Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes

Status
Not open for further replies.
Not a fan of either, but curious to see where this goes. Obviously some Liberal doesn't think a de jure republic will pass constitutional muster.
 
Not a fan of either, but curious to see where this goes. Obviously some Liberal doesn't think a de jure republic will pass constitutional muster.
A Republic is definitely out of the question. I was even hard pressed to do an elected GG or Senate, but I wanted to try something new, something nobody has tried yet. Trust me on this, some very interesting people will become Governor General.
 
A Minor Meighen Majority

Here's 1987:

After first returning to office in the winter of 1986, most pundits thought Pierre Trudeau would enjoy a long, happy time in office. With Jack Horner refusing to step down as leader of the Conservatives, arguing (with few believing) that he could return the party to power, most thought that Trudeau would likely be returned to power with a majority government in the next election, and govern well into the 1990s.

However, if Trudeau left one lesson for historians, it would be that, despite his popularity, he lacked the political skills to give him a long term in office.

Not long after coming to power, Trudeau's government, and the governments of most countries in the Western world, were hit with a recession, which caused the Canadian economy to suffer badly. While it was more a matter of bad timing caused by external factors, it provided fuel for the Conservative arguments that the National Liberals were poor managers of the economy.

While most Prime Ministers would have opted to "lay low", bide their time, and fix the economy by traditional means, Trudeau was not most Prime Ministers. Instead, with Finance minister Donald Macdonald, he proposed a radical solution to fix Canada's economy: Free Trade with the United States.

The idea proved to be radically polarizing. Half of Canadians supported the proposal, while the other half opposed. Leading the opposition to the proposal was the Conservatives, as well as Ed Broadbent's New Alliance, both of whom argued that the proposal would erode Canadian sovereignty (with the Conservatives further arguing that it would weaken Canada's ties to Britain). While the Liberal caucus itself was privately divided, in public the party presented itself as the only party in favor of the deal.

In a move that would later show his lack of political skills, Trudeau then decided to take a risk and call an election on the issue, despite the warnings from his cabinet. While Trudeau initially led in the polls (particularly due a speech in which he stated that "if the Conservatives and Alliance are in agreement, it's because of politics not policy", arguing that the only reason the opposition didn't support the plan was because they weren't the ones to propose it. However, the campaign soon unraveled following a CBC report that Trudeau's cabinet was divided over the issue, and the focus shifted to National Liberal infighting over actual policy.

1987.png

In the end, Trudeau's gamble failed to pay off, ending his term as Prime Minister (and, soon after, National Liberal leader). Voters handed Jack Horner another mandate, but, still wary over his prior terms in office, failed to give him a majority. The New Alliance, on the other hand, saw an impressive increase in terms of both popular vote and seats, but leader Ed Broadbent announced his retirement shortly afterward. Horner, having had some of the greatest political luck in Canadian history, returned to power and set his sights on the next election, hoping that untested leaders would be enough to convince the Canadian public to hand him a majority government.

Prime Ministers of Canada:
William Lyon Mackenzie King (Liberal) 1921-1925
Arthur Meighen (Conservative) 1925-1933
Charles Avery Dunning (Liberal) 1933-1939
James Garfield Gardiner (National Liberal) 1939-1953
Brooke Claxton (National Liberal) 1953-1957

Howard Charles Green (Conservative) 1957-1965
James Sinclair (National Liberal) 1965-1973
Alan Eagleson (Conservative) 1973-1980
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1980
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1980-1984
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1984-1986
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1986-1987
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1987-present

A Minor Meighen Majority
Canadian Federal Election 1925

Canadian Federal Election 1929

Canadian Federal Election 1933
Canadian Federal Election 1937
Canadian Federal Election 1940
Canadian Federal Election 1945
Canadian Federal Election 1950
Canadian Federal Election 1955
Canadian Federal Election 1957
Canadian Federal Election 1958
Canadian Federal Election 1961

Canadian Federal Election 1965
Canadian Federal Election 1967
Canadian Federal Election 1969
Canadian Federal Election 1973
Canadian Federal Election 1977
Canadian Federal Election 1980
Canadian Federal Election 1984
Canadian Federal Election 1986

Horner thinks he can be PM three times? :rolleyes: Idiot...
Never underestimate Horner! :p

But yeah, I fully expect a Trudeau Majority. Very interesting, I don't think I've ever seen an infobox series or list or anything depicting Trudeau as PM this late in the 1980's.
Turns out he could! :p

...Although as a Liberal, I'd have loved to see Trudeau govern in the 1990s...

1987.png
 
I must say, good work on the series, CanadianTory. Very interesting to see the direction Canada has taken since you started it..
If an excellent writer such as yourself enjoys it, I must be doing something right. Thanks for the support :D

And amazing work Grit. Horner/Trudeau back-and-forth is an excellent concept, and I think this is the first series in which Horner is used as PM this late in the 80's/early into the 90's. Can't wait to see who the Liberals get to replace Trudeau.
 
A Minor Meighen Majority

Pierre Trudeau.png

Prime Ministers of Canada:
William Lyon Mackenzie King (Liberal) 1921-1925
Arthur Meighen (Conservative) 1925-1933
Charles Avery Dunning (Liberal) 1933-1939
James Garfield Gardiner (National Liberal) 1939-1953
Brooke Claxton (National Liberal) 1953-1957

Howard Charles Green (Conservative) 1957-1965
James Sinclair (National Liberal) 1965-1973
Alan Eagleson (Conservative) 1973-1980
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1980
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1980-1984
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1984-1986
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1986-1987
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1987-present

A Minor Meighen Majority
Canadian Federal Election 1925

Canadian Federal Election 1929

Canadian Federal Election 1933
Canadian Federal Election 1937
Canadian Federal Election 1940
Canadian Federal Election 1945
Canadian Federal Election 1950
Canadian Federal Election 1955
Canadian Federal Election 1957
Canadian Federal Election 1958
Canadian Federal Election 1961

Canadian Federal Election 1965
Canadian Federal Election 1967
Canadian Federal Election 1969
Canadian Federal Election 1973
Canadian Federal Election 1977
Canadian Federal Election 1980
Canadian Federal Election 1984
Canadian Federal Election 1986
Canadian Federal Election 1987


Pierre Trudeau.png
 
Last edited:
Very good stuff from the Canadians.

Grit: Sad to see Trudeau go, but an original take on him. A minor nitpick: Trudeau's info box says that his first spell as LotO was under Wagner, instead of Eagleson as ITTL.

Tory: I was wasn't expecting all those dramatic constitutional reforms from Iona. That said, is Martin the sort who would defect to a new party? Unless his relationship with Manley is worse somehow... But still, he seems too "establishment" to me for him to set up a new party. I bet electoral reform will still get shot down here...
 
I agree with Daltonia on Martin, a Blue Liberal and Party Man if there ever was one. Reminds me of that contrived hissy fit he threw at Pettigrew over healthcare a decade ago...
 
That said, is Martin the sort who would defect to a new party? Unless his relationship with Manley is worse somehow... But still, he seems too "establishment" to me for him to set up a new party.
Even I reacted to this when I first read it. And I doubt this is going to be any less so ITTL, what with his father being PM.
 
Even I reacted to this when I first read it. And I doubt this is going to be any less so ITTL, what with his father being PM.
Considering Martin was effectively robbed the leadership (at least in his mind) and polling suggested that his party was tanking in the polls, it's not that far a stretch to believe that Martin would grow a pair and ditch the party. Some people may disagree with my decision, but you can't say it wasn't interesting.
 
A Jovian Election Night's Dream

The 2139 Dacia premier election was held in the aftermath of the Second Whaling War, which began shortly after the 2135 election and ended in 2139. While the war initially proved popular, the invasion and subsequent occupation of Kitasik was seen as unnecessary and costly by most Dacian voters. Kylie Kirner's approval ratings began to slide as the ground war settled into a costly and ongoing while the naval war entered into a stalemate. Kirner and the federal government back on Earth were unwilling to conduct extensive ground wars against other Whaling Congress nations. The Pentagon believed that neutralizing Kitasik was enough while the White House wasn't willing to risk Kirner's approval ratings anymore. The United Nations was finally able to broker a cease-fire agreement in March 2139. Nearly 14,000 Americans had died during combat operations while another 2,500 had died during the ongoing occupation of Kitasik. Meanwhile Kirner's approval ratings sagged in the low 40s and high 30s.

Kylie Kirner still held out hope for a third term as Premier. This proved unlikely given her own popularity and the fact that the Seabreeze Party had entirely folded back into the Republican Party. She formed an exploratory committee in late 2138, but she eventually declined to launch a formal bid for Premier--privately she hoped for a deadlocked nomination that would have no choice but to turn to her. Deputy Premier Riley Martinez hoped to secure the nomination, but Martinez had been marginalized by the Kirner administration for her occasional political gaffes and because she rubbed the Premier the wrong way (a few unfortunate jokes and comments early in Kirner's first term saw Martinez almost entirely sidelined during the Kirner administration). The strongest Democratic candidate was Wallace MacElroy, the former Dacian Secretary of Public Works and a close personal friend of Kirner's. Amanda Hughes Munson, the current Dacian Secretary of Public Safety, was a strong opponent for MacElroy, as was Green Coast Governor James Haley. MacElroy was seen as harsh, acerbic and too close to the unpopular Kirner, while Munson was seen as cold and aloof. Haley, on the other hand, was charismatic and likeable, which carried him through the hotly-contested primaries and into the convention, where he managed a close victory over MacElroy and Munson. He selected Delaney Hanazawa, Kirner's National Security Advisor and a distant cousin to former Republican Premier Todd Hanazawa, as his running mate.

The Republican field was likewise crowded field. The early frontier was retired Rear Admiral Sheldon Bauer, who'd commanded the Coast Guard's 4th Expeditionary Strike Group during the Second Whaling War. Bauer was well-liked by the press, a decorated war hero and a friend of Todd Hanazawa. However, Bauer traded early leads in polling with Governor Frank Maravich of Niviasir and Heidi Carillo--the current President of the Dacian Federalist Society, the former Governor of Sunny Shore and Todd Hanazawa's Seabreeze Coalition running mate in 2131. However, Carillo began to fade fast as Bauer and Maravich became the two frontrunners. But with the two leaders deadlocked, media mogul and Green Coast Chamber of Commerice President Warner Mendoza began to make backroom deals with other prominent Republicans. Mendoza was a well-liked member of the establishment, a prominent fundraiser and donor with deep connections with many Republicans. He was able to secure enough votes to come out of nowhere to snatch the nomination from Bauer and Maravich. As part of his wheelings and dealings, Mendoza agreed to select Cameron Chen--the former Chair of the Dacian Law Enforcement Sequence--as his running mate.

The election proved easy for Mendoza, who alone was worth billions and controlled more than a quarter of all media outlets in Dacia. Kirner's popularity began to drop as Dacia entered into a post-war recession. Unemployment began to rise as consumer confidence began to plummet. Likewise, economic forecasters begna to warn of an impending property bubble. Haley was a charismatic figure who campaigned heavily across Dacia. Mendoza, on the other hand, made few campaign appereances, preferring to use party surrogates to attack Haley while he outspent Haley $250 million to $90 million, bombarding the airwaves with ads. His ads rarely attacked Haley, mostly attacking Kirner while promising a return to normalacy, a drawdawn of the occupation of Kirisik and economic reform to reel in unemployment and the impending property bubble. Unsurprisingly, Mendoza crushed Haley by more than 13 points (6 million votes).



2127 Dacia
2131 Dacia
2133 Xanadu
2135 Dacia
Second Whaling War
2137 Xanadu
2141 Xanadu & 2143 Barasses
2145 Xanadu & 2147 Barasses
2149 Xanadu & 2151 Barasses
 
Very good stuff from the Canadians.

Grit: Sad to see Trudeau go, but an original take on him. A minor nitpick: Trudeau's info box says that his first spell as LotO was under Wagner, instead of Eagleson as ITTL.

Tory: I was wasn't expecting all those dramatic constitutional reforms from Iona. That said, is Martin the sort who would defect to a new party? Unless his relationship with Manley is worse somehow... But still, he seems too "establishment" to me for him to set up a new party. I bet electoral reform will still get shot down here...
Ah, good catch. I made this a while back when I was planning on going a different route for the 1970s. I'll edit that.
 
A Minor Meighen Majority

Here's 1989:

Horner’s government wasn’t necessarily the most popular government in Canadian history, but the lack of effective opposition made things easier for him. For starters, both Pierre Trudeau and Ed Broadbent resigned as leaders of their parties, ensuring the survival of Horner’s government for at least a year.

At their convention, the National Liberals elected Bob Kaplan as their next leader, defeating Donald Macdonald, Jean Chretien, Don Johnston, Clifford Lincoln, Sheila Copps, and Raymond Garneau. Macdonald provided his strongest opposition, but the baggage from his brief term of Trudeau’s Finance minister left many Liberals (and Canadians) wary of a potential Macdonald government. For the New Alliance leadership, Windsor MP Howard McCurdy won in a field that included Ian Waddell, Nelson Riis, Svend Robinson, and Bob Skelly.

Despite the opposition having permanent leaders, they both struggled due to their lack of experience. Kaplan in particular struggled in opposition, and sensing an opportunity to win a majority Horner called an election.

The election was dominated by a Conservative campaign characterizing Kaplan as a weak leader who would be unable to lead Canada out of the recession (which the Conservatives, and many Canadians for that matter, continued to blame Pierre Trudeau's National Liberal government for). Kaplan himself struggled on the campaign trail, tending to be gaffe prone, but a strong debate performance allowed him to stop the bleeding, leading some to predict that the Conservatives would once again be elected with a minority. Though few predicted a National Liberal government, Kaplan's debate performance and subsequent improvement on the campaign trail led most expecting him to be given another shot as party leader.

1989.png

Horner’s gamble paid off, as the Conservatives won a majority government, despite very little support in Quebec – a first in modern day Canadian politics that would handicap Horner’s government.

Prime Ministers of Canada:
William Lyon Mackenzie King (Liberal) 1921-1925
Arthur Meighen (Conservative) 1925-1933
Charles Avery Dunning (Liberal) 1933-1939
James Garfield Gardiner (National Liberal) 1939-1953
Brooke Claxton (National Liberal) 1953-1957

Howard Charles Green (Conservative) 1957-1965
James Sinclair (National Liberal) 1965-1973
Alan Eagleson (Conservative) 1973-1980
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1980
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1980-1984
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1984-1986
Pierre Trudeau (National Liberal) 1986-1987
Jack Horner (Conservative) 1987-present

A Minor Meighen Majority
Canadian Federal Election 1925

Canadian Federal Election 1929

Canadian Federal Election 1933
Canadian Federal Election 1937
Canadian Federal Election 1940
Canadian Federal Election 1945
Canadian Federal Election 1950
Canadian Federal Election 1955
Canadian Federal Election 1957
Canadian Federal Election 1958
Canadian Federal Election 1961

Canadian Federal Election 1965
Canadian Federal Election 1967
Canadian Federal Election 1969
Canadian Federal Election 1973
Canadian Federal Election 1977
Canadian Federal Election 1980
Canadian Federal Election 1984
Canadian Federal Election 1986
Canadian Federal Election 1987
Pierre Trudeau


1989.png
 
Top
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top