America - Albion's Orphan - A history of the conquest of Britain - 1760

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Alt History Buff, Jun 24, 2019.

Loading...
  1. Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    Hello all, I've taken a few months off my frenetic, manic-obsessive TL's of the past and decided to start a new one. I've had this idea bouncing around for a couple of years related to the unlikely but not impossible conquest of Britain in the 7 Years War.

    The opening chapters will be more of a historian's perspective while I later focus upon the day to day lives and overall political ramifications to the American colonies.

    Key POD's include:

    1. The failed renunciation of the Treaty of Klosterzeven which resulted in the destruction of the British Army sent to regain Hanover after the Duke of Cumberland surrendered most of the Electorate.
    2. An early war between Spain and Portugal (rather than the one that took place in 1762 to such disastrous results) erupting prior to the 7 Years' War.
    3. No 1750 Treaty of Madrid between Spain and Portugal which momentarily settled the border between Brazil and New Spain, thus kicking off the Guarani War.
    4. The Marquis of Pombal dies in the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake.
    5. The 1749 Death of George Whitfield, advocate of slavery in Georgia.

    Let me know your thoughts as we go.
     
    scourge, BELFAST, Soverihn and 10 others like this.
  2. Threadmarks: Chapter 1: Little steps

    Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    1749

    Rio Plata, New Spain


    Despite Governor Cajigal's attempts to broker a peaceful solution between the ill-defined southern border of the Portuguese and Spanish Empires, his proposal to hand over inland territory under Spanish control in exchange for the Portuguese withdrawal of their Colonia de Sacramento along the northern shore of the Rio Plata Region would be rejected. In truth, six months travel by sea between Buenos Aires and Madrid may as well have been six years for the speed news reached him. It seemed an equitable solution to the border conflict. Cajigal would only years later learn that, oddly, the holdup was related to the Jesuit missions spread across the disputed territories. The Jesuits were the only people whom could control the Guarani peoples of the region and they maintained much influence in Spain (despite the Jesuits being effectively run out of the Portuguese government by the Minister of State, the Marquis of Pombal).

    Apparently, the deal was scuttled by a shift in power among King Ferdinand's Ministers in Madrid. The pro-Jesuit Marquis of Ensenada had apparently outmaneuvered his personal enemy at Court, Jose de Carvajal by providing Ferdinand IV with evidence that the Anglo-file Carvajal was conspiring with the British Ambassador. A Franco-phile himself, Ensenada would not miss his mark in painting Carvajal's entire party as traitors....PROTESTANT-leaning Traitors, at that.

    Carvajal was removed from office and arrested, though eventually released by order of the King. However, his influence was dead and many of his supporters were expelled from government, replaced by Ensenada's. This would lead to a gradual reapproachment of the French and Spanish Bourbon branches over the next five years.

    As a pro-Jesuit, the order would see....less....oppression by the government. Like most other Catholic countries of the 18th century, the remarkable wealth and power of the Jesuits would be coveted by monarchs. Falling out of favor with the Vatican as well, the order would swiftly be removed of former influence. Ensenada would cancel the proposed land-swap in South America based on objections from the Order that the distinctly anti-Jesuit Portuguese Minister of State would no doubt confiscate all Jesuit property in the disputed area.

    On the whole, the entire episode of modest border conflict in the New World seemed unimportant. But it would have remarkable consequences.

    1749

    Colony of Georgia, British Empire


    After Governor Oglethorpe, the abolitionist founder of the colony of Georgia, finally departed the moribund colony for home after a full decade away from Britain, the calls for institution of slavery began to spring up. There seemed no natural reason why Georgia withhold such a vital developmental tool being used to such gain in South Carolina.

    Oddly, it was a revivalist preacher from England named George Whitefield which was stirring up the majority of the problems. He came to see slavery as a divine institution and, with his unparalleled power of speech, would encourage thousands of Georgian settlers to agree. Having preached to literally millions of people over the past decades (he estimated he'd given 15,000 or so sermons or speeches), Whitefield was the foremost orator of his day. Only his deep religious convictions kept him from a life in politics (as deep spiritual beliefs were often considered a negative in the public realm).

    Indeed, over the past several weeks, he'd preached throughout the colony that slavery was good and great. Unfortunately, one day he preached this in the wrong place. Several runaway slaves from South Carolina caught the end of one of his speeches, waited for him to retire for the evening and then entered his house and murdered him.

    Then, they burned the house to the ground. By the time, the locals reacted, the slaves had vanished again, this time fleeing even further south to the Indian tribes of Spanish Florida.

    The entire episode would make it to England. What horrified the aging Oglethorpe the most was the fact that someone was daring to challenge his "pure" colony with the stench of slavery. A wealthy man, Oglethorpe would offer free transport to Quakers and other peoples opposed to the institution to the shores of Georgia. While they represented only a few thousand people over the next few years, this would be enough to forestall the movement to enact slavery in Georgia.

    1755

    Berlin


    King Frederick II knew damned well the Habsburg Bitch would not let well enough alone. With the new treaty bonding France (Prussia's historical ally), Russia and Austria, there seemed little doubt that Prussia was being targeted. Outnumbered by these realms 30 to 1, the lightly populated (but well protected by a fine army) state would potentially face annihilation if the three powers would truly direct their forces upon the geographically vulnerable Kingdom of Prussia.

    Frederick opted to take up the Englishman's offer for alliance. "The Englishman" was the Duke of Newcastle, the powerbroker of the British Parliamentary system. For years, Prussia and Britain had been at odds due to Frederick coveting the Electorate of Hanover, another domain ruled by King George II of Britain.

    Now he realized that the British-Hanoverians were the least of his problems. He needed an ally...and the British were the only volunteers. While they didn't offer much in the way of an army, they could at least pay for a force of mercenaries hired from the Holy Roman Empire (usually Protestant princes).

    The treaty was easy enough to sign. However, Frederick believed that he may have to strike first before the Habsburg Bitch consolidated her forces and those of her allies to reclaim Silesia, the rich and populous province taken in the War of Austrian Succession. Maria Theresa wanted it back in the worst way and plainly would not stop until she broke the Hohenzollern Kingdom.

    No, Frederick must act first.

    1755

    Lisbon, the Royal Ribeira Palace


    [​IMG]


    King Jose I of Braganza was getting tired of listening to his daughter (and heiress') complaints. Jose was not a bright or particularly dynamic man but he knew enough to see that Portugal was rotting, falling far being the rest of Europe (even Spain!) over the past century in technological and economic development. Fortunately, his chose Minister of State, Pombal, had a plan. He would seize the massive Jesuit estates in Portugal and Brazil (as many Catholic rulers were doing) for the government treasury, close down the convents and abbeys and use the wealth to modernize the country.

    As it was, the colony of Brazil was already more populous and certainly more wealthy than the mother country. Despite spending the past quarter millennium as arguably the top trading nation in the world, Portugal had little to show for it. The nation was poor and backward, exceptional in nothing, utterly dependent upon the colonies rather than the other way around.

    His daughter, now twenty one, was utterly under the spell of her Jesuit confessors and constantly harangued the King to reinstitute the power of the Jesuits. In her last episode, Maria had decried Pombal as a tempter sent by Satan to steal the King's soul. If the King did not amend his ways, he would be struck down by the hand of God.

    This was quite enough for King Jose and he ordered his daughter from his sight until she learned to behave. Already twenty-one, he would have thought Maria would have grown up by now.

    The King sighed and ordered in Pombal. The man had probably heard every word. At least he had the good grace to keep a straight face at his daughter's histrionics.

    Princess Maria would depart the fine Ribeira Palace with her priests in tow. Her confessors was comforting her by stating God knew his enemies and would not allow the repression of the Jesuits to continue.

    That was when the ground started shaking.

    Within minutes, the city of Lisbon was collapsing. Tsunamis battered the shores and great fires spread inland as thousands of buildings fell upon their foundations. Later it was estimated that nearly a quarter of the city's population died in the Great Earthquake of 1755...including King Jose I and his Minister Pombal as their fine palace crushed them under thousands of tons of stone.
     
  3. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    Wow, a 7 Years' War PoD, this is rare, and i like it
     
  4. Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    Yeah, the mid-18th Century (7 Years War) to mid-19th Century (American Civil War) are my favorite historical eras.

    If you are interested, I have a number of TL's that start around this time (Diary of a Doofus King, Quasi-War, How a Bunch of Fat Guys Falling off Horse Ruined the British Empire, Odyssey of Fritz the Turncoat Prince, etc).

    I got a little tired of the old standbys of alt history: what if the south won the Civil War? What if Germany won WWII?, etc.

    Hope you enjoy it.

    Note that I intend to make Brazil a central theme of this upcoming thread. Feel free to comment if I got any major details regarding Portuguese colonialism way off.

    Thanks.
     
  5. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    I also really like this period, i just do not see many timelines based on it in the site

    I'm really interested, i'll take a look

    One note is that without the Marquis of Pombal, i believe that the Brazilians will be much happier, here he was particularly hated because of the heavy taxes on gold(in case you were caught evading you were stopped in your own house by the royal army, this was called the "Derrama")
     
  6. Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    One note is that without the Marquis of Pombal, i believe that the Brazilians will be much happier, here he was particularly hated because of the heavy taxes on gold(in case you were caught evading you were stopped in your own house by the royal army, this was called the "Derrama")[/QUOTE]

    Pombal may have been unpopular but he was also competent and the leading reformist in a nation desperate for reform. He also was instrumental in rebuilding Lisbon after the earthquake. There is still a statue to him in that city.

    In this TL, both Jose and Pombal die in the earthquake, leaving the young Maria the Mad in charge. Beyond trying to hand back everything confiscated from the Jesuits, I'm not sure if there would be much hope for a competent response to the impending crisis, especially as I'm going to be adding in some Spanish provocations.
     
    RMcD94 likes this.
  7. Whipidedius I'm learning how to use it, ok?

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2019
    I'm brazilian and man... I'm SO interested in see how it will affect the arrival of the Royal Family in 1808 (that will probably never happen). We use to say that without the Royal Family and their strength, Brazil would -probably- be a balkanized region, so I really want to see where it's going
     
  8. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    What, I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY BRAZILIAN HERE
     
  9. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    Wait, this is strange, I'm talking to a brazilian in english, aaaaaaa
     
  10. Whipidedius I'm learning how to use it, ok?

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2019
    KKKKKKKKKK
    (untranslatable)

    there's my first interaction in this forum and obviously there's already a brazilian here lol

    We'll conquer the world, bro
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
    Talus I of Dixie likes this.
  11. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK verdade
     
    Whipidedius likes this.
  12. Threadmarks: Chapter 2 - Periphery

    Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    1755

    Stockholm


    King Adolf Frederick emerged from the House of Holstein-Gottorp a dozen years prior when it became apparent that the old line of Swedish Kings was about to die out. Related to the Royal Swedish Line by blood, the Adolf Frederick was of a cadet branch of the Holstein-Gottorps with no real power. The primary line of Holstein, with sovereignty over the family portion of the Duchy was actually held by the heir to the throne of Russia, his cousin Peter. Like the Swedish throne, the Czarina had borne no issue and there were few descendants of Peter I left to claim the throne. Peter was the Czarina's nephew and the logical heir.

    In fact, Holstein, Sweden AND Russia were closely related and Peter was, somewhat hilariously, selected as the future King of Sweden by the Riksdag of the Estates (the true power brokers of Sweden in an age where the King was a cipher) before they realized he'd been offered a larger throne. Thus Sweden reverted to the Junior line of the Holsteins as the Riksdag would never countenance uniting the thrones of Sweden and Russia, two age-old enemies.

    Due to the weakness of previous Kings and Queens, the Swedish Parliament had assumed virtually all real power in Sweden. Broken into the "Hat" and "Cap" factions, which no longer had any terrible political differences beyond pursuing power, the Riksdag effectively ignored Adolf Frederick to the point that they even created a stamp with his signature to affix to legislation should he balk in any way.

    Adolf Frederick was the ideal choice for Sweden. Having ascended to the throne in 1751, the man was weak and malleable. The dominant "Hat" faction would be happy with their weakling King but for one minor problem: his queen. Louisa Ulrika of Prussia was the sister of Frederick II and their personalities were quite similar in many ways. Intelligent, cultures...and domineering.

    She utterly controlled her husband and, within years of arriving in Sweden, began plotting against Parliamentary control in order to return the nation back to the sort of autocracy she'd known in Prussia. Having born five children, Sweden had direct heirs for the first time in half a century but the political turmoil abounded as the factions fought and Queen Louisa plotted, her simple husband nodding his head to whatever she said.

    She formed her own faction and contented herself to bide her time until the right moment.

    1755

    Boston

    While Europe tottered ever closer to war, the fighting had already begun in America as constant border battles between French and British colonies spilled ever more copious amounts of blood.

    Earlier in the year, George Washington had served as an adjutant to General Braddock on his march to evict the French from their Fort Duquesne in a disputed western wilderness.

    General Braddock would win a great victory over the French...though sadly at the cost of his own life and many of his officers. Washington was certain that he would be granted his life's dream: a British commission. This was important not only for status but for the fact that British colonial policy stated that ANY regular British Army officer down to a fifteen year old Ensign could give an order to even a Colonel or General in the provincial militia. While serving with the 1st Virginia Regiment, he had been superceded TWICE in 1754 by men bearing Royal Commissions. He resigned in protest after the battle of Fort Necessity and vowed never to put himself in such a humiliating position again.

    Acting as an aide to General Braddock, the command-in-chief of British forces in North America, seemed an obvious way to get his commission. Washington had been singled out as particularly brave by the General prior to his glorious victory. Had he lived, no doubt the British commission would be his.

    Washington, after spending weeks garrisoning Fort Braddock (formerly Fort Duquesne) would return to Boston with the General's effects and submit his request to William Shirley, Braddock's second-in-command and temporary replacement until a permanent new Commander-in-Chief (with actual military experience) arrived from Britain.

    However, though complimentary, Shirley refused to grant the commission, largely because he HAD NO POWER to do so. Even Braddock only granted "temporary commissions" until the war department made them legal and official.

    Feeling betrayed at having nothing to show for fighting three battles for the King and effectively creating the 1st Virginia Regiment, Washington would resign and return home to Mount Vernon. There was a handsome widow nearby whom he intended to woo. Disappointed, he left Boston doubting he'd ever where the King's colors again.

    After all, with the fall of the Fort, peace would probably return to the frontier, at least as much as the frontier was ever peaceful.

    He couldn't be more wrong on either count.

    1756

    Moscow


    Czarina Elizabeth was livid.

    As tensions between Russia and Prussia rose due to Prussia's covetous gaze upon Polish West Prussia (part of the Polish Commonwealth, a Russian cipher), she had naturally sought allies to prevent any incursions upon her puppet state. Austria, whom feared Prussian expansion in the Holy Roman Empire and whose Empress (Maria Theresa) desired the return of her beloved province of Silesia (taken in the last war), was a surprising option. Many times in the past, Russia and Austria stood against one another but now the little Prussian King was apparently finding ways to annoy ALL of his neighbors with his belligerence.

    A potential alliance between Russia and Austria seemed enough to temper ANY aggression by Prussia, especially when one took into account that the old alliance between Prussia and France appeared to be fraying. Both had been enemies of Austria. Without French money and soldiers, it seemed unlikely that Frederick II was pick a fight with a potential Austro-Russian Coalition which would outnumber him almost 20 to 1 in population. The Prussian Army was well-respected....but come on.

    When Britain's First Lord of the Treasury, whose King George II held the German state of Hanover in Personal Union with Britain, contacted the Czarina's ministers and offered to subsidize a Russian army near the Prussian border, an extension of this alliance seemed immanent. Russian and Austrian numbers backed by British money?

    NO ONE would dare take on Russia, Austria AND Britain-Hanover.

    Then it was learned that Lord Newcastle had ALSO been negotiating with Prussia and apparently deemed their offer better. Against all expectations (given Prussia's obvious past designs upon conquering Hanover), the Houses of Hanover and Hohenzollern came to an alliance.

    Elizabeth was insulted that the British would negotiate in such bad faith and vowed never to forget this slight. Britain's old ally in Vienna was no less shocked and appalled.

    In the meantime, both Russian and Austrian diplomats would realize that this left France, the other major power on the Continent, without an ally. With their enemy, British-Hanover now allied with Prussia, would this not mean that France might ACTUALLY be willing to negotiate an understanding with their other ancient enemy, Austria?

    The idea seemed absurd but so was an alliance between Russia and Austria and the alliance between Prussia and Britain.

    The age-old system was being upended in what would later be called the "Diplomatic Revolution" as apparently natural allies became enemies and obvious enemies became allies.

    Seldom had the political map of Europe changed so quickly.


    1756

    Stockholm


    Terrified, King Adolf Frederick would await the Riksdag's determination of his fate. Over the past year, his wife had plotted with several of her allies to overthrow the pseudo-democratic oligarchy that was the dysfunctional Riksdag with an autocratic monarchy similar to Russia, Prussia or France.

    It failed. Most of the Queen's minions had been arrested and executed outside the Royal Palace. It did not seem impossible that the Parliamentarians would do the same to the Royal Couple. The King was forced to pen a humiliating letter condemning the incident in hopes of leniency.

    But the Riksdag wanted more.

    If the King were to either divorce Louisa Ulrika or exile the Queen for life, he may be forgiven and returned to the throne. Given his meek nature, no doubt the Riksdag (where the "Hats" and "Caps" Parties were in rare agreement) expected the man to cave. However, Adolf Frederick refused to take this step.

    When threatened with the loss of his throne - both for himself and his heirs - he stood uncommonly firm and stated he'd never divorce his wife.

    Eventually, the Riksdag leaders would shrug....and put the entire Royal Family on a boat for Holstein. Or, better yet, Prussia. Let Frederick II deal with his bitchy sister.

    There had been talk of keeping the five Royal children in Sweden under a Regency but too many believed that this would be taken as kidnapping by the crowned heads of Europe. Far better to simply get the whole family out and start again.

    The problem was that the next logical options for the throne were Adolf Frederick's siblings and none of them were interested in cravenly seizing their brother's crown.

    Sweden would drift for months before coming up with a solution.

    1756

    Copenhagen, Kingdom of Denmark and Duchy of Holstein


    As the cadet branch of Holstein-Gottorp would not have control over Holstein-Gottorp, the true ruler was Prince Peter of Russia. Raised until the age of 14 in Holstein, he was then dragged almost by force to Russia.

    Peter had three strong personality traits:

    1. A hatred of Denmark common to his entire House of Holstein. For decades, Denmark had coveted the Holstein-Gottorp-Schleswig lands to the south of Denmark and, half a century before, succeeded in conquering the northern lands in Schleswig, leaving only the southern lands of Holstein under the family control. The entire line never forgave this and long desired to reconquer the forsaken territories.
    2. An abject love of Frederick II of Prussia. Enchanted with martial life, the deeds of Frederick II in past wars led to a near worship of the man by the youth. He saw the King as the epidemy of German values.
    3. An open contempt of all things Russian.

    Peter HATED life in Moscow and his Aunt Elizabeth didn't care much for him either. She kept him as arm's length whenever possible. However, as the two were the last living descendants of Peter the Great, Elizabeth hardly had another option. God knew SHE was never going to have children.

    Seeing that Prince Peter remained the Duke of small, scattered lands in Holstein, she began to formant a plan. Denmark had long coveted Holstein and would do virtually anything to get title to the lands of that Duchy not directly under the King's command (like most Duchies of the Holy Roman Empire, this was broken up among multiple rulers).

    Ideally situated north of both Hanover and Prussia, Denmark was positioned to cut off any supplies from Britain to those nations.

    Besides, it was somewhat humiliating in Elizabeth's estimation that a future Czar would, by law, be required to kneel before the Holy Roman Emperor and kiss his ring. Russia was a great nation and the idea of a Czar groveling before anyone was unspeakable. Thus, the Czarina would begin to plot an exchange with Denmark with included a quiet shift in alliance.

    What she did not bargain for was the Prince going virtually apoplectic in rage and publicly screaming that he would not trade a square inch of German soil for all of Russia. He then, without permission, returned to Holstein intent never to return to Russia.
     
  13. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    Butterflying the Miracle of the House of Brandenburg? Interesting...
     
  14. VaultJumper Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2016
    the 7 years war is has a ton of interesting pod's and I want to write timeline where the American revolution has Canada and the other new world holdings join or end up in the hands of the Americans. Although this timeline seems like it is going to a similar route by in the complete opposite manner.
     
  15. RMcD94 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Dominion of Scotland, Imperial Commonwealth
    Well with no miracle France, Austria and Russia against Prussia and Britain is very lopsided.
     
  16. Threadmarks: Chapter 3 - Fanning the flames

    Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    June, 1756


    Minorca, Mediterranean


    After years of border clashes in North America, the King of France (or more importantly, his ministers) would finally make up their minds to wage war with the damned British. However, in order to maximize their advantage, would prepare a quick strike against this British, this by assaulting the Mediterranean island of Minorca, taken from Spain by Britain earlier in the century.

    The French assault force of twenty ships and 15,000 men would besieged the island while the troops landed. Over the course of several weeks, the Castle of St. Philips would be inexorably constricted into the French grip. Belated cries for help would reach Britain in July and an rapidly thrown together fleet was dispatched to relieve the embattled island garrison under Admiral Byng. Having not expected the attack, Britain’s response would be weak as many of the ships were in poor condition.

    Arriving just as the siege was reaching a breaking point, Admiral Byng would engage the enemy. After six hours of battle and having made little progress against the larger and more powerful French fleet, Byng would retreat with his battered ships. The disheartened garrison witnessed the failure and, short on supplies, requested terms within a week.

    Britain declared war in July in response to the attack, following the formal French declaration by three weeks.

    1756


    Lisbon


    Queen Maria of Portugal would wonder what the people of Portugal would complaining about. The damned earthquake had not been HER fault! What did they expect her to do?!

    The Lisbon Earthquake of 1755 had not only killed the King and his Minister but a fifth of Lisbon’s population along with 80% of the buildings. The entire Empire was in crisis as the army and navy were not being paid. Brazil’s gold exports were being depleted at a rapid rate at just the wrong time.

    However, Queen Maria was less concerned with the Empire as she was confiscating property taken (illegally and profanely) from the Jesuits. In the past, nearly 20% of the Portuguese population lived on Jesuit property and the nation of Portugal had by far the greatest percentage of priests and nuns on earth…with the possible exception of Tibet which few people outside of Asia knew existed. King Jose and Pombal had spent years confiscating this property in order to encourage the Portuguese people to more productive tasks. The process was just beginning to bear fruit when the earthquake hit and the new monarch immediately began reconstituting the monestaries, convents, etc. Soldiers were ordered to reclaim this property by bayonet if necessary.

    In the meantime, the capital of Lisbon languished with no concerted plan to rebuild, trade was down, unpaid soldiers deserted en masse and the already shrinking Portuguese Navy rotted in the harbors for lack of crew, provisions and funds to repair.

    The entire nation was in chaos.

    The Spanish would not miss their queue.

    1756


    Colonia de Sacramento, South America


    Newly appointed Governor Ceballos had recently arrived from Spain with orders to “reaffirm Spanish control over the Rio Plata estuary”. Over the past half-century, Spain had dominated the region but one nagging Portuguese colony along the northern shore would continue to grate upon the Spanish Empire. With the Portuguese Empire in chaos, this was viewed as the ideal time to seize the contested port.

    Ceballos gathered up the few hundred Spanish soldiers on hand, added 600 volunteers, and sailed to seize the city. With surprising ease it fell.

    Emboldened, Ceballos wondered how he might stretch his orders to further and further north.

    1756


    Madrid


    Lord Ensenada would continue to press the French for an alliance. While the franco-phile would never be so naïve as to TRUST the French, god knew they were more reliable than the British. For years, the British Navy had built up an awesome advantage over the rest of Europe. Some argued the British could crush all the other navies of Europe combined (though he doubted this).

    Still, the presumed outbreak of war led to potential for gains. He’d already ordered Ceballos to conquer some border territories in the Rio Plata estuary. There may be more opportunity for gains.

    Most notably, the recent conquest of Minorca by the French led to the hope that British naval hegemony many be fading. Ensenada was undergoing a rapid reform of the Marine department and hoped that the Spanish fleet may soon close the gap in quality with the British.

    Spain seemed more likely to gain from any future war than lose.

    Why, if the French were intent on war with the British, they may want SPANISH help rather than the other way around. Ensenada intended to may them pay. Perhaps handing over Minorca would be a good start…then aid in recovering Gibraltar. Who knew after that?

    1756


    Saxony


    Frederick II of Prussia could see the writing on the wall. The Russian-Austrian alliance was nearing completion with the potential, against all probability, of bringing in France as well.

    The good news was that the Russians and French were notoriously slow to mobilize (a Prussian specialty).

    Frederick was certain he must knock Austria out of the war before the allies could join. The problem was that Austria’s borders with Prussia tended to be mountainous and secure. They prevented the easy and swift marches the Prussian Army was famous for. However, there was the Electorate of Saxony to the south. Protestant and largely flat, Saxony’s wealth and manpower could be quickly integrated into his own resources and used against Austria.

    On this somewhat confusing pretext, Frederick II of Prussia launched a late summer invasion that would take Saxony…and the rest of Europe….entirely by surprise.

    He didn’t bother to even inform his new British ally of his plans yet fully expected King George II to protect his western borders against a incursion from France. This didn’t seem unreasonable to the King. After all, didn’t Britain already declare war on France? They’d have to protect Hanover anyway so Frederick felt able to concentrate his resources upon knocking Austria out of the war quickly and dominate the Holy Roman Empire.

    1756

    Duchy of Holstein


    When Tsarevich Peter returned to his native Holstein, he had expected to return as her Duke. However, the Danes, having cut a deal with his aunt, had already taken up residence in his former family seat.

    In return for handing over HIS patrimony in Holstein to the gleeful Danish King, his bitch aunt Elizabeth, Czarina of Russia, received non-contiguous Danish territory of Oldenburg which was handed over to the junior line of Holstein-Gottorp.

    The Danish soldiers ushered the former Duke to the border and handed over to the minions of "his idol", King Frederick II of Prussia.

    Peter would have to track down the King in Saxony to beg the man to put him back upon his throne. Frederick wondered if the man was an idiot. Did he think that the King would give up his war of conquest to regain some petty principality in Holstein?!

    To shut Peter up, Frederick made him a General and ordered him to "train" a brigade of raw recruits for battle all the (while "promising" to regain Peter's patrimony later). This Peter threw himself into with gusto, though the "Brigade" would turn out to be a Regiment of Invalids intended for garrison duty.

    To Frederick's knowledge, Peter never once expressed any regret about potentially abandoning the largest Empire (by territory) on earth...not to mention his wife and infant son...back in Russia.

    Frederick actually considered offering to return Peter to Czarina Elizabeth for some boon, maybe a breaking in the relationship. He didn't care if the young fool would chained to the throne...or executed. But he doubted the Russian Bitch would want him back now that she had a younger heir in Prince Paul, not even yet a toddler.
     
  17. Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    [​IMG]
     
    wemayberry and Gabingston like this.
  18. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    The metropolis in chaos, and the brazilians only taking advantage of the lack of taxes on gold :p
     
  19. Talus I of Dixie Just a simple brazilian

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Location:
    Come to **Brazil**
    Ho ho, Cisplatina will be no more
     
  20. Threadmarks: Chapter 4: Spread

    Alt History Buff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Location:
    Detroit
    1756

    Europe


    While the continent was accustomed to periodically convulsing in war, the fall of 1756 would be shocking the length of Europe.

    It came as little surprise that Britain and France were warring again nor that Spain and Portugal were up in arms regarding some obscure frontier borders throughout the Americas, placing so remote from European consciousness that even the most learned of Europeans could not identify these places which brought empires to blows.

    More disturbing was the eviction of the King of Sweden by his own Parliament. However, Adolf Frederick and his predecessors had allowed the Swedish Parliament to dictate to them for half a century and it was obvious that only the Republics had weaker central governments (Genoa, Venice, some of the Swedish Cantons and, of course, the fading Dutch Republic).

    The flight of the Tzarevich from his own future Empire brought almost an air of amusement, especially as he found that his Aunt the Czarina had already handed over his beloved Holstein lands to the King of Denmark. The mooted future Peter III was ordered out of Holstein by the King and ended up as Frederick II's unwelcome guest (as was Adolf Frederick) while he warred with Saxony and Austria.

    Sweden's Riksdag of the Estates continued to hem and haw about selecting a successor. The rest of Europe could probably care less about whom they chose....provided that they chose SOMEONE. Surrounded by Autocratic powers like Russia, Austria, Prussia and Denmark-Norway, it seemed unlikely that Sweden's neighbors would look fondly upon some sort of Republic taking power in Northern Europe. Many had happily watched as the previous Kings and Queens of Sweden had weakened to the point that they were slaves to Parliament. This meant that the nation as a whole was in decline as the feuding Riksdag would put their own politics ahead of the nation. Sweden rotted to their neighbors' glee. And no one in Russia or Denmark-Norway would bemoan the loss of the House of Holstein-Gottorp these days.

    The problem here was not so much that Sweden's Parliament wanted to abolish the Monarchy but could not settle upon a replacement. Many bemoaned allowing Adolf Frederick and his Prussian bitch to take their children with them to Prussia. The next logical candidates were other members of the House of Holstein-Gottorp, namely Adolf Frederick's younger siblings. Apparently none were so crass to as to accept. After that, who?

    Feelers were put out to the House of Hesse, who provided a Adolf Frederick's weak predecessor. The current Landgrave of Hesse was the younger brother of that King but was an old man and, inexplicably, his heir Prince Frederic had converted to Catholicism. His three young children remained Calvinist under their mother's care but the entire House seemed suspect to staunchly Protestant Sweden. More and more wild ideas were thrown out including minor princelings from Mecklenburg and, astoundingly....DENMARK were proposed.

    In the meantime, business went on in Sweden. They received the oddest inquiry over the winter of 1756 from the most unexpected of sources. Much of the former Swedish Pomerania had been conquered by Prussia in past wars. Would Sweden like the opportunity to reclaim it?

    Naturally, the most momentous event throughout Europe was the invasion of Saxony by Prussia. While the entire continent's political classes knew of the Austro-Prussia rivalry, it nevertheless shook the whole of Europe. Saxony was, by all accounts, completely neutral and had been attacked without provocation or warning by perhaps the most notorious warmonger on the continent. While claiming that his invasion was "defensive", even neutral nations were outraged by the ungentlemanly conduct. Many nations which would normally remain removed would directly or indirectly gravitate towards the Saxon-Austrian alliance. The first was Bavaria, followed by several smaller states in the Holy Roman Empire, particularly southern and catholic ones. The Emperor (Maria Theresa's husband) offered some minor assistance from his own possession of Tuscany.

    Frederick II's invasion of Saxony took the nation entirely by surprise. Having rotted under an indolent and spendthrift Elector, Saxony's army was weak and quickly overrun or besieged by the Prussians. The capital fell and the army was soon forced to capitulate even as the Elector begged the Empress for aid. However, Austria, not really anticipating such an action from Frederick, was slow to mobilize the multi-ethnic Habsburg Empire's forces.

    The initial campaign went smoothly for the Prussians and most of Saxony fell within three months. Frederick II's plan to incorporate the Saxon treasury, taxes and manpower to his own forces proceeded but would, as time would tell, prove of only moderate aid. The Saxon treasury was empty. There was no great vault of gold in Dresden to immediately add to Frederick's finances. Taxes proved hard to collect due to Saxon resistance. Finally, the Saxon army proved less reliable than expected and desertion was rife. Occupying Saxony would cost Frederick almost as many soldiers as conquering it added.

    Perhaps the greatest benefit of seizing Saxony was that it allowed an easier path to invade Bohemia than his own possession of Silesia. But that would be for the campaign of 1757. His plan was to knock Austria out of the war in 1757 before the Russians arrived if force (assuming they arrived at all). Frederick doubted that the proposed alliance between France and Austria would come to pass and, even if it did, King Louis would not waste resources marching east when he was at war with Britain.

    Over the winter of 1756/57, the diplomats of Europe circled wildly seeking equilibrium in a world gone mad.
     
Loading...