Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VII (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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How many people are in the solar system total?
Same as the population of the League. It includes all humans (at least, officially) and extarterrestrial contact is currently limited to remote contact due to technological limitations (soon to be overcome ones though). The population include about eight billion on Earth, another two on Mars, and another billion on various colonies and settlements throughout the Solar System.
 
No real lore behind this one, pretty much only done for fun.

I wanted to do something to go with the October season, inspired by one of the earliest threads I remember from my first year or so on this site was something along the lines of a WI of Gomez being POTUS. Also meant to be a small start for me, so I can get a bit familiar with making my own wikiboxes.

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Epic. Good that the Twin Towers still stand and good on you too Kerry!

Who was killed in the Capitol Building though? Any notable names among the casualties?
I haven't thought much about that, it was mostly evacuated by the time UA93 hit so not any dead members of Congress or anything (tho they have to move Philadelphia for a while)
 
(Apologies if it seems I am posting these overly back-to-back; I've had these wikiboxes for a while and just never posted them.)

Ishirō Honda's fallen film.
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The 1888 United States presidential election was held on November 6, 1888. Democratic Senator Thomas Bayard of Delaware was elected over Republican Secretary of State James Blaine of Maine.

The second term of President Garfield had, as usual, been less productive than his first. He did, however, have some leeway to act, as his strong (for Third Party System standards, anyways) victory in 1884 had returned the Republicans to trifecta status. Initially, he had secured an expansion of his education programs, then spent much of 1885 on expanding Civil War pensions. However, as 1886 dawned, Garfield made an ambitious decision: he would attempt to pass the Federal Elections Act. Also known as the Lodge Act (or, if one has time to spare, the Lodge Federal Elections Act of 1886) for Henry Cabot Lodge, a freshman representative from Massachusetts, who wrote and did much of the work to pass the bill, it was one of the most comprehensive proposals to protect the voting rights of Black Republicans. To say that passing it was difficult, however, was an understatement. Few people, north or south, truly supported equal rights between the races. Republicans, of course, could count on having total control of the Black vote, but even during Reconstruction Democrats had made voting for them difficult and the north often blanched at the measures necessary to counter this. Thus it was a major debate in the Republican party of the late 19th century: would they support Black rights, and continue to try and compete in the South, or would they attempt to sweep the North on white votes alone and leave Black southerners to their fate?

1876 and 1880 seemed to suggest the latter. Reconstruction, increasingly controversial by then, was ended, partially in exchange for Democrats agreeing to stand by the controversial decision party-line decision of the Electoral Commission to decide the disputed election of 1876 and partially because even Republicans like Garfield thought the federal troops in the South to be a hindrance to their efforts. 1880 seemed to bear this out as the correct electoral decision, as Garfield won with a nearly united north - only New Jersey went to the Democrats - while losing every former slave and even two of the three far western states. Yet Garfield would not give up on the South so easily - he thought the party could still compete there. And while southern Democrats seemed to be chomping at the bit to institute laws to disenfranchise Black Republicans and turn white supremacy into the law of the land, this was not an instant and easy process, but was instead a long and arduous one, which could be fought. Throughout the 1880's, this fight raged across the south, and President Garfield chose to throw his party's lot in with them. Cooperation with these organizations, most notably William Mahone's Readjuster Party in Virginia, soon bore fruit - President Garfield carried Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina and came up just short in Florida in his 1884 reelection. This revived the arguments that the party could, and would, compete down south.

Wishing to safeguard these gains, momentum was renewed in the party for a bill to protect of voting rights of freedmen. However, this soon ran up against the spectre of white supremacy and northern reluctance to adopt such a law. It took a truly Herculean effort from Rep. Lodge for it to pass the narrow Republican majority in the House, and it soon ran up against the efforts of Senate Democrats to kill it. At one point it seemed like the bill had just died - William McKinley, the House's number two Republican, had negotiated to introduce a new tariff, a measure disliked by both President Garfield and southern Democrats, and silver Republicans from the west negotiated a silver purchase act written by John Sherman in exchange for killing the Lodge Act. The president opposed both, being a hard money free trader, and when he was informed, he immediately wielded a veto threat and killed both proposals, saving the bill, but further complicating the negotiations. Eventually he reluctantly negotiated a more limited Silver Purchase Act with only a fraction of the promised silver purchases in Sherman's act, in exchange for passing the Lodge Act. The Senate vote was close, but it was passed and signed into law by President Garfield in August of 1886.

Backlash to this built quickly. Garfield had spent all his political capital on this single proposal and had little with which to bargain afterwards. Electorally, Democrats pounced on Northerners' own racism and won a strong victory on this in 1886; while Republicans made some gains in the south, this hardly cushioned the blow in the north. It did, however, prove the bill had the desired effect - indeed, Virginia's Mahone machine would become the dominant power in the state afterward. Nonetheless, the second half of Garfield's presidency was unproductive on the domestic front as split government struggled to cooperate. A law creating an Interstate Commerce Commission to regulate railways was passed in 1887, and vetoed by President Garfield over a lack of an anti-discrimination clause he hoped to use to force states like Mississippi that most resisted efforts to restore freedmen's rights and thus remained powerfully Democratic; the Democratic Congress did not oblige him and tried (and only narrowly failed) to override his veto. In the end, the only change passed in the later parts of Garfield's tenure were the promotion of the Commissioner of Agriculture to full Cabinet Secretary status.

This made the foreign policy domain of Secretary Blaine more prominent. Indeed, many of the examples of Blaine's fierce Anglophobia showed up during this term. Britain continued its protest of the Franco-American project in Panama, said that under the terms of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty they had right to approve or disapprove American involvement in the project, and were mightily angry about being ignored. In simple terms, the United States had violated the letter of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty, but this mattered little to Blaine. However, where Britain struggled to get its protestations about the canal heard, they finally managed to drag Blaine into negotiations over fishing rights off of Canadian water. The problem was that he insisted on appointing Russian Tsar Alexander II as a mediator. The British were apoplectic - Alexander II had been an ally of the US since the 1860's and an enemy of the United Kingdom even longer, and the furious delegation stormed out of the meeting. This soon turned to a war scare, with Britain threatening war on the United States and France if they did not back down. Both nations stood firm and called Britain's bluff - and it was a bluff. Britain backed down, but its relationship with Paris and Washington was broken in the immediate term. A coming crisis would soon turn London's eye to new potential allies.

In the meantime both nations simply took minor swipes at each other. At the Berlin Congress, the United States was called to mediate a dispute between France and Britain over proposed boundaries for the West African colonies - the UK protested, but the rest of Europe thought the Americans would be good mediators. Blaine, unsurprisingly, sided with the French - further worsening relations. The main crisis, however, occurred in Samoa. The United States and Germany both had interest in the kingdom, and wanted control over it. This soon turned into a standoff, further exacerbated when British ships arrived, and, out of spite for Blaine, sided with the Germans. This brought yet a new war scare. France and Russia even offered promises of support for the US, only for them to back off when it became clear there was no domestic support for war over Samoa. This, to an extent, humiliated Blaine, and began to paint the contours of a new alliance system.

The end of the Garfield presidency soon began to near. The Republicans were beginning to attempt to figure out how to win an eighth consecutive election - and then their feet were kicked out from under them. The Panic of 1888, while often forgotten in favor of its larger sequel in 1893, was nonetheless instrumental in crafting the partisan environment of that year, and thought by Garfield to be a consequence of the Silver Purchase Act of 1886 to which he had reluctantly acceded; he acted accordingly. He began to violate the promises made to silver Republicans back then, and the divisions of the party soon became all too clear. Party infighting became the norm, and the 1888 Republican National Convention was a mess. An attempt to draft Garfield for a third term quickly fell apart and was disavowed by the president before that, while the Half-Breed/Stalwart divide came out in full force. The panic had convinced the party they stood no chance in November, and both factions were reluctant to have one of their own take the loss, while silver Republicans said that a pivot to a free silver platform was their only chance for victory. Garfield had little appetite to pick his successor and was looking forward to retirement, so he chose to use his limited political capital to merely make sure the party would not nominate a silverite for president or vice-president. In the end, Blaine, in ill health and realizing that this could possibly end up being his last chance at the presidency, reluctantly mounted a serious candidacy. In most years, the antipathy Half-Breeds and Stalwarts both had for him would work against him - except that this year they though the candidate a sacrificial lamb and were all too happy to let Blaine take the fall. For his running mate, Walter Gresham of Indiana, a well-regarded official who had served in a number of Cabinet posts in the Garfield presidency and was a moderate on the silver question, was chosen.

The Democratic National Convention came up with a less expected choice. In most years Thomas F. Bayard would be a controversial choice - his comments regarding secession in the 1860's made him deeply unpalatable in the north. But Garfield's efforts to keep southern state Republican parties alive had alienated the north, and Bayard, an avowed racist, soon began to give speeches reminiscent of the 1868 Democratic National Convention. He was further helped by the 1884 defeat of Grover Cleveland, a Democrat who would fight for similar sections of the Democratic Party, and he contrasted himself against Blaine - thought of by many as an avatar of corruption - very effectively. He also denounced the Silver Purchase Act of 1886 as the cause of the Panic of 1888 and successfully sidelined the silverite elements of the party. While not as explicitly white supremacist as 1868 - there would be no slogans about white men ruling - it hit all the right notes. After a few ballots, Bayard hit the two-thirds, and was the Democratic nominee for president. He was paired with former Senator Allen G. Thurman of Ohio for vice-president.

The general election was nasty, but nonetheless produced an expected result. While Bayard's open Anglophilia and Blaine's Catholic ancestry and Anglophobia reduced the margin among Irish Catholics and increased Black turnout in the South helped Blaine flip Louisiana and keep Virginia and North Carolina, Bayard overcame the Dover Speech by hammering Blaine on his corruption and no small amount of racial fearmongering. The Democrats kept majorities in both chambers, and presidentially flipped fourteen states, including the southern state of Tennessee. It was a decisive victory, and the first time the Democrats had won since 1856. Now it was time to govern.
 
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By the 2060s the treatment of migrant laborers in the Gulf Becomes untenable. The Emirs of Qatar are the first to fall, fleeing Doha in the dead of night. The Qatari Revolution is not bloodless, but neither does it lead to a reign of terror. A provisional government headed by a distant cousin manages to avoid getting deposed by panicky neighbors or restless rebels, setting the stage for the first free elections in Qatari History.

The party of all pre-Revolution citizens who had not fled, led by the aforementioned Cousin, was the Qatar United List. The Faith and Freedom Party is dominated by Pakistani and Bengali Migrants and their decedents, with other dissident Muslims falling in as well. However a majority of Qatar’s population were now either Hindu, or descended from Hindus. Most Indians joined the Hindu National Congress, but some, dissatisfied with the largely Southern Extraction and less willing to work with Muslims, were elected under the banner of the RSS. Despite the professed pan-Hinduism, most Nepalese Migrants took the traditional path of their people: Communism. This naturally provoked a split. The CPQ-(Left) was, while primarily Nepalese, open to left wing politics from all backgrounds, and accepting that the unique conditions of Qatar precluded the sort of peasant mobilizations that had worked in the homeland. The CPQ-(Maoist) had a more ethnocentric and traditionalist approach. The Christian Democratic Party is mostly Catholics, mostly from the Philippines.

Although Indian and Nepalese Parties could have formed a majority, barely, a big tent approach was maintained. A “Coalition of the Revolution” of all parties except the List, would run the Constituent Assembly. Faith & Freedom’s Jamali would serve as PM, largely in hopes that a Muslim face would make peace with the rest of the region easier.

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By the 2060s the treatment of migrant laborers in the Gulf Becomes untenable. The Emirs of Qatar are the first to fall, fleeing Doha in the dead of night. The Qatari Revolution is not bloodless, but neither does it lead to a reign of terror. A provisional government headed by a distant cousin manages to avoid getting deposed by panicky neighbors or restless rebels, setting the stage for the first free elections in Qatari History.

The party of all pre-Revolution citizens who had not fled, led by the aforementioned Cousin, was the Qatar United List. The Faith and Freedom Party is dominated by Pakistani and Bengali Migrants and their decedents, with other dissident Muslims falling in as well. However a majority of Qatar’s population were now either Hindu, or descended from Hindus. Most Indians joined the Hindu National Congress, but some, dissatisfied with the largely Southern Extraction and less willing to work with Muslims, were elected under the banner of the RSS. Despite the professed pan-Hinduism, most Nepalese Migrants took the traditional path of their people: Communism. This naturally provoked a split. The CPQ-(Left) was, while primarily Nepalese, open to left wing politics from all backgrounds, and accepting that the unique conditions of Qatar precluded the sort of peasant mobilizations that had worked in the homeland. The CPQ-(Maoist) had a more ethnocentric and traditionalist approach. The Christian Democratic Party is mostly Catholics, mostly from the Philippines.

Although Indian and Nepalese Parties could have formed a majority, barely, a big tent approach was maintained. A “Coalition of the Revolution” of all parties except the List, would run the Constituent Assembly. Faith & Freedom’s Jamali would serve as PM, largely in hopes that a Muslim face would make peace with the rest of the region easier.

View attachment 866104
i grew up in qatar as an expat so i find this very interesting. i think republican gulf states are sourly unexplored
 
By the 2060s the treatment of migrant laborers in the Gulf Becomes untenable. The Emirs of Qatar are the first to fall, fleeing Doha in the dead of night. The Qatari Revolution is not bloodless, but neither does it lead to a reign of terror. A provisional government headed by a distant cousin manages to avoid getting deposed by panicky neighbors or restless rebels, setting the stage for the first free elections in Qatari History.

The party of all pre-Revolution citizens who had not fled, led by the aforementioned Cousin, was the Qatar United List. The Faith and Freedom Party is dominated by Pakistani and Bengali Migrants and their decedents, with other dissident Muslims falling in as well. However a majority of Qatar’s population were now either Hindu, or descended from Hindus. Most Indians joined the Hindu National Congress, but some, dissatisfied with the largely Southern Extraction and less willing to work with Muslims, were elected under the banner of the RSS. Despite the professed pan-Hinduism, most Nepalese Migrants took the traditional path of their people: Communism. This naturally provoked a split. The CPQ-(Left) was, while primarily Nepalese, open to left wing politics from all backgrounds, and accepting that the unique conditions of Qatar precluded the sort of peasant mobilizations that had worked in the homeland. The CPQ-(Maoist) had a more ethnocentric and traditionalist approach. The Christian Democratic Party is mostly Catholics, mostly from the Philippines.

Although Indian and Nepalese Parties could have formed a majority, barely, a big tent approach was maintained. A “Coalition of the Revolution” of all parties except the List, would run the Constituent Assembly. Faith & Freedom’s Jamali would serve as PM, largely in hopes that a Muslim face would make peace with the rest of the region easier.

View attachment 866104
So Qatar is a majority Hindu population with mostly people of Indo-Pakistan descent?

How would the other Arab nations feel that about that I wonder...
 
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