbered those of Japan and their puppet government. The Japanese put up a brave yet ultimately futile resistance at Jakarta, which lasted from June to August. The vast majority of Indonesians wanted the Japanese out of the country, seeing them as imperialist invaders. Japanese propaganda, however, showed their enemies as the imperialists. It was said that the invaders wanted to make Indonesia into an Australian colony. Japanese propaganda also referenced the Porcherites and the Siege of Arndoldtown. One of the Canadian generals in Indonesia was Pierre Renaud, who led the siege in 1966. He was referred to by the Indonesian puppet government as the Arnoldtown Butcher. Ironically, Japan had persecuted the Porcherite movement and some of those who died in the siege had fled to Canada to escape persecution from the Japanese government.

In July the British would lead an offensive. They would fight the Germans along the coast. On the 15th they captured Dieppe. They continued to push east and north. Their numbers were bolstered by colonial and Canadian troops. Italy, France, and the United States participated as well. The Germans fought well, but as more and more soldiers from Britain’s allies poured into France, it became increasingly difficult to fight back. The British and Canadians launched amphibious invasions along the coast after German coastal defenses had been destroyed by naval and air bombardment. By October, the British reached the Belgian border. In September, Russia launched an offensive against Germany, slowly pushing them back. British and American bombers attacked German industrial cities, severely hampering the war effort and shaking the German populace’s faith in eventual victory.
 
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