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Largely, but not exactly since the Democrats have managed to cobble together a modern New Deal coalition of lower and working class votes, frontierists, expansionists, Columbianists, urban machines and academics. Like the old New Deal coalition, there's a lot of conflict in the party, but the job and welfare programs largely keep them in line.
When did off-Earth colonisation begin ITTL?
 
Got it. And race? How big a issue is it in AJND? Is class more important in politics than OTL?
Class isn't particularly important, since most people who aren't at either of the far extreme ends think of themselves as being solidly middle class (which is basically how Americans have always seem themselves). Race is important, but in a different sort of way. The Terran human races generally get along, but there's a lot of stress betwene them and the non-Terran humans (not to mention lots of stress within in group) and the non-humans.

When did off-Earth colonisation begin ITTL?
The 1960s with the first bases on the Moons. Manned Mars and Venus landings were accomplished by the mid to late 70s (there were OTL plans to use Apollo tech for manned flybys of both), with early outposts shortly afterwards. Heavier colonization didn't pick up until the 90s and 00s, during which time the first manned landings on the Jovian moons were happening.
 
Hmm... OK, the LDs' strategy of localisation doesn't really work in America where congressional districts are redrawn every 10 years.

I would expect the Democrats to do better in the Senate than the House for that reason. But you've said its not a straight switch, so I wonder what you'll come up with.
Notice I also never said that I would do the congressional elections, just that when someone asked about them, I replied that I had no idea how a methodology would work for them.
 
The 1960s with the first bases on the Moons. Manned Mars and Venus landings were accomplished by the mid to late 70s (there were OTL plans to use Apollo tech for manned flybys of both), with early outposts shortly afterwards. Heavier colonization didn't pick up until the 90s and 00s, during which time the first manned landings on the Jovian moons were happening.
That's certainly an optimistic timeframe, but of course it probably helped that these places were all vaguely Earthlike.

Also, the Moons?
 
Democrats- Again, it all comes down to the South. Once the Republicans began earnestly courting southerners under Nixon, there began to be a massive shift towards them in the south once segregation was finally dead and gone. Once the Democratic leadership realized that the Republicans' shift to the right to capture southern voters left a gap in the political middle (meaning mostly northern voters), they rushed to fill it, sensibly realizing it was the only way the party could continue to survive now that their old southern stronghold was gone. It didn't hurt that the Progressives clung on to their New Deal ideals too long past where it was politically feasible to do so (see: Mondale, Walter) meaning the Democrats had a chance to get their foot in the door before the Progressives had to move towards the center.
Would the Republicans be able to make any gains in the South in this scenario though? They only managed to do so OTL due to the liberal Democrats such as Truman, JFK, LBJ, and Humphrey alienating the Southern white conservative Democrats. The earlier time when the Republicans had tried to break into the Solid South, under Hoover in the late 1920s, was due to the Catholic Al Smith alienating Democrats in the South. In this scenario, however, the Southern white conservative Democrats will control the Democratic Party, and they will be able to adjust the party so its views match the views of the Southern white conservative Democrats, so the Republicans won't be able to break in.
 
Something a little bit different here. Yes, it's that Tilden. I have a timeline floating around in my mind, and a butterfly of this TL is that Samuel Tilden loses his gubernatorial bid in 1874, dashing any future political hopes. Somewhere along the line, the family business of medical cannabis, Tilden's Extract, gradually expands into its current form, a major pharmaceutical company and a huge corporation in general. This was just an idea that came to my head when I learned of Tilden's Extract. The product names are of course completely made up.

 
Would the Republicans be able to make any gains in the South in this scenario though? They only managed to do so OTL due to the liberal Democrats such as Truman, JFK, LBJ, and Humphrey alienating the Southern white conservative Democrats. The earlier time when the Republicans had tried to break into the Solid South, under Hoover in the late 1920s, was due to the Catholic Al Smith alienating Democrats in the South. In this scenario, however, the Southern white conservative Democrats will control the Democratic Party, and they will be able to adjust the party so its views match the views of the Southern white conservative Democrats, so the Republicans won't be able to break in.
The south does not have a lock on the Democratic Party when Nixon begins his southern strategy to get the south to start voting Republican. The south's former lock on the party ended in 1948 when it was shown that Truman's pro-civil rights stance that pissed off a lot of southerners did better than Strom Thurmond's segregationist one and the main issue that had set the remaining SoDems apart from any Republicans (segregation) was on its way out when Nixon threw them a lifeline.

Once segregation ended, there is really no reason for the southern Democrats to remain in the party except for inertia: the northern faction had found its niche as the midway point between the Progressives & Republicans and the southern faction suddenly realized that the Republicans were willing to work with them without Jim Crow around.
 
A Minor Meighen Majority

Here's 1977:

Despite having been sent to the opposition benches in 1973, the National Liberal leadership election proved to be a fierce race. Candidates who entered the race included Pierre Trudeau, John Turner, Donald S. Macdonald, Iona Campagnolo, Bob Andras, Jean-Pierre Cote, Allan MacEachen, Otto Lang, and Paul Hellyer.

The candidate to beat, by a long shot, was Trudeau. Trudeau had been recruited into politics by former Prime Minister James Sinclair in 1965, and was seen as his chosen successor. Since entering politics, Trudeau had become quite close with the Sinclair family, eventually marrying Sinclair's daughter, Margaret. On a personal level, Sinclair and Trudeau got along quite well, a factor that, while not talked about during the campaign, had a strong influence over National Liberal voters.

Trudeau's opposition was scattered between most of the other candidates, in particular Turner, MacEachen, and Hellyer. Turner was seen as a young up-and-comer, but while a large group of Liberals considered this as an asset, an equally large number were worried he would be a gaffe-prone leader. MacEachen was seen as a competent, strong leader, and while he initially did well at the beginning of the campaign, he soon faltered and eventually through his support behind Trudeau. Hellyer, meanwhile, was seen as the most experienced, but many felt that choosing Hellyer would be a vote for the past.

With these factors, Trudeau managed to lead on every ballot at the National Liberal leadership convention. While some speculated that a "stop Trudeau" candidate could pick up enough votes to score a victory, this did not occur, allowing Trudeau to win the leadership.

The National Liberals, though, were not the only party to go through a leadership election, as CCF leader David Lewis had resigned shortly after losing his own riding in the previous election. While some had hoped that the party would choose a candidate on the left-wing of the party, in an attempt to bring the Social Democrats back into the fold, the party instead chose Saskatchewan MP Lorne Nystrom as their leader, who many felt was ideologically closer to Trudeau than to Social Democrat leader James Laxer. Nystrom, 29 years old at the time of his leadership victory, was initially derided as inexperienced and too young to be taken seriously, but managed to hold most of his party's support in the polls.

By the time the 1977 election, the race was between Trudeau and Prime Minister Alan Eagleson's, whose popular government gave him the edge, at least at the beginning of the campaign. Midway through the campaign, a scandal broke out when an anonymous person released personal information about the Trudeau's marriage. The Conservatives, as well as as the CCF and the Social Democrats, each denounced the attack and denied it having come from their campaign, though the attack resulted in a surge of sympathy for Trudeau, particularly following a memorable campaign speech in which he claimed "there's no place for politics in the bedroom of the nation."

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However, despite this increase in support, voters chose to stick with the government, albeit narrowly, as Eagleson's government was re-elected to a minority. Trudeau's National Liberals formed a strong opposition, only 8 seats behind the Conservatives. The Social Democrats managed to increase their support, winning official party status and, more importantly, surpassing the CCF, which saw their vote share decline slightly due to the perception that Nystrom was a weak leader.

Prime Ministers of Canada:
William Lyon Mackenzie King (Liberal) 1921-1925
Arthur Meighen (Conservative) 1925-1933
Charles Avery Dunning (Liberal) 1933-1939
James Garfield Gardiner (National Liberal) 1939-1953
Brooke Claxton (National Liberal) 1953-1957

Howard Charles Green (Conservative) 1957-1965
James Sinclair (National Liberal) 1965-1973
Alan Eagleson (Conservative) 1973-present

A Minor Meighen Majority
Canadian Federal Election 1925

Canadian Federal Election 1929

Canadian Federal Election 1933
Canadian Federal Election 1937
Canadian Federal Election 1940
Canadian Federal Election 1945
Canadian Federal Election 1950
Canadian Federal Election 1955
Canadian Federal Election 1957
Canadian Federal Election 1958
Canadian Federal Election 1961

Canadian Federal Election 1965
Canadian Federal Election 1967
Canadian Federal Election 1969
Canadian Federal Election 1973

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Red, Green, and Blue

The brief uptick in support that had ensured President Bush's re-election ended very quickly after it began. By May 1993, the poor economy officially entered a recession. Soon afterwards, the post-Soviet conflicts in states across the communist world led to a refugee crisis of unprecedented proportions across East Asia, Central Asia and parts of Eastern Europe. The president, faced with the largest humanitarian crisis since World War II, sent American troops into the effected areas. Operation Guardian Watch became the largest non-combat deployment in American history and the goodwill generated have been described as Bush's greatest legacy.

This was in the future however, and by 1996, Americans were tired of the struggling economy and the president continuing to say that the situation in many of the areas troops had been sent to were "too volatile" to withdraw the military, most of those deployed there had long since become tired of guarding refugee camps and waiting for the rare piece of deployment off-base to rescue more refugees.

Vice President Quayle's attempt at a presidential bid was quietly smothered in its infancy and the Republicans selected Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, who felt this was his last chance to obtain the Oval Office. Dole was forced to pick a strong conservative, House Republican Leader Bob Livingston of Louisiana, as his running mate.

The Progressives nominated young Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton, whose charisma and inability for scandal to stick to him gave him the nickname "Slick Billy". Clinton's primary rival, Tennessee Senator Al Gore, was given the vice-presidential bid as a way to unite the party and put forth a youthful image to contrast to the septuagenarian Dole. The Democrats re-nominated Ross Perot, who surprised voters by picking controversial Democratic Congressman Virgil Goode as his running mate.

Sixteen years of Republican rule had left voters hungry for a change, but Clinton was nearly undone when several allegations of sexual impropriety with his gubernatorial aides came forward. Damage control was limited, but then Livingston himself, the Dole campaign's chief attack dog on the issue, was caught by reporters in flagrante delicto with his mistress in late September 1996.

With the Republicans in disarray, Clinton twisted the knife. Promising to return the soldiers "home with honor" and kick-start the economy, the Arkansas governor crushed Dole in the debates (Perot performed remarkably well, but his presence was ignored by most commentators). Clinton won in a landslide, shattering Reagan's record for most electoral votes and taking advantage of Nebraska's new congressional district system for allocating its electoral votes to win one vote from the reliable Republican state.

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Red, Green, and Blue
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Bill Clinton as a comedian, Obama as a science guy, and Neil DeGrasse Tyson as Secretary of the Frontier. Simply brilliant. :D
 
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