Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VII (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

A Very Strange American "Bourbon Restoration"
At the Trans-Mississippi Exposition on October 12th, after delivering a speech extolling the virtues of imperialism and the Spanish-American war, President William McKinley is shot by an Italian anarchist, Luigi Conte, enraged by the speech. Vice President Hobart inherits a nation in the midst of the peace process and takes a different approach to the Philippines Issue, siding with Head of the US Peace Commission and former Secretary of State William R. Day over current Secretary of State John Hay in calling for *just* the annexation of the island of Luzon, rather than the entire archipelago. As a result, John Hay tenders his resignation upon William R. Day's return to the U.S., but days before Day is set to be confirmed to his old post by the Senate, President Hobart passes away leaving the nation in the hands of the Secretary of the Treasury, the quixotic theosophist Lyman Judson Gage.
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Despite being the epidemy of an accidental executive, his time in the Oval Office engenders in Gage presidential ambitions of his own. While having been a cabinet member in a Republican administration, before the election of William McKinley, Gage had been a prominent Illinois Bourbon Democrat, even having been offered the post of Secretary of the Treasury initially by President Cleveland before turning it down. As a result, Gage sends out feelers to both parties in the hopes of finding fertile ground for a presidential run. The Republican party dismisses him, already coalescing behind the candidacy of McKinley's former handler Mark Hanna and a "Remembrance Ticket" of him and the late McKinley's close friend Sec. of the Navy John Davis Long. However, after the defeat in 1898 of Augustus Van Wyck in the New York gubernatorial election, the Bourbonites in the Democratic party are left without a strong standard-bearer until Gage enters the picture, and while Gage's nebulous political loyalties detract from his candidacy, the fear of a second Bryan run is enough to unite the faction behind him. To shore up Democratic support, Gage pulls William R. Day's name from consideration for Secretary of State (instead offering him a judicial appointment) and appoints Delaware Senator George Gray who had also been a member of the Paris Peace Commission, and later upon firing Secretary of War Russel A. Alger for incompetence names Cleveland's former Secretary of War Daniel S. Lamont to be his successor. While Bryan easily gains the nomination of the "Fusion" faction of the Populist party alongside Charles A. Towne (with the "Mid-Road" populists being hopelessly split between the candidacies of Wharton Barker/William Phillips and Milford Howard/Ignatius Donnelly), his campaign falters at the Democratic National Convention as Gage forces strike a deal with Admiral George Dewey's forces leading the latter to dropping out and endorsing Gage in exchange for the now-available post of Secretary of the Navy. The Vice Presidency meanwhile goes to NYC Mayor George B. McClellan Jr. whose name recognition it's hoped will carry New York and whose status as one of the few Bourbon Democrats to be on good terms with Bryan is hoped to promote party unity. Taking place concurrently, and not far from, the DNC is the Silver Republican convention, under the new name of the "Lincoln Republican" party. Angered by news of Bryan's defeat, and even more so by Bryan's refusal to run a doomed third party bid, the "Lincoln Republicans" choose to nominate, after a rousing speech by delegate Webster Davis, a ticket of Charles A. Towne and Webster Davis. Over the course of the election, the Lincoln Republicans would secure the nomination of the Fusion Populists, and the withdrawal of Barker and the endorsement of his faction, but it would not be nearly enough to put a dent in the candidacy of Gage, arguably costing him the West, but also shifting Illinois and New York to Gage by narrow margins as the "Lincoln Republican" label caused some confusion in those states.
1900-alt-election-png.859285

Gage's cabinet would be notable for seeing a return to Southern Democratic representation. The aforementioned George Gray would keep his post as Secretary of State after the election. For Secretary of the Treasury, Gage would appoint his friend and fellow Illinois banker John R. Walsh. After the election, Lamont would announce his intentions to retire, being replaced by Florida Governor William D. Bloxham who had played a prominent role in the war effort during the Spanish-American War. Popular New York judge Alton B. Parker would assume the post of Attorney General, later being appointed to the Supreme Court in 1903 and being succeeded by conservative attorney Victor Morawetz. The Postmaster General post would go to John R. McLean who had been George Dewey's campaign manager and architect of the deal between the two. George Dewey would retain the Secretary of the Navy for the entirety of Gage's presidency, despite notable faux pas such as declaring the inevitability of a war between the US and Germany. As consolation to the Bryan faction, Bryan ally and Texas Governor Jim Hogg would be granted the post of Secretary of the Interior. Finally, and perhaps most peculiarly, Gage would appoint to the post of Secretary of Agriculture fellow Theosophist and former Hawaiian diplomat and scientist Auguste Marques, whose efforts to apply Theosophist principles to agriculture would see mixed-to-doomed results and almost lead to the dissolution of the cabinet position by congress.
gage-cabinet-png.859286

(WIP)
1904-alt-election-png.859299

(WIP)
1908-alt-election-png.859301

 
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A Very Strange American "Bourbon Restoration"
At the Trans-Mississippi Exposition on October 12th, after delivering a speech extolling the virtues of imperialism and the Spanish-American war, President William McKinley is shot by an Italian anarchist, Luigi Conte, enraged by the speech. Vice President Hobart inherits a nation in the midst of the peace process and takes a different approach to the Philippines Issue, siding with Head of the US Peace Commission and former Secretary of State William R. Day over current Secretary of State John Hay in calling for *just* the annexation of the island of Luzon, rather than the entire archipelago. As a result, John Hay tenders his resignation upon William R. Day's return to the U.S., but days before Day is set to be confirmed to his old post by the Senate, President Hobart passes away leaving the nation in the hands of the Secretary of the Treasury, the quixotic theosophist Lyman Judson Gage.
hobart-png.863178


1900-alt-election-png.859285

gage-cabinet-png.859286

1904-alt-election-png.859299

1908-alt-election-png.859301

I like this! Great work on the wikiboxes and especially on the idea of a President Lyman Gage! That's certainly a new one that I've never seen done before.
 
Sigismund 'the Luxurious' ,Valkenburg Wikiboxes

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Siegmund was not the Duke but Married to the Duchess in a Non-Matrilineal Marriage
Norbert was also a Bastard

 
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Not sure how plausible this is but might as well have fun with it:
The Square Deal Coalition: Bring It On
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Joseph Cannon and Theodore Roosevelt had never liked it each other. It was inevitable, really; they were practically built to rub each other the wrong way. It was like destiny was laughing at them for having their speakership and presidency, respectively, match up. But one thing they had in common was angering people they needed to cooperate with. Theodore Roosevelt had always angered fellow party leaders by pretty much just existing and being himself. Cannon didn't anger the leadership, but he did anger his rank and file. He was the most imperious in a line of imperious speakers stretching back to the Thomas Reed's first speakership; "Czar Reed," as he was nicknamed, seemed positively quaint - at least according to a press buttered up by President Roosevelt - compared to Speaker Cannon, similarly known as a czar (though not as Czar Cannon precisely), who decided what came out of the House of Representatives and what didn't. This had precious little overlap with what Theodore Roosevelt wanted coming out of the House, and so he wanted Cannon out.

Roosevelt, however, was granted the boon of being far from the only one who wanted such. The party was increasingly straining to deal with the split between progressive and conservative Republicans, and Cannon was firmly one of the latter and did not want to deal with progressives and their silly "goo-goo" ideas. So he used his power as Speaker of the House to shut them out and told them to deal with it. That he also got a great deal of personal power out of such an arrangement went unsaid.

However, even conservatives chafed at Cannon's total control of the House, and he faced more and more revolts regarding the rules of the House he struggled to put down. Otherwise stalwart conservatives thought Cannon increasingly was not operating in the interest of the party, but of himself. An attempt to bring him down at the opening of the 61st Congress failed miserably, but the progressive revolt against Cannon's speakership was not unnoticed. Roosevelt quickly began to egg on those rebels, emboldening them; though many decried it as the president impinging on the independence of Congress, Roosevelt was not one to care about this, and did it anyway. Rebellions became more commonplace, and increasingly larger against Cannon's evermore brutal efforts to put them down. Finally, the showdown itself stretched from March 16 to 19, 1910.

Cannon ruled on a matter of procedure, but the whole of the House opposed it and a vote on it was called, overruling Cannon. This resulted in George Norris, the leader of the progressive rebels, crafting a new rule to complete revise the working of the Rules Committee, and therefore the working of the House. Cannon desperately tried to suppress this proposal, but he failed to whip up enough support and a coalition of progressive Republicans and Democrats defeated him. It seemed like his position as speaker was next.

Cannon thus attempted to preempt this by calling a so-called "motion to vacate," in effect, an up-or-down vote on his speakership, and claiming that progressive Republicans would work with Democrats to elect a Democratic speaker. The rebels, having won a fairly substantial victory in the Rules Committee reform, considered backing down, but President Roosevelt encouraged them to go all the way; they then chose to not stand down, and declared Cannon a liar and stated categorically they would not work with Democrats to elect a speaker, but would merely seek the election of a new Republican speaker. It was a difficult vote, but in the end 149 Democrats joined with 24 Republicans to allow the motion to succeed by a single vote, ousting Cannon from the speakership.

This created more chaos anew, as now the House could not even operate at all as it had no speaker. A vicious fight over the party's new speaker quickly broke out; Cannon attempted to regain the speakership on the first ballot (thus creating the first multi-ballot speaker election since 1859) but was afterward quickly ruled out, as progressives opposition to him hardened and even conservatives decided it was best to find a new possibility. Conservatives then backed Sereno Payne, but progressives still found him unsatisfactory, and voted against him in the next two ballots. Finally, the leadership and progressives met, and a compromise candidate, who satisfied both factions as well as President Roosevelt, was found. James Mann was elected speaker on the fourth ballot of the 1910 speakership election.

However, the fight exposed the deep divisions within the party, and greatly weakened its standing. It was thereafter cited as a key reason in the party's loss of control over the House in 1910, and President Roosevelt's involvement in the affair remained an extremely controversial move, one that many claimed was a harbinger of his behavior from 1915 to 1923.
 
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(is de facto and de jure correct? no clue, i dont want to redo it, soo-)
The Battle of Algiers (also known as the Invasion of Algiers, or the Miracle of Algiers) was a military operation by the French Empire, legally led by a semi-functioning Napoleon II, although in practice ran by General Sylvain Charles Valée, in which the French tried and failed to conquer the Regency of Algiers. The war was brought on by the Military Takeover of France in the aftermath of the 1838 attempted assassination of Napoleon II, which led him to be comatose for the rest of 1838, and only barely surviving afterwards. The invasion failed for various reasons, including the Lack of French morale, Republican funding of the Ottoman Empire, and the superior knowledge of the territory by the defenders. The battle would lead to the signing of the Treaty of Berlin in early 1842, which led to Status quo ante bellum, with the Ottoman and French Empires agreeing to a 20 year long truce, and would indirectly lead to the Great American War less than 25 years later, due to increasing Republican trade with both the Empire of India (who broke free from France during the conflict) and Egypt, leaving the Southron nations to lose their main trade markets of cotton..
 
View attachment 863467
(is de facto and de jure correct? no clue, i dont want to redo it, soo-)
The Battle of Algiers (also known as the Invasion of Algiers, or the Miracle of Algiers) was a military operation by the French Empire, legally led by a semi-functioning Napoleon II, although in practice ran by General Sylvain Charles Valée, in which the French tried and failed to conquer the Regency of Algiers. The war was brought on by the Military Takeover of France in the aftermath of the 1838 attempted assassination of Napoleon II, which led him to be comatose for the rest of 1838, and only barely surviving afterwards. The invasion failed for various reasons, including the Lack of French morale, Republican funding of the Ottoman Empire, and the superior knowledge of the territory by the defenders. The battle would lead to the signing of the Treaty of Berlin in early 1842, which led to Status quo ante bellum, with the Ottoman and French Empires agreeing to a 20 year long truce, and would indirectly lead to the Great American War less than 25 years later, due to increasing Republican trade with both the Empire of India (who broke free from France during the conflict) and Egypt, leaving the Southron nations to lose their main trade markets of cotton..

FYI You got the de facto (in fact) and de jure (by law) wrong.
 
Another state done, Florida!

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A few things of note:
Plant Field is what is now Pepin Stadium at the University of Tampa. Originally built in 1899 by Henry Plant, it had been used for decades for minor league games. In OTL the stadium was transferred to the neighboring University of Tampa in 1971, but here with the state leagues starting up and Tampa Bay Professional Soccer Club (the original placeholder name of the Rowdies in OTL) looking for a home, the stadium goes to them for use instead. By now there's probably some sort of arrangement to allow UT to make use of the stadium anyway but it's primarily the Tampa Bay PSC ground.

The Lipton Wanderers are my nod to the OTL Jacksonville Tea Men, an NASL team originally owned by Lipton as the New England Tea Men in Boston but which soon moved to Jacksonville and because they were still owned by Lipton kept the Tea Men name.

Sporting Palma Ceia are a team founded by the Palma Ceia Country Club on the basis of "we have money", and function very much as a rich third wheel club in Tampa.

On Sebastian Janikowski Stadium, apparently his dad had three caps for the Polish national team and he actually played both soccer and American football up through college at Florida State. Sebastian even made the Poland U-17 team for a bit before he moved to the US. So I'm thinking with more soccer opportunities in the US ITTL he sticks with soccer through college and at least starts his career at nearby Sporting College Park while at FSU.
 
Valkenburg Chronicles: Albrecht I
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*Albrecht had both Giant and Strong as Traits
*Emelrich was his Bastard Son
*Sigismund of Furstenburg was the Last Karling King of East Francia
 
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A Very Strange American "Bourbon Restoration"
At the Trans-Mississippi Exposition on October 12th, after delivering a speech extolling the virtues of imperialism and the Spanish-American war, President William McKinley is shot by an Italian anarchist, Luigi Conte, enraged by the speech. Vice President Hobart inherits a nation in the midst of the peace process and takes a different approach to the Philippines Issue, siding with Head of the US Peace Commission and former Secretary of State William R. Day over current Secretary of State John Hay in calling for *just* the annexation of the island of Luzon, rather than the entire archipelago. As a result, John Hay tenders his resignation upon William R. Day's return to the U.S., but days before Day is set to be confirmed to his old post by the Senate, President Hobart passes away leaving the nation in the hands of the Secretary of the Treasury, the quixotic theosophist Lyman Judson Gage.
hobart-png.863178

Despite being the epidemy of an accidental executive, his time in the Oval Office engenders in Gage presidential ambitions of his own. While having been a cabinet member in a Republican administration, before the election of William McKinley, Gage had been a prominent Illinois Bourbon Democrat, even having been offered the post of Secretary of the Treasury initially by President Cleveland before turning it down. As a result, Gage sends out feelers to both parties in the hopes of finding fertile ground for a presidential run. The Republican party dismisses him, already coalescing behind the candidacy of McKinley's former handler Mark Hanna and a "Remembrance Ticket" of him and the late McKinley's close friend Sec. of the Navy John Davis Long. However, after the defeat in 1898 of Augustus Van Wyck in the New York gubernatorial election, the Bourbonites in the Democratic party are left without a strong standard-bearer until Gage enters the picture, and while Gage's nebulous political loyalties detract from his candidacy, the fear of a second Bryan run is enough to unite the faction behind him. To shore up Democratic support, Gage pulls William R. Day's name from consideration for Secretary of State (instead offering him a judicial appointment) and appoints Delaware Senator George Gray who had also been a member of the Paris Peace Commission, and later upon firing Secretary of War Russel A. Alger for incompetence names Cleveland's former Secretary of War Daniel S. Lamont to be his successor. While Bryan easily gains the nomination of the "Fusion" faction of the Populist party alongside Charles A. Towne (with the "Mid-Road" populists being hopelessly split between the candidacies of Wharton Barker/William Phillips and Milford Howard/Ignatius Donnelly), his campaign falters at the Democratic National Convention as Gage forces strike a deal with Admiral George Dewey's forces leading the latter to dropping out and endorsing Gage in exchange for the now-available post of Secretary of the Navy. The Vice Presidency meanwhile goes to NYC Mayor George B. McClellan Jr. whose name recognition it's hoped will carry New York and whose status as one of the few Bourbon Democrats to be on good terms with Bryan is hoped to promote party unity. Taking place concurrently, and not far from, the DNC is the Silver Republican convention, under the new name of the "Lincoln Republican" party. Angered by news of Bryan's defeat, and even more so by Bryan's refusal to run a doomed third party bid, the "Lincoln Republicans" choose to nominate, after a rousing speech by delegate Webster Davis, a ticket of Charles A. Towne and Webster Davis. Over the course of the election, the Lincoln Republicans would secure the nomination of the Fusion Populists, and the withdrawal of Barker and the endorsement of his faction, but it would not be nearly enough to put a dent in the candidacy of Gage, arguably costing him the West, but also shifting Illinois and New York to Gage by narrow margins as the "Lincoln Republican" label caused some confusion in those states.
1900-alt-election-png.859285

Gage's cabinet would be notable for seeing a return to Southern Democratic representation. The aforementioned George Gray would keep his post as Secretary of State after the election. For Secretary of the Treasury, Gage would appoint his friend and fellow Illinois banker John R. Walsh. After the election, Lamont would announce his intentions to retire, being replaced by Florida Governor William D. Bloxham who had played a prominent role in the war effort during the Spanish-American War. Popular New York judge Alton B. Parker would assume the post of Attorney General, later being appointed to the Supreme Court in 1903 and being succeeded by conservative attorney Victor Morawetz. The Postmaster General post would go to John R. McLean who had been George Dewey's campaign manager and architect of the deal between the two. George Dewey would retain the Secretary of the Navy for the entirety of Gage's presidency, despite notable faux pas such as declaring the inevitability of a war between the US and Germany. As consolation to the Bryan faction, Bryan ally and Texas Governor Jim Hogg would be granted the post of Secretary of the Interior. Finally, and perhaps most peculiarly, Gage would appoint to the post of Secretary of Agriculture fellow Theosophist and former Hawaiian diplomat and scientist Auguste Marques, whose efforts to apply Theosophist principles to agriculture would see mixed-to-doomed results and almost lead to the dissolution of the cabinet position by congress.
gage-cabinet-png.859286

(WIP)
1904-alt-election-png.859299

(WIP)
1908-alt-election-png.859301

Why reunite Arizona and New Mexico?
 
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