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A Minor Meighen Majority

Here's 1929, where things get more interesting:

By the time of the 1929 election, the Liberals had chosen a new leader. William Lyon Mackenzie King attempted with all his political strength to hang onto the leadership, but a party angry with being reduced to opposition after just a single term soon forced him our. While King himself quickly announced his intention to try and win his old job back, other candidates soon emerged including Thomas Andrew Low, Charles Avery Dunning, Arthur Cardin, and Charles Stewart. Dunning soon emerged as the "compromise candidate," who appealed to Liberals who had supported King's leadership and Liberals who had pushed for his resignation, so on the fourth ballot Dunning managed to defeat King and win the leadership.

The Progressives, meanwhile, all but collapsed. As Dunning had done while serving as Premier of Saskatchewan, he soon managed to attract Progressive farmers to the Liberal banner, including Progressive leader Robert Forke and former leader Thomas Crerar.

With the Progressives out of the picture, the election soon shifted to a two party race between Meighen and Dunning. Thanks to Dunning's weakness in Ontario, where he was seen as less favourable to big business, Meighen managed to squeak out another narrow majority government. However, the Conservatives wouldn't be celebrating long, as just a few weeks after the election came the financial collapse of the Great Depression.

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Seat totals: 125 Conservative, 103 Liberal, 7 United Farmers, 3 Liberal-Progressive, 2 Progressive, 2 Labour, 2 Independent, 1 Independent Labour

A Minor Meighen Majority
1929


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Perhaps your most interesting series yet True Grit. Incredible that you have such a long TL planned, and I know I speak for all when I say I look forward to the Canada you make.

Arthur Meighen , Prime Minister for almost a decade? Sounds great to me, even though I would have been more a William Thomas White type of guy :p
 
Caedus, how do you plan to calculate the results once you get far enough back that the States' Righters start to mostly pull from the Democrats? With both the Progressives and States' Righters pulling from the Democrats, I don't see how they can win except in 1964.
I'm not planning on doing anything before 1968.
 
Here's 1976.

Normal process for getting Church's votes from Carter's. I used the same formula for Wallace that I did in the 1972 one, since I figured he would be SR's nominee for one last shot. I also pulled some Wallace votes from Carter since I figured some would-be SR voters had decided to vote for Jimmy over Ford.

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So, the razor-thin 1976 of OTL turns into a strong Republican victory here.

US Canada-style Series
1968
1972
1976
1980
1984
1988
1992
1996
2000
2004
2008
2012


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Canadian Federal Election 1999

Under Lewis Mackenzie the government continued the Liberal’s goal of decreasing the debt and the deficit, fighting off minor a minor recession in their first year of power. As well, Canada continued its involvement, playing a key role in the aftermath of the Rwandan Genocide. Since the Tories held a majority in the House, none of the opposition parties could prevent any aspect of the Prime Minister’s legislative agenda. The Senate meanwhile proved far from hospitable to the Tory government, having been packed full of Liberals in the previous decade of Liberal rule. Seeking to amend the constitution so as to create an elected Senate, the government would pass Bill C-43, which sought for "the consultation of the electors... in relation to the appointment of senators". However the Bill would be deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, which said that any such move would require an amendment to the constitution, which in turn would require the support of the provinces. While the western provinces, led by Joe Clark, and Quebec, led by Daniel Johnson Jr., supported the Bill, provinces such as Ontario and the Atlantic would be lukewarm at best, preferred the amendment be the focus of an election first before negotiations.

The Liberals, under new leader Paul Martin, suggested that Canadian’s didn’t want another constitutional debate, arguing that the government would simply need to work with Senators in order to get their legislative agenda passed. Inexperienced in such political matters, the Prime Minister would leave the implementation of the Amendment in the hands of newly minted Constitutional Affairs Minister Jean Charest, who would make the passage of the bill the cornerstone of the Tories election platform. Meanwhile the NDP, under their new leader, former Toronto Mayor Jack Layton, promised to abolish the senate if elected, hoping to siphon off voter support from both the Tories and the Liberals.

In the time between the 1995 and 1999 election, Reform had lost much of what it had built. Reform MP’s Chuck Strahl and Stephen Harper would abandon the party in favor of the Tories, arguing at the time that the government was in a better position to enact real reform. Facing renewed calls for his resignation, Manning would quietly tell the party executive that if the party lost official party, he would resign the party leadership.

After weeks of bitter campaigning, voters would return the Conservatives to power with an even stronger majority government, giving the Tories permission to enact their legislation, not to mention warning the Premiers who stood in the way that their own governments would face danger if they proceeded to block the amendment.

The Tories had won a second straight majority government for the first time since Sir Robert Borden in 1917, and Canada was heading towards having an elected Senate for the first time in its history.


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No Joe!
Canadian Federal Election 1979
Canadian Federal Election 1983
Canadian Federal Election 1984
Canadian Federal Election 1988
Canadian Federal Election 1991
Canadian Federal Election 1995
Canadian Federal Election 1999

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A Minor Meighen Majority

Here's 1933:

Mere months after scoring a second majority government, the Meighen government faced a crisis as Canada soon faced the Great Depression, which along with being a force of economic change was a force of political change. Public opinion soon turned against the Meighen government, and a new party, the socialist "Co-operative Commonwealth Federation," was born. The party chose Alberta MP William Irvine as its first leader.

With an election fast approaching, Meighen quickly tried to implement fast change and turn the economy around. Among the more unusual legislation Meighen introduced was social credit economic policies, which turned out to be more of a failure than a success, and would soon be repealed. Nevertheless, Meighen's move stopped a blooming political movement, and brought all social credit supporters to the Conservative banner.

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Meighen's efforts did not pay off at the polls, however, and his government was defeated in a landslide by Charles Avery Dunning's resurgent Liberal party. Meighen himself was defeated in his own riding, and the party was virtually shut out outside of Ontario. The CCF scored an impressive 21 seats, most of which came from Alberta and the Prairie provinces(1)

Seat totals:
174 Liberal, 42 Conservative, 21 CCF, 4 Liberal-Progressive, 1 Independent, 1 Independent Liberal, 1 Independent Conservative, 1 United Farmers

(1) Yup, that's right. The CCF takes hold in Alberta. It's going to be a while before Alberta turns into the right-wing bastion that it's known as today.

A Minor Meighen Majority
1925

1929


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Would a Conservative government really try and implement Social Credit? I thought that was and is generally hated among classical liberals.
 
US with Canada-style parties in 1980.

To substitute for Carter, I used the other southern Democrat who ran for president in 1976 as his replacement: Mississippi governor Cliff Finch.

For McGovern's votes, I used the percentage Kennedy got in the OTL 1980 primaries against Carter (except for MS, where I gave Finch a 5% homestate boost) that's how I got both Finch & McGovern's votes.

For Brock, I just took the percentage of the vote Reagan didn't win in the OTL southern GOP primaries before the campaign really ended with GHWB dropping out.

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Predictably another Republican electoral curbstomp.

For some reason, even with the boost, Finch lost Mississippi while winning Alabama, Georgia & Tennessee.

US Canada-style Series
1968
1972
1976
1980
1984
1988
1992
1996
2000
2004
2008
2012


uscan80.png
 
This series really lets us see how much further right the US is as compared to Canada - if any kind of weak multi-party system like this arose in the US I think there'd be splits among the right as well as the left.
 
Would a Conservative government really try and implement Social Credit? I thought that was and is generally hated among classical liberals.
It's probably a stretch, but I wanted to get rid of the Social Credit Party, and I figured that Meighen would, out of desperation, be willing to try anything to turn the Depression around.
 
Canadian Federal Election 2003

Despite his approval ratings and support from caucus, Prime Minister Mackenzie would announce in 2001 that he would not contest the 2003 election, saying that he had accomplished what he had set out to do, including balancing the budget and having implemented Senate Reform; he did not want to, in his words, “stick around to the point of becoming annoying”. While he would stay on as leader until February 2002, those jacking to replace him began consulting supporters almost immediately following the announcement, including former Constitutional Affairs and current Foreign Affairs Minister Jean Charest, Finance Minister and former reform MP Stephen Harper, Justice Minister Kim Campbell and Environment Minister Jim Prentice. Despite having accomplished in his mission to get Bill C-43 passed, Charest would see his support drop amongst the fear another central or eastern Canadian MP would open the possibility of renewed Reform strength. However in midst’s of the backroom campaigning the world would enter a new period of its history. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center would be struck down by Al-Qaeda, prompting the US Administration to launch military incursions in both Afghanistan and Iraq. Although politically unpopular, Prime Minister Mackenzie would send forces into Afghanistan, pushing his retirement date to December 2002. Following months of military decisions and relatively strong approval ratings, Prime Minister Mackenzie would eventually retire from office as promised, being succeeded by Environment Minister Jim Prentice in a close and bitter contest against Finance Minister Stephen Harper. After only a few months as Prime Minister, Prentice would ask the Governor General to dissolve Parliament.

The Liberals, having replaced Paul Martin with the slightly more center-right John Manley, portrayed the government as being out of touch with Canadians, attempting to link Prentice with the more unpopular American President. However the strategy, while initially successful, would fail to stick once Prentice promised to make Same-Sex Marriage legal in Canada. Yet despite the rather social progressive and fiscally conservative agenda, the government had entered the period when voters typically became tired of a government and sought change. Still, after Election Day Prentice would remain on as Prime Minister having secured a relatively stable minority government, not to mention a bitterly divided opposition.


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No Joe!
Canadian Federal Election 1979
Canadian Federal Election 1983
Canadian Federal Election 1984
Canadian Federal Election 1988
Canadian Federal Election 1991
Canadian Federal Election 1995
Canadian Federal Election 1999
Canadian Federal Election 2003
Canadian Senate Election 2003

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Last edited:
And before I forget, the Senate Election. Please no "Why not that" or "How about this" questions/statements about how I decided to implement senate reform.

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Xanadu premier election, 2133 (A Jovian Night's Dream)
Democrat Melissa Oritz was renominated for a third term in 2133 after easily cruising to reelection for a second term in 2129. However, a lagging economy and ongoing centaur raids along the frontier have caused her approval ratings to sag. There was some speculation that former Xanadu Attorney-General Natalie Cho or Hyannis Port Mayor Avram Rivera would challenge Ortiz for the Democratic nomination, but Ortiz dumped incumbent Deputy Premier Jim Hollis for Cho while Rivera ran for Xanadu Land Commissioner.

The Republican primary was hotly contested between Commonwealth Senator Samantha Pollian of Minos and rancher Sweeney Hull of Thubbes. Hull ran a mostly self-funded campaign, tacking hard to the right socially against Pollian. However, at the convention, Hull was forced out by the party bosses who thought that Hull was too controversial to win. Pollian selected former U.S. Representative Terrance Goldsmith as her running mate, while Hull dropped out to run on an independent ticket with controversial Khan City attorney Julianne Billick as his running mate. Columbia's Light (a fundamentalist Columbianist party) once again nominated Montezuma State Senator John Ray Turner for premier, who tabbed retired Minuteman General Elizabeth O'Connor as his running mate. The American Heroes Party and the Our America Party both endorsed Ortiz for premier, though many prominent members of both also ran on the Columbia's Light line and supported Turner over Ortiz.

Ortiz and Pollian ran similar campaigns, stressing their candidate's qualities over actual issues. However, Pollian--who'd been a hedge fund manager before being elected to the Commonwealth Senate--was largely seen as being stuffy and elitist. As usual, Turner and Columbia's Light ran hard on opening up settlement and restricting aborigine rights. Hull and Billick ran a stringent social conservative campaign, campaigning for lower taxes, smaller government and lower immigrant quotas. Many commentators labeled the Hull/Billick campaign as racist, but they tapped into a small, far-right voting bloc who was opposed to government and felt threatened by outsiders--many of whom were Christian and opposed to Columbianism. In the end, Ortiz managed to eek out a victory over her opponents, with Hull and Turner polling votes from both major candidates.
A slightly tweaked version with new colors and less rough map around the edges

 
And before I forget, the Senate Election. Please no "Why not that" or "How about this" questions/statements about how I decided to implement senate reform.
Alright, but how does it actually work here? Are the senators elected at-large in their provinces like in America, through separate senate ridings, using some sort of proportional system, or what?
 
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